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Connecting in Europe (EU/Schengen confusion)

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Connecting in Europe (EU/Schengen confusion)

My apologies if this has been discussed elsewhere; I have been searching all over the Interweb for a definitive answer and my head is spinning.

We will be traveling from Canada to Ireland via Amsterdam (one ticket). My thinking is that, since Ireland is not part of the Schengen zone, our connection in Amsterdam is considered international-to-international - i.e. no customs/immigration until we get to Ireland (but possibly security and/or passport check in Amsterdam?) We are looking at a flight combo with a 1 hour 40 min layover in Amsterdam, which should be fine (in theory!) unless we need to do customs/immigration there.

We will have only carry on baggage, so checked baggage is not an issue.

Thank you in advance for your help!

10 replies to this topic
Brussels, Belgium
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1. Re: Connecting in Europe (EU/Schengen confusion)

You are correct that you will remain in international transit as long as you don't have to leave "airside" at AMS, which you won't if you don't have to collect hold baggage to check it in again (and travelling on one ticket, you wouldn't have had to do that anyway). You will also have been given your boarding pass for the second flight already in Canada.

Immigration IS passport control, and doesn't apply in Europe when in international (non-Schengen to non-Schengen) transit. Customs is not a Schengen but an EU matter and applies at final destination, i.e. DUB - if you had had any hold luggage, that is where you would have collected it, and there is no point in doing Customs controls before that. You will, however, have security checks before departure from AMS.

Amsterdam, The...
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2. Re: Connecting in Europe (EU/Schengen confusion)

Checked baggage would not be an issue anyway as it would be checked through to DUB. You will need to go through security just after you arrive but 1h40 is plenty of time to connect in AMS.

North American flights will arrive at pier E or F (or G) and Dublin flights from D so you will have about a 20 minute walk from gate to gate.

Oregon
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3. Re: Connecting in Europe (EU/Schengen confusion)

Are you sure arrivals from Canada have to re-clear security? I guess I would have assumed Canada, like the US, would be deemed a "secure" departure country and passengers would not need to re-clear security.

Amsterdam, The...
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4. Re: Connecting in Europe (EU/Schengen confusion)

Yes I am sure. I don't know why but only EU and flights from the US are determined sterile enough to enter without security checks.

Seattle, Washington
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5. Re: Connecting in Europe (EU/Schengen confusion)

Correct. Flights from Canada are not considered safe/sterile whatever that means.

Edited: 17 January 2018, 07:42
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6. Re: Connecting in Europe (EU/Schengen confusion)

Thanks, everyone!

Brussels, Belgium
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7. Re: Connecting in Europe (EU/Schengen confusion)

"Yes I am sure. I don't know why but only EU and flights from the US are determined sterile enough to enter without security checks."'

I didn't know flights from the U.S. WERE considered "sterile" (and I don't see how these flights could be separated from other flights from outside the EU/Schengen), but there is a very simple explanation as regards flights from the rest of the EU (which for practical reasons, may instead mean from Schengen..), which is that identical rules were applied at the first airport. I don't just mean "the same" as regards the content of the rules, but legally THE SAME, based in each of the countries concerned on the same EU law (or EEA/Schengen Agreement), directly applicable throughout the common territory, so these don't need to be applied twice. Whereas someone coming off a flight originating from outside the territory (and in my opinion that includes the U.S.) has been checked under different rules: not better, not worse, just different, i.e. not necessarily focussed on the same things and definitely based on a different legal instrument.

IF it is true that someone coming off a U.S. flight doesn't need to go through security at AMS when transferring to a flight to an EU country, whether Schengen (e.g. Belgium) or non-Schengen (e.g. Ireland, UK), this would have to be on the basis of a legal agreement between the EU and U.S. to recognise each other's security checks. And as the U.S. clearly doesn't recognise the EU's security checks, because anyone coming off a flight from the EU and transferring to another in the U.S. has to go through security, I don't see how that could possibly be the case.

Edited: 20 January 2018, 04:54
Sydney, Australia
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8. Re: Connecting in Europe (EU/Schengen confusion)

>>anyone coming off a flight from the EU and transferring to another in the U.S. has to go through security<<

But anyone coming off a flight from the EU to the US has to collect their luggage and exit the secure area, because the US does not have the concept of a transit passenger.

Stuttgart, Germany
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9. Re: Connecting in Europe (EU/Schengen confusion)

You might not see how they do it or agree with it but it is certain that flights from the US do not need to go through security they exit aircraft straight into departures as do UK flights

Oregon
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10. Re: Connecting in Europe (EU/Schengen confusion)

"this would have to be on the basis of a legal agreement between the EU and U.S. to recognise each other's security checks. "

I don't know that it has anything to do with an agreement between the EU and US. Schengen airports (and maybe EU airports generally) can each opt to accept security checks done in other countries if the other countries are deemed to be equivalent to EU standards. Most airports have not opted to do this routinely (if at all, see CDG) but AMS with its new (since June 2015) central security system, does in fact do this for flights from the US. Above I was somewhat surprised that Canada wasn't also considered equivalent, but I guess for whatever reason it is not.

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