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Review Highlights
This is the daddy of all the beaches in the Gower

This is without doubt the best beach in all of the UK let alone Wales or the Gower, I have been... read more

Reviewed 8 September 2018
Steve T
,
Colne, United Kingdom
Gower Gem!

Another one of my favourite places. Been here hundreds of times and it can be human free on... read more

Reviewed 5 August 2018
PaulDrewsterDrew
,
Llanberis, United Kingdom
via mobile
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All reviews the cliff worms head stunning views beautiful beach car park mewslade rocks rhossili tide gower uk beaches picnic surfing walks
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Reviewed 29 March 2016

A beautiful bay accessed by a lovely walk via one of the many footpaths across the 'vile'. Peaceful yet fun for children with the sea and rock pools.

Thank AnnHerts
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 15 March 2016

Having parked in the more than ample sized National Trust Car Park (£4) all day ( or free to NT members), it was a lovely stroll along the cliff top path to Fall Bay. Some inclines to deal with but the views allowed one a ready excuse to stop and catch a breath! The tide was full in so no opportunity to take the steep descent down to the bay itself, but no matter as it was fine just sitting on the cliff tops to enjoy the views. A lovely area of Gower, a little more out of the way for it to get over populated in the Summer, providing stunning views.

Thank Linda G
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 14 February 2016 via mobile

Beautiful hidden gem in the Gower peninsula.
Off the main track it's only accessed through several fields (that I know of)
Rolling fields suddenly drop away reviling the shear cliffs, absolutely stunning and worth the trek to get there.
This place makes you realise how very small we are.

Thank TommTRJ
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 29 December 2015

A lovely bay in beautiful Gower. A nice walk down a bit tougher coming back up but so worth it. A picnic and a dry day is all you need

Thank Niki284
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 19 October 2015

Want to park your car next to an easily accessible beach with lifeguards, ice-cream vans and souvenir shops? don’t go to Fall bay or Mewslade! Want to visit a hauntingly beautiful bay with rare wildlife and outdoor activities? Then this is for you.
Getting to either bay is not easy, whether you drive or catch a bus a minimum of a 15 minute walk awaits you. If you drive follow the B4247 towards Rhossili, when you enter Piton take the left hand turning after Pitton Cross caravan Park and drive into the field which is marked up with parking spaces. Pop £3 in the honesty box and walk towards the barns where you turn right at the gate. Follow the path all the way until it brings you into a valley which leads to beautiful Mewslade beach, Fall bay is to your right as you face the sea.
If you’re on the bus then it’s the 118 or 119 from stand u in Swansea. Take it for an hour to Rhossili and jump off just before the Worms Head hotel. Continue along the path to Worms Head but turn left as you approach the coastguard hut. Follow the dry stone wall for 5 minutes until it brings you to a spectacular view of Fall Bay, Bristol Channel and the cliffs down past the Knave.
Mewslade and Fall bay are different beaches but at low tide are joined, so we ll look at them both together. They are two of the hardest beaches to reach in Gower which means they are never crowded. At high tide Mewslades beach almost totally disappears under the in-coming tide and Fall bay is left with very little sand to sit on. A limestone kiln can be found just below the foot style which leads to Middleton but above the beach.
Neither bay has lifeguards and Mewslades rip tide means swimming can be hazardous. The sea there however can be crystal clear with colours like the Mediterranean. Water sports such as surfing, canoeing and fishing are very popular at Fall and Mewslade Cliff formations means its recognised nationally as a top climbing location. A new sport to hit the area recently is Coasteering
Coasteering is an activity where you move along the tidal zone of a rocky coastline on foot or by swimming, without the aid of boats or surf boards. At Mewslade you can swim through the caves, jump off the cliffs into the sea and climb and scramble up the rocks to get back onto the shore. Dressing in wetsuits helmets and buoyancy aids are a must and ropes and lines are not used. Jumping and Diving: are often seen as an appealing and exciting part of coasteering. RIPNROCK are just one of the Gower companies that take organised coasteering at Mewslade you can contact them via their facebook page
Remember this is a spectacular area of natural beauty but it must be respected as changes in weather and natural hazards can pose serious dangers.
Did you know?
A detached house with 4 reception rooms, 5 bedrooms, outdoor BBQ/living area with sea views will cost you £695,000. Or a five bedroom semi-detached home situated in a secluded location in Middleton which is about a ten minute walk to Mewslade Bay can be yours for £499,950. Also did you know Middleton was the birthplace of Petty Officer Edgar Evans of Scott’s ill-fated Antarctic Expedition?
Edgar Evans
Evans described as "a huge, bull-necked beefy figure" and a "beery womanizer", was held in high regard by Scott for "his resourcefulness, his strength and fund of anecdotes," Scott chose Evans as a member of his polar party, which reached the South Pole on 17 January 1912, only to discover that Roald Amundsen's 5-man party had beaten them to the Pole by 5 weeks.
Their return journey soon became a desperate. Evans had cut his hand and the wound did not heal properly, he began deteriorate mentally as well as physically, suffering from frostbite and a serious head injury following a fall.
On 16 February 1912, Evans collapsed and unable to keep up was left behind while the others went ahead. When Scott returned for him after replenishing supplies he found Evans on his knees, clothing disarranged, hands uncovered and frostbitten and with a "wild look in his eyes". He died that night.
No one knows what happened to his body, and none of the other members of the polar party survived the return journey. His widow, Lois had a plaque placed, in his memory, in the church at Rhossilli. which reads "To the Glory of God and in memory of Edgar Evans 1st Class Petty Officer, R.N., and a native of this Parish, who perished on the 17 February 1912, when returning from the South Pole with the Southern Party of the British Antarctic Expedition under the command of Captain Robert Falcon Scott, C.V.O., R.N. 'To seek, to strive, to find, and not to yield.'"
A Twitchers Dream
Do you enjoy bird watching as this area is a twitchers dream. On the walk to Mewslade from Middleton you ll pass through a small valley where there is a large variety of birds. The ultimate bird to spot must be the Hoopoe. The RSPB describes the hoopoe as an exotic looking bird that is the size of a mistle thrush. It has a pinkish-brown body, striking black and white wings, a long black downcurved bill, and a long pinkish-brown crest which it raises when excited. This bird is mainly a European and African dweller and does not breed in the UK. It is a very rare sight in the Gower or the South Wales area but Mewslade is a hot spot.
One of my favourite birds is the Chough. At first glance the Chough looks like a crow as it is part of the corvid family, but has an orange beak and feet and an unusual call. Its population is small in the UK and again Mewslade is a great place to watch their wonderful aerial displays, expertly swooping and diving over the craggy limestone cliffs.
Staying over?
Fancy staying the night or two? Well I’ve got three great choices for you, all within a mile and a half walk to Mewslade. Let’s start with the Shepherds huts at Pitton Cross from Scamper holidays. These quirky little huts can sleep between 2 and 5. They have a kitchen, bedroom and lovely decking area. The cost of a winter weekend starts at £200 or £475 per week. They are pet friendly and all bedding etc. is included. Call Kathryn or Mark 01792-202325 for more information
Staying at Pitton Cross Caravan and Camping Park in your caravan will cost £60 for four nights or how about £105 for a week as a special winter offer for the over 50s. The campsite is well positioned for the bays and has excellent facilities with a specialist kite shop. Ring Ian for bookings on 01792-390593
Perhaps a detached house next door to renowned Gower photographer Mark Button? It sleeps 14 and will cost you £1500 for a week. You can also (when available) stay for £30 per person per night which for its location is a great choice. You never know you may get Mark to give you a few photography tips. Interested? Phone Mark on 07812173880
Time for Wine
This is tricky this month as Mewslade and Fall are so remote, they don’t have a pub or restaurant that near to them but I’m going to recommend the recently revamped Monksland in Scurlage which has excellent trip advisor reviews.
The food is recommended with ample sized portions and it’s next door to the Gower holiday village which has its own indoor pool, so if the weather isn’t kind you could entertain the kids, have a bite to eat and a cheeky glass of vino! Winter hours are Thursdays and Fridays open 15:00hrs – 21:00hrs with Food served 17:00 – 20:30hrs. Saturdays are 12:00 – 23:00 Food served 12:00 – 21:00 and Sundays 12:00 – 21:00 Carvery served 12:00 – 16:00 don’t forget to book your tables for the popular Sunday Carvery 01792-390597
You could try the Granary on the way to the bays for a traditional farm house breakfast or for a bag of chips on the way home call into Chips Ahoy both in Scurlage.
Alternatively if you decide to stay over and self-cater in a shepherds hut, caravan or tent why not really spoil yourself with a truly beautiful wine. The New Zealand wine Cloudy Bay has a Sauvignon Blanc which is a stunning. It’s not cheap (around £18 a bottle) and can be difficult to find but you won’t regret it. To quote the company “The nose is bright with aromas of kaffir lime and grapefruit. A generous palate reveals ripe citrus, stone fruit and lemongrass flavours balanced by crunchy acidity” All I can add to that is that it tastes wonderful
Richard Hammond Swansea Life Magazine @Richie_Hammond - twitter

Thank richiehd
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
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