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Man-made Beaches in Jamaica

Cherry Hill, NJ
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Man-made Beaches in Jamaica

There has been discussion in another thread about the pros and cons of man-made beaches.

Which resorts in Jamaica have a man-made beach and what is good (or bad) about it.

Thanks!

Kingston, Canada
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1. Re: Man-made Beaches in Jamaica

Point Village. Guess they thought they should have one when they decided to build a resort since it was all rock before. Seems to have been successful :)

Some of the resorts on Long Bay that had their beach completely wiped out after Ivan and were rebuilt rather than wait for nature to do the recovery.

That's all I know.

Long Island, NY
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2. Re: Man-made Beaches in Jamaica

Good point. A lot of beaches in the Yucatan were wiped out and rebuilt. I guess they would be considered man-made. Any opinions on those?

tamworth staffs
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3. Re: Man-made Beaches in Jamaica

as far as i know the beech at holiday inn was man made

Hamilton, Canada
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4. Re: Man-made Beaches in Jamaica

Are the beaches at RDMD man made? They look it but are also attached to a beach on the other side of the fence so I was not sure?

La Mesa, California
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5. Re: Man-made Beaches in Jamaica

I would consider Bloody Bay's RIU Negril man made. There was some sand there but now it's a beach.

(ps. a hot girl sure got yanked quickly)

Birmingham/uk
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6. Re: Man-made Beaches in Jamaica

I believe Grand Lido Braco and Hedo 111

Hamilton, Canada
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7. Re: Man-made Beaches in Jamaica

Streamertail, I was looking for that thread to show my friend and it was already gone!! Wow, that was quick! (I dont think it was a joke either!) lol

tamworth staffs
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8. Re: Man-made Beaches in Jamaica

if they go with that attitude god help them

Central Ohio
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for Negril, Port Antonio
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9. Re: Man-made Beaches in Jamaica

Negril's main beach is natural BUT after Hurricane Ivan (and I am certain at other times as well) a lot of hotels took it upon themselves to put back what was washed away.

Footeprints, for example, did a lot of sandbagging and trucking in sand to their part in the time we were there about two weeks after the hurricane.

In Negril many buildings are too close to the water now, the beach has been receding there for while. Sand shifts all the time, some parts of the beach get wider, then narrower, then wider again, but overall it is shrinking.

Many beaches started off as completely natural but groynes were added to hold sand (Doctor's Cave in MoBay comes to mind).

I think artificial beaches can be very nice - if fine sand is brought in sufficient quantities there is no reason that they wouldn't be just fine for swimming...that is often the point, to make it nicer for swimming.

Stop reading here if all you want to know is that a hotel's beach will be nice for swimming if it is artificial or natural.

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OK, you decided to read on.....

The issue with artificial beaches and expansion of natural beaches is long term. Mangroves are like filters, water that runs off the land is cleaned in the wetlands and mangroves before getting to the sea. Fertilizers, effluent, dirt that comes with the water as it runs down hillsides and over streets, etc is removed before getting into the sea.

Removing that filter means more pollutants and silt and such get into the water (perhaps clouding it especially after storms) and onto the reef. When the reef is in contact with that unfiltered water, it begins to die.

Coral reefs can be damaged by more than tourist and residential development of course...hurricanes, warming waters, boats that anchor carelessly, divers/snorkelers touching, stepping on or taking coral, dynamite fishing, all do damage.

When coral reefs are damaged, the beach eventually is too. The reefs protect the beaches from big waves and storms, and when the reef dies or shrinks, it can't do that, so the beach (and sand) is much more susceptible to wave action, loss of sand, and damage to structures on the coast.

So making a beach today may be fine, but eventually - and eventually may be a long time - it will make that area less desirable as a vacation spot.

Hamilton, Canada
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10. Re: Man-made Beaches in Jamaica

Thanks for all the great info. It was very interesting!