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Warning! Be very cautious visiting here!

We had a very unnerving experience visiting this cemetery that had nothing to do with the... read more

Reviewed 26 March 2018
Gothiclion
,
Tallahassee, Florida
It's a sculpture garden, not a cemetery

On our travels, my wife and I always are fascinated by historic cemeteries, from Arlington to... read more

Reviewed 15 March 2017
Taylor B
,
Chicago, Illinois
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Reviewed 26 March 2018

We had a very unnerving experience visiting this cemetery that had nothing to do with the supernatural. On our last day in Thibodaux, we had wanted to visit the oldest Episcopalian cemetery west of the Mississippi. We worked our way through the tombs westward from north to south and then back again. As we neared the end on W. 7th Street, a blonde, middle-aged, thin, woman sitting on the stoop of one of the houses started talking very loudly, stating that she had lots of information about the cemetery. As the traffic from Jackson St. was rather loud and not knowing if she was talking to us or not or on a cell phone, we didn't make eye contact and chose not to engage her in conversation. As we walked away towards the south again and began heading out, she started screaming quite loud about our bad manners and as we reached the cemetery gate, she had actually run to the gate, calling us rude not to talk to her. One could tell right away from the look in her eyes that she was either under the influence of something or not in her right mind. On our guard, we told her we weren't positive she was talking to us and that we thought she might have been on the phone. With her blocking our way out, she started talking immediately about the house she lived in and that a young child had been decapitated there by their stepfather! I don't know if she had thought we were visiting the cemetery because of ghostly reasons and thought she may be trying to get us to visit her house, but I told her I could have done without hearing that and was going to my car to get some water. She then told me she had water at her house if we'd like some and I told her that I had plenty and would get her some from mine if she'd like. While getting two waters, I used my cell phone to call my husband and left it in the car while it rang. He knew what I was up to and after taking the call, made up some reason for us to get out of there as soon as possible. We begged our goodbye's and even as we started to drive off, she ran up to the car, telling us that she had cajun food at her house if we'd like some and even if we'd like, she'd teach us how to cook cajun food. We left, feeling that she was trying to get us to her house and that there were others there to either rob us or worse. Needless to say, please be very careful who you talk to when visiting here because not every one is licensed to concealed carry like we both are and thankfully were that day. Up to then though, it was a nice visit.

3  Thank Gothiclion
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 25 July 2017 via mobile

The graves go back to the 1760's. This is beautiful, historic, and peaceful. There is a fantastic beaver sculpture and a great photo op. Nice to stroll through. This is directly across from the park area where you can have a picnic lunch.

1  Thank 957gaylee
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 15 March 2017

On our travels, my wife and I always are fascinated by historic cemeteries, from Arlington to Hollywood to Boot Hill. St. John's Historic Cemetery is described as "a peaceful oasis more along the lines of a sculpture garden than a cemetery." Located at 718 Jackson Street in Thibodaux, Louisiana, it was created in 1843 from Ridgefield Plantation. The perimeter is marked by live oak trees planted in the 1850s. Among the historically significant figures buried on the property include a former Louisiana governor, a chief justice, a Confederate general, 19th century plantation owners, politicians, veterans of the War of 1812 and the Civil War and World War I and World War II, even an early missionary to Japan. Many of the marble tombstones and crypts and mausoleums were hued by skilled craftsmen and date to the 1800s. The cemetery is adjacent to St. John's Episcopal Church, whose cornerstone was laid by Bishop Leonidas K. Polk on February 9, 1843. It is the oldest remaining church building of the Episcopal Diocese of Louisiana west of the Mississippi River. The church and cemetery were added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.

1  Thank Taylor B
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 7 December 2016

Made me come home and research some history! That was fun! Lots of historical names. Easy to get to as well.

Thank youngaprillady
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 3 October 2016

If your into history and cemetery walking, this is a must add to your list. Not too small, not too big. Good mixture of large old tombs mixed with new.

Thank P G
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 23 July 2016

St. John's Episcopal Church and Cemetery in Thibodaux date to ante-bellum times. If you enter the church, you will notice that the kneelers were made for ladies with hoop
shirts. The building was made of brick fired on the land. The church is much as it was pre-1860 except for air-conditioning and electric lighting. The cemetery contains some of the famed men and women in Louisiana history graves. Especially notable is the tomb of Governor Francis T. Nicholls, who was a general in the Civil Wart, Governor of Louisiana, a warden of the church and later a jurist on the Supreme Court of Louisiana. The parish office is behind the church and someone will be glad to open the church for the visitor.

Thank jtinsley
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 19 July 2016

This Cemetery now has many informative signs depicting the Cemetery history, a Cemetery map, and the lives of numerous people interred here. The Cemetery is open dawn to dusk, free of charge to visitors, who will not fail to be enthralled.

Thank 42,527
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 9 February 2016

Staff was very helpful very well kept. Full of history easy to find. Closes at five. Was helpful in our search

Thank NewyorkUpstate
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 31 October 2015 via mobile

I had my husband stop here. It was a great step back in time. You really get a sense of how long LA has been here. The graves are timeless. I enjoyed reading about the lives burried here. They have put plaques at key graves talking about there contributions. Ill be back again.

Thank diana w
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 22 August 2015

I have to visit cemeteries because my wife likes to visit every cemetery to read headstones. There is history here for those like my wife who look for dead relatives.

3  Thank HENRY T
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
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