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Review Highlights
A good time was had by all

We had a great time. I am from North Chicago and can back for a visit and it was something I had... read more

Reviewed 20 November 2016
kell_s03
via mobile
Loyola at Cuneo Mansion

This is a beautiful mansion with gardens, lakes and buildings. The mansion also hosts Loyola... read more

Reviewed 6 July 2016
AmirJahangir
,
Islamabad, Pakistan
via mobile
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All reviews self guided many times gilded age open to the public great place mansion event art home monument property furnishings acres lawn tapestries
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Reviewed 21 September 2018

Have gone many times for dining on the lawn and listen to music. Variety of many events. The garden grounds are beautiful. Have not gone in 2018 and I believe the land has been sold to a home developed. What the status of the gardens and music events, I do not know.

Thank Stan K
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 18 September 2018 via mobile

A wonderful opportunity to see how mansions were build from an era that most people today have not lived. The grounds are well groomed. The pink mansion has be cared for . You can feel the love of history.

Thank Sharon S
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 8 September 2018

Cuneo mansion is once again open to the public. A property currently valued at fifty million dollars, this opulent palace is now available for self guided tours on Friday and Saturday. For lovers of art and stately manors of the Gilded Age this place is a must. Words cannot do justice to the splendor within it's walls. Built in 1914 as an Italian villa and decorated in fine hardwood furnishings and lavish murals, the mansion sits on several acres of well trimmed lawns and colorful gardens. But the real beauty lies within the home itself. Tapestries hang in almost every room. A ladies walk in closet has walls covered in gold leaf. Every piece of furniture in oversized and made of fine hardwood. There's even a chapel with a bank of stained glass windows. This was truly the abode of a one percenter, to use a modern phrase. Pictures and videos are allowed so bring your cameras to capture this monument to past glory.

Thank markmillieramon
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 6 September 2017

Despite all the information on the internet encouraging you to come and visit, the tours are done. over. finished. kaput. ended, cancelled. no longer being offered.

The only way to see the mansion and gardens now is to
a) participate in an on-site educational program, or
b) organize (or be invited to) a private event.

4  Thank illinoistravelere
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 11 April 2017

the house and gardens are a beautiful backdrop to any event, be it wedding, art fest or jazz evening. The house used to be open for tours, but they are closed for renovations now

Thank Daiva C
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 30 December 2016

Today, we marvel as we stroll the hallways and parlors and gardens of Victorian mansions, marble monuments to the Gilded Age. San Simeon, William Randolph Heart's castle in California, is most noteworthy. Two others that immediately come to mind are George Vanderbilt's Biltmore in Asheville, North Carolina, and Henry Flagler's Whitehall in Palm Beach, Florida. And Marble House in Newport, Rhode Island. Chicagoans can admire a reproduction of Hearst's San Simeon or Charles Foster Kane's fictional "Xanadu" of Citizen Kane fame at the Cuneo Museum and Gardens in north suburban Vernon Hills. Located at 1350 North Milwaukee Avenue, it was built in 1914 for Samuel Insull, an original founder of the General Electric Company. Insull, who once served as Thomas Edison's personal assistant, lost his fortune in the Great Depression and died of a heart attack in 1938 with 84 cents in his pocket. He was identified by a hotel laundry bill in his pocket. In 1937, John Cuneo Sr., the founder of the Cuneo Press and Hawthorn Mellody Dairy, purchased the mansion. It remained the family home until the death of Cuneo's widow in 1990. In 2009, the house was donated to Loyola University of Chicago. The Mediterranean style mansion, noted for its opulent Venetian style architecture, features a 40-foot high great central hall with arcaded balconies, a grand staircase, lavish double formal dining rooms and a private chapel with exquisite stained glass windows and wonderful frescoed ceilings. The mansion's antique furnishings, Renaissance paintings, 17th century tapestries, silver and porcelain collections are the result of the Cuneo family's lifelong collecting. The grounds were designed by renowned landscape architect Jens Jensen and comprise 75 acres of lakes, fountains, formal gardens, antique classical statuary, a private 9-hole golf course and a conservatory housing exotic plants. If that's not enough, the walls of the indoor swimming pool are in travertine marble. This is a must-see for anyone who appreciates art and culture, an absolute feast for the eyes. Charles Foster Kane would have loved this "Marble Museum," which utilized 17 different kinds of marble in its construction.

2  Thank Taylor B
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 5 December 2016

“Let me tell you about the very rich. They are different from you and me."
- F. Scott Fitzgerald

The Cuneo Mansion is a monument to different. While the building itself is historic and houses an interesting collection of furniture and art, even more interesting were the two families who made it home.

Samuel Insull, who built the house way back in 1914, was a British-born business baron who began his ascent to riches while working as Thomas Edison's personal assistant. He married a woman named Gladys Wallis, who was a popular Broadway actress and an insufferable prima donna. After building a business empire - yes, he DID BUILD THAT! - Insull lost it all in the Great Depression. These two people were so interesting that the writers of the classic American film “Citizen Kane“ used them as inspiration for character development. You need to research Samuel Insull to gain historic perspective, before touring the mansion.

Same goes for the Cuneos. Do your homework and try to understand the mindset of these people: family members; why this house was best-suited for them; the surroundings, decor, each unique room and its own history. For example: there is no question that the Catholic faith was a very important part of the Cuneos' lives. Take a close look at the over-the-top family chapel and their collection of centuries-old, iconic religious art and artifacts. Obsessive? Or just conspicuously, richly devout. No doubt, there's more than enough here for another blockbuster movie - or, at very least, a captivating mini-series!

It's also interesting to note that not so many years ago, this place was still a family home. How comfortable was it? How homey - as most “ordinary people“ would relate to “homey” - could it have been? IMHO: the most “comfortable” room in this house is “The Ship's Room.“ But only with the addition of a 60" flat screen HDTV, an appropriate BarcaLounger and WiFi, of course.

A visit to the Cuneo Mansion is worth the trip. Just remember . . .

”No man can tell whether he is rich or poor by turning to his ledger. It is the heart that makes a man rich. He is rich according to what he is, not according to what he has.”
- Henry Ward Beecher

4  Thank Vacation810441
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 20 November 2016 via mobile

We had a great time. I am from North Chicago and can back for a visit and it was something I had never done. So glad
I did!!

Thank kell_s03
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 25 September 2016

My first visit to Cuneo mansion and gardens. It's been closed for the last two years for ongoing renovations. Loyola University has done a superb job. You won't notice most of the $7 million they've spent renovating, but that's why this place is so special. They've restored most of the old roof and foundation, and replaced windows on the second floor with historically appropriate, but energy efficient windows that will last for 100 years. I highly recommend taking advantage of the self guided tours on select Saturdays in October and November. Admission is complimentary, and there are two Loyola PHDs on hand who speak each hour about the history of the mansion. They remain available from 12-4 to answer your questions and then some! Incredible experience. Google Cuneo mansion to find fall Saturday hours.

Thank Kimberly B
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 6 July 2016 via mobile

This is a beautiful mansion with gardens, lakes and buildings.

The mansion also hosts Loyola students for their extra classes. Entry to the mansion is through a guarded gate. It is next to the Mall

Thank AmirJahangir
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
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