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hand warmers

Reading, United...
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hand warmers

I'm thinking of taking handwarmers mainly 'cos it's a good way of keeping camera batteries from dying. However, the reusable ones I've seen all need to be put in boiling water to reactivate them and I'm not sure how easy this would be to do on the ship unless I take my own travel kettle? The alternative is to have non reusable ones but if I have a bundle of those they seem quite heavy and I'm trying to cut down on the weight limit as it is. Any ideas?

North Liberty, Iowa
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1. Re: hand warmers

I actually never really had issues with my batteries dying rapidly. If you just keep your spare in an inside coat pocket that should keep it warm enough to not have many issues.

Definitely take a spare battery! No matter how long your battery lasts it will always die at the most inopportune moment and you want to be able to switch to a new one quickly.

Boston...
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2. Re: hand warmers

I found handwarmers to be excellent for zodiac cruising and keeping with me overnight camping, but did not need them for regular landings and my extra batteries were fine in my inside pockets. Most of the disposable ones work 10 hours or so, so if you only pack one a day will it really add that much to your weight? I brought a dozen with me, and those little buggers made no difference in whether I went overweight or not (that ship had sailed very early on in my trip planning), but I was sure glad I had them the few times I needed them. I am not familiar with travel kettles, but there was always hot water available for tea/cocoa so maybe that would work? Personally I would choose to carry the extra weight then take up the space for a kettle if you bringing it is solely for the handwarmers. You could also shove the weight in your carry-on, my carry-on luggage was never weighed.

Reading, United...
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3. Re: hand warmers

Thanks for that. I definately think I need them for me if not for the batteries!! Did you have toe warmers too? Interesting to hear that you didn't have your hand luggage weighed - I am having angst about that too as with the camera gear I am way over the limit. Which airline did you fly down to Ushuaia? We are thinking of using LAN

Boston...
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for Walt Disney World, Orlando, Antarctic Adventures
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4. Re: hand warmers

I did not buy the toe warmers, I figured I could always just stick the handwarmers in my boot if needed, but between two pairs of socks and a fleece boot liner, I was good to go without the warmers.

I flew Aerolineas Argentina. They were sticklers on the checked luggage, but were just eye-balling the carry-ons. My carry-on was just a duffle bag though, that was completely within the dimensions provided on their website, so maybe my bag didn't warrant further inspection because I wasn't visibly "pushing it."

I have flown LAN internationally and they didn't check the carry-on weights either, but domestic flights could have stricter rules, not sure.

Reading, United...
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5. Re: hand warmers

The fleece boot liners sounds like a good plan. Thanks for your comments

Queenstown
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6. Re: hand warmers

Hi CandDy_11 - I had an experience on Macquarie Island where my battery was dying literally in 5-10 minutes due to cold (was fully charged when I left the ship).

I had a spare as I knew this could be the case. Keeping your camera tucked down your jacket, close to your body can help maintain battery life - however, as you want to get the camera out and probably keep the camera out to capture what you are experiencing , it is a very good idea to have a spare battery!

On the matter of hand warmers, most vessels will have a hot drinks station where you will be able to get coffee/tea and thus hot water to recharge your hand warmers if you choose to take them. Failing that, I know (on the smaller vessels at least) that the chefs/galley won't mind at all if you ask for some hot water to revive your warmers!

You bring up a valid point about keeping hands warm - there is nothing more painful/frustrating than cold extremities cutting a landing short or making you uncomfortable - so a good idea to pre-think how you will cope with this, especially if you are susceptible to the cold.

Reading, United...
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7. Re: hand warmers

thanks for that. We will be be on the Plancius which is one of the smaller vessels but I hadn't thought about asking the galley for hot water. I think that's what I will do though now you've mentioned it. I do suffer from the cold so anything I can do to keep me toastie the better!!!

North Liberty, Iowa
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8. Re: hand warmers

You might want to play with the reusable hand warmer at home a bit before you take one (or two). That way you'll know if it needs boiling water or just very hot water and about how long it takes to recharge.

<<<I do suffer from the cold so anything I can do to keep me toastie the better!!!>>>

If you get cold easily, I would highly suggest a base layer like Patagonia Capilene. Their heaviest weight (#4 on a scale of 1-4) is absolutely wonderful! Wickers is another brand that makes a fairly similar product. Capilene is not cheap, but if you look online a bit you can find it at a fairly decent discount (I think I ended up paying around half price). Silk is also great as a base layer.

What tended to make me cold was the wind so if you can focus on water proof outer layers, those will also be wind proof. Don't forget your hands! I used very light weight glove liners all the time since my main gloves were simply too bulky to handle my camera easily. That meant that when I stood out on the bow of the ship taking photos for an hour at a time, my hands got very cold. If you can find a pair of waterproof gloves that still give you enough dexterity to use your camera, you'll be a long ways towards staying warm.

Reading, United...
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9. Re: hand warmers

That's a good idea to try out the handwarmers first, I will definately do that. Thanks for the clothing suggestions too, I have got some "Heat Generating" long sleeved vests and polo neck jumpers from Uniqlo which are really thin, lightweight but are quite effective. I still have to source the gloves though, that's next on my list, I think it will be a challenge to find something that's going to tick all the boxes...

London, United...
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10. Re: hand warmers

Just read today about a New Zealander who made money selling Penguin handwarmers around 1900....