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medication

London
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82 posts
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medication

Hi all

We leave on thurs (counting the hours!!) Just wondering if its ok to take perscriptions meds and painkillers in your hand luggage? I'm sure I read somewhere that they are quite tight on that sort of thing? ( I mean Maldivian immigration)

Thanks

Wibs

Bristol, United...
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326 posts
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1. Re: medication

Hi Firstmate Wibble.

I trust you are well and hope you have a fantastic holiday.

I'm not aware of any problems taking prescribed medication into the Maldives providing you have a copy of the original prescriptions. Some people ask for a Doctor's note. This should not be necessary unless you are carrying opiates (morphine related medicines) or needles, as a insulin dependent diabetic might need. If you do wish to adopt a belt and braces approach and ask your Doctor to write you a covering letter anyway, be warned your GP is quite at liberty to charge you for this. The charge will vary, but is usually £10 - £20.

On a slightly tangential note I thought I might tell you what Pen and I take abroad with us, to cover any illnesses developed when access to help might be difficult.

These are my permanent travelling companions:-

1). Paracetamol - mild painkiller. Probably the most taken medicine on holidays (usually for hangovers). Particularly necessary on Honeymoons, just in case the bride developes "a headache".

2). Ibuprofen - anti-inflammatory painkiller. Good for joint and muscle pains. Medical students swear by it for the morning after. Also helps take the sting out of sunburn. Therefore also useful on Honeymoons

3). Tramadol - strong painkiller. Maybe too strong for some and can cause nausea and a 'stoned' like feeling. Causes constipation in prolonged use. Doesn't get rid of the pain, but you can become so chilled you just don't give a damn.

4). Prochlorperazine - anti-emetic. Not only good for nausea associated with gastroenteritis, but also travel sickness and sea sickness. Ensures technicolour yawn free travel.

5). Domperidone - alternative anti-emetic. No real use for motion sickness. Also comes in suppositary form. Cue jokes about 'for all the good this medicine is doing me, I may as well stick it up my a***'.

6). Immodium - slows diarrhoea, but doesn't actually clear it up. Very useful if you're about to travel. But then so's a cork.

7). Ciprofloxacin - absolutely amazing gastro-enteritis medicine. THE best treatment for the Atoll Avalanche. Don't leave home without it.

8). Cetirizine - once daily anti-histamine for allergies and the itch of insect bites. Absolutely no use for love bites though. If you've got a hickey, I advise not going home for a week.

9). Co-amoxiclav - penicillin based broad spectrum anti-biotic. Which means it's good for many different infections, including those of the ear and skin. Not so good for Honeymooners as it interferes with the contraceptive pill and causes thrush. And potentially diarrhoea. A sure fire passion killer.

I hope this list is useful, but please do check with your own GPs that the above list is safe for you and doesn't interact with any of your regular medication.

Take care, DrMike.

Oxford, United...
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9,417 posts
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2. Re: medication

Hi FMW

I suffer from occasional kidney infections and back trouble and so whenever I go abroad I always take strong prescription painkillers and antibiotics in my hand luggage. I carry a copy of my Rx but have never had any problems. I always leave the pills in their original packs.

Hi DrMike

A most helpful post, as always. Scarily, I have nearly all of your recommendations in my medicine cupboard at home. I never travel without them! Mrs D thinks I am a galloping hypochondriac but I always tell her it is a classic example of "Sod's Law: if I take them on holiday I won't need them - leave them behind and I will!

OD

Lincolnshire...
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717 posts
305 reviews
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3. Re: medication

Dr Mike where have you been all the times I have needed you?

Always take a big bag of 'stuff' on holiday, hubbie thinks Im mad...

Any cures for flight hysteria????

england
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66 posts
4 reviews
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4. Re: medication

Chloramphenicol eye drops also useful and available without prescription for conjunctivitis and zovirax cold sore cream are two of my essentials

Stourbridge, United...
Destination Expert
for Maldives
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2,086 posts
33 reviews
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5. Re: medication

Hi

My husband takes prescription medicines and he has never had a problem, most is put in the hold luggage but the ones like blood pressure go in hand luggage just in case the luggage gets lost

regards susie

London
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82 posts
1 review
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6. Re: medication

Thanks everyone - esp Dr Mike

Will put all but essentials in the hold and the others in my hand luggage.

Only 2 days to go - whoop!!

Wibs

england
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66 posts
4 reviews
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7. Re: medication

Just remember if appropriate don't put insulin in hold luggage it may freeze

Wid
Wirral,England
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3,518 posts
16 reviews
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8. Re: medication

Aloclar for mouth ulcers.

Wid

Bristol, United...
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326 posts
7 reviews
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9. Re: medication

Hi rosieandjan.

I hope you are well.

I prescribe a small dose of Diazepam (Valium) for any of my patients who are scared of flying. Most seem to find it very helpful. You need to it take between one and two hours before take off, but be warned it can make you drowsy, so make sure someone is keeping an eye on the departures board, I'd hate you to miss your flight. I'd also recommend you refrain from alcohol if you do take it, as the effects can be unpredictable.

Hi fondriest.

I trust all is well with you.

Chloramphenicol is an excellent antibiotic for conjunctivitis. However to be effective the drops need to be taken every two to three hours for the first twenty four. The ointment is easier, only four times a day, but still a nuisance. The easiest antibiotic drops to use are Fucithalmic. They work just as well and need only be used twice a day.

I hope this is of help, take care, DrMike.

Leicestershire
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69 posts
13 reviews
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10. Re: medication

Thats some list!

We usually just take immodium, ibuprofen & saline pappettes. But it does make one think...