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Italian wines

Saskatoon, Canada
Level Contributor
13 posts
188 reviews
Italian wines

When I go to Rome next month, I'd like to sample a variety of Italian wines. I like wine and have some, but not a lot of familiarity with Italian wines. I was thinking a wine bar might be the best bet, since you can order by the glass. Since I don't have an unlimited budget, is the house wine usually a good choice in trattorias? I'd appreciate any suggestions on how to go about trying different wines, and where to start!

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Montreal
Level Contributor
17,790 posts
1. Re: Italian wines

There have been three threads today addressing your questions:

…tripadvisor.com/ShowTopic-g187791-i22-k3021…

…tripadvisor.com/ShowTopic-g187791-i22-k3021…

…tripadvisor.com/ShowTopic-g187791-i22-k3021…

Katonah, New York
Level Contributor
23 posts
96 reviews
2. Re: Italian wines

I am not a wine expert either, but can't think of a better place to start enjoying wines than Italy - they are excellent and relatively inexpensive. It is also one of the few places that the house wines are actually good. We often ask the waiter for a recommendation which is a great way to get exposed. Definitely try a Chianti Classico and a Brunello di Montalcino.

Mykonos, Greece
Level Contributor
558 posts
6 reviews
3. Re: Italian wines

I never met an Italian wine I didn't like. You will enjoy any and all, from the simplest table wine to an expensive bottle from a wine shop. We found a great little wine bar, that after our first visit we kept going back to and buying bottles to take back to our apartment. If you walk to the top of the Spanish Steps, then immediately look to your right, there is another set of steps going down the back way to the Piazza di Spagna... start walking down them, and partway down is a wine shop, you can't miss it. They have an extensive selection, and will make recommendations.

Saskatoon, Canada
Level Contributor
13 posts
188 reviews
4. Re: Italian wines

Thanks everyone for your useful advice and for pointing me to the previous threads. (Not sure how I missed those...) Very helpful.

Rome, Italy
Level Contributor
426 posts
4 reviews
5. Re: Italian wines

voyageur, wait for wine_gal_rome to answer your questions, she gives good advice on wines. I don't think she will approve of housewines. Also, if you are interested in learning about italian wines, you might be interested in a wine tasting with a sommelier. Search for vinoroma on TA (not the forums) and you'll find an excellent place - I used to live in Rome and have attended some tastings there, she is the best in Rome. or anywhere, for that matter.

rome
Level Contributor
2,339 posts
6. Re: Italian wines

lol, yes, I don't approve of housewines most often, but you can read about that on the other threads mentioned. And there is no way you are getting a Chianti Classico or Brunello as a housewine, that is not happening, sorry.

Going to a winebar is a good idea, you can order by the glass, usually they will cost 4-8 euros (remember, these are real wines, not housewines, so the prices are justified). There are some good ones where you will sure get fresh bottles, although as a sidenote I have to say there is nothing wrong with a bottle that was opened the day before (sometimes even longer), as the winebars keep them under different conditions than what is available to the normal consumer at home. But keep in mind that just drinking these wines won't help you too much (other than enjoying yourself, obviously), as you won't be able to learn anything.

A very nice winebar where you order by the glass is il Goccetto on via dei Bannchi Vecchi 14. Another one is al vino al vino in the Monti area. Bit more upscale is Roscioli on via Giubbonari. These are all open in september.

Verona, Italy
Level Contributor
3,530 posts
1 review
7. Re: Italian wines

I agree with the comment above about keeping a bottle open from the day before.

However, unfortunately not all wine bars do have the correct method and simply stick the cork back into the bottle nech letting air get in and spoil the wine.

Enomatic is a company that seems to be grwoing in this field and able to offer large selections of good wines by the glass.

What do you think of this process winegal?

To be honest when we open a bottle of wine it is rare that it makes it over to the next day?? lol

Katonah, New York
Level Contributor
23 posts
96 reviews
8. Re: Italian wines

I don't believe I indicated that you would get a Brunello or Chianti as a house wine Wine Gal - merely trying to share...

rome
Level Contributor
2,339 posts
9. Re: Italian wines

Sorry, I must have misunderstood, since your whole post was about the housewines are I thought you were still talking about them while mentioning Chianti and Brunello.

rome
Level Contributor
2,339 posts
10. Re: Italian wines

please ditch that extra "are".

Eco, there are some professional systems, yes, that hold open bottles fresh for even a month. Complete vacuum or inert gases are the most often used means. But even just buying an inexpensive set of "vacuum pump" and then keeping the wine in the fridge helps slow down the bad effects of oxygen and keep a wine fine for up to a week.