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Lovely little spot

Went here because I assumed it had some nice gardens which it turned out it didn’t.. however the... read more

Reviewed 3 May 2018
Lauren W
,
Carlisle, United Kingdom
via mobile
Amazing house!

I was pleased to finally have a chance to visit this historic house designed by Josiah Condor... read more

Reviewed 5 September 2017
Banda-in-Japan
,
Tokyo, Japan
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All reviews billiard room japanese house meiji period josiah condor architecture tokyo tourists
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Reviewed 3 May 2018 via mobile

Went here because I assumed it had some nice gardens which it turned out it didn’t.. however the buildings were really interesting to look around and totally random in the middle of Tokyo. Great style & architecture and a lot of history. Worth making a detour to visit.

Thank Lauren W
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 30 November 2017

This is a rather unusual place... which likely is overlooked... industrialist from 1920th... decided to put some real estate on his property... so we have Swiss-style billiard room, western (colonial????) style main building and Japan-style building -- all together.... do they fit? NO do they have to ft, NO -- if you have tons of money and things that are of interest to you.... it does not matter what others think about your ways....

go ahead, check it out and let me know what you think about this one!

Thank MarcinDrP
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 5 September 2017

I was pleased to finally have a chance to visit this historic house designed by Josiah Condor. It's wonderful that the city of Tokyo is preserving it.

The staff were friendly and provided English materials that helped us understand what we were looking at. Although it would have been cool if some of the rooms contained period furnishings, even without furniture it was still quite splendid.

There was a loop video in one room that could be programmed to play in English and provided more information and even footage of the basement area that tourists are not permitted to see.

It was especially fascinating to realize that the Iwasaki family lived in the adjacent Japanese house and only used the Western house for guests and entertaining.

Definitely an interesting slice of Meiji period Tokyo!

1  Thank Banda-in-Japan
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 17 December 2016

This is a fascinating example of Meiji "western-style" architecture. The house was designed by British architect Josiah Condor for the Mitsubishi corp family. It was used as a guest house and the family lived in the attached Japanese house.

The architecture exemplifies Japan in a moment of experimentation in building design, techniques and materials. The red brick basement was layed in British style with red bricks made in a new Japanese brick factory. The dark carved wood interior is reminiscent of British and Moorish designs; the type and origin of the wood is unknown.

I chatted with a volunteer on one of the floors whose English was great and who was extremely knowledgeable. If you happen to run into a friendly volunteer pick their brain for info!

1  Thank raku
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 11 December 2016

Interesting architectural mixture between western and japanese architectures. Unfortunately not much left from the original residential complex of the founders of the Mitsubishi financial empire. The western building and the billiard room are still there (though partially under refurbishment in December 2016). Suggested for a special sight in Tokyo, but nothing special, since the site extension is quite limited. Limited information in English, which makes the place only partially enjoyable by a non-japanese.

1  Thank SilkDragonfly
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 4 December 2016 via mobile

Although it is advertised as the "garden", the focus is on the residence. The 2 level house was built about 100 years ago by an English architect, and the style is western. Not very commonly found in Japan but should not be very special in England. The place has been well maintained. The decorations inside are not luxurious but quite elegant, with good attention to details. Unlike museum houses in Europe, there are not many old furniture or relics displayed here. Immediately connected to this western house is a Japanese house where the host lived. The western part was for guests. Besides, there is also a separate small chalet style house built for playing billiard. This house is closed to visitors. The garden itself, on the other hand, contains nothing special.

Thank Yan C
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 30 November 2016

This house is located near Ueno Park. It's an interesting mixture of Western and Japanese architecture and worth a visit if you are interested in architecture. Allow about 30mins for a visit.

1  Thank SPS S
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 15 November 2016

The third president of Mitsubishi purchased the land that these mansions and gardens situate in 1896. The British architect, Condor was then hired to design a two-story home reminiscent and incorporating both Jacobean Renaissance Revival and Pennsylvanian Estate architecture. Both were successfully accomplished and in doing so contributed to the foreign overview of a civilized society.

Additionally, the grounds behind house a magnificent Japanese mansion where it appears that the Iwasaki family owners actually lived, while leaving the 'European' manor for guests. Of additional special interest is a billiard house constructed in a Swiss cabin like styling adjacent to the dominant estate.

The mixture of architectural style and the quality of such, inclusive of exquisite finishing and attention to detail makes this a most worthwhile destination on any trip to Tokyo.

Thank Dalecorp
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 14 November 2016

While this house might not be so interesting for those used to Jacobean and Victorian architecture, it's an unusual house to find in Tokyo. Formerly the mansion of the Mitsubishi family, the attractive house with porches sits on a large block of land near Ueno Park. One of the most interesting parts is the free-standing billiards room, built like a Swiss Chalet. The main house leads directly into a traditional Japanese house, which is quite surprising. Be aware that you need to take off your shoes to tour the houses and you can't take photos inside. There are some coin lockers at the ticket office for storing large bags and tickets are reasonable. The Japanese house has a small tea room with snacks. You can also bring your own food and drinks to enjoy at tables in the gardens.

Thank Kirsty M
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
Reviewed 2 August 2016 via mobile

The estate was built in 1896 by one of the early leaders of the Mitsubishi company. While only about 1/3 of its original size, the estate is interesting to visit from an architectural perspective because there are 3 distinct building styles right next to each other. And while there is virtually no furniture in any of the homes, one can imagine activities that took place there. There was not any tour but there was a short video that could be played in English after getting some assistance from the docent to make the selection. The rooms had some English description to explain main architectural features but overall was a little limited. What was amazing was seeing the pure size of the place and then comparing it to the Japanese residence attached to it, and then comparing both to the tenement homes displayed in the Shitamachi museum. Cost to enter was 400¥ and we spent just under 2 hours there. Entrance was a little difficult to find because it's on a small street off the main road. Not recommended for small children but was a good place to learn a little more about Japan's history.

Thank Mumslie
This review is the subjective opinion of a TripAdvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC
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