History Museums in New Delhi

THE 10 BEST New Delhi History Museums

History Museums in New Delhi

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  • Things to do ranked using Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, photos, and popularity.

What travellers are saying

  • JenAnnie
    Nottingham, UK703 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    This was a beautiful place to visit a must if you are in New Delhi. We spent so much time here & had a guide to tell us all the details of Gandhi's stay here. Lots of photographs & memorabilia, cab recommended this visit.
    Written 3 May 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Baarish
    Mumbai, India556 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Interesting Tour of the Rashtrapati Bhavan Memorabilia . Many interactive displays. The tour guide was exceptional in her knowledge and made the display viewing more meaningful.
    Written 27 January 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • ghoomboom
    New Delhi, India107 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    This is a small Haveli in a small crowded street of Chandni Chowk In Old Delhi. It was here that Mirza Ghalib spent last nine years of his life. The visit takes you back 150 years in history and brings in mind the images when Ghalib would have lived here. Sheer delight. The place has now been converted into a small museum of sort where things related to Ghalib are kept and his poetry is written. I had visited Chandni Chowk so many times earlier but was not aware of this historical jewel in one of the alleys. Quite clean and calm, must visit if you love Ghalib and his poetry.
    Written 13 January 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • rishikochhar
    Amritsar103 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    This place situated just at the intersection of chanakyapuri and the teen murti road, is the former residence of first prime minister of India Mr. Jawahar Lal Nehru. this museum has room.
    Written 7 March 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India4,689 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The zenana, the women’s quarters at the Red Fort, spread over several palaces and contained many hundreds of ladies who were related to the Emperor: not just wives and concubines, but also other women who were under his protection, including aunts, cousins, daughters, nieces and so on, along with their hundreds of servants, maids, women soldiers, and so on. One of the palaces of the zenana that still survives is the Mumtaz Mahal, marked by scalloped arches with some remnants of paint work on the insides of the arches.

    Till some years back, the Mumtaz Mahal—its four sides then closed off by thick white-painted wooden walls—had housed a small museum. This has since been removed, and with it have gone the outer walls too. You can now see the palace as it might once have been, though of course without the decorations, drapes and more.
    Written 1 April 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • arpitam
    Gurugram (Gurgaon), India697 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Dr. A.P.J Abdul Kalam needs no introduction and so does his memorial needs no recommendation. One should pay visit (a way of paying homage) to our great leader and inspiration for the Indians. The place is very well maintained although there is no entry fee. Backpacks and camera are not allowed inside, but one can carry mobile which has to be switched off. The memorial is very organized with hundreds of photographs framed and walled depicting the work of the great leader and scientist. It also houses his personal belongings and showcases the last baggage he carried to IIT Shillong.
    Just one suggestion; all the photographs displayed here are having historical significance; so those really need appropriate captions for the visitors to comprehend.
    Written 25 March 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Culture00983260613
    1 contribution
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    It is amazing place where you can experience the indian culture and special thanks to Faisal Saleem who has informed about this place in heart of delhi 😊
    Written 7 February 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • macedonboy
    Glasgow, UK1,79,682 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    The National Charkha Museum is a museum exhibiting the history and evolution of humble spinning wheel, the Charkha. The museum is housed in the garden area in the middle of Connaught Place. The building itself is a one roomed Neoclassical building that completely white. I understand that the Charkha was important tool that Gandhi thought would be a point of national rejuvenation for India. The exhibits are beautifully exhibited, but there’s not much information and to be honest, I actually didn’t learn very much.

    The two steel sculptures on the grounds of the were more interesting. One is a lion made up of charkha wheels, the order a giant sculpture of a charkha wheel. The entrance fee for the museum is basically pocket change, so plus one star for that.
    Written 29 December 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • neha763
    397 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    This place is related to theatre. All about theatre items are kept as art in this museum or gallery.
    Written 29 June 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India4,689 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    This is one of four museums that have been opened in the Red Fort grounds recently in the former British barracks that dominate the fort. The Museum of 1857, as its name indicates, focuses on educating visitors about the uprising of 1857. Spread across several floors, the galleries cover interesting aspects of the uprising, from its causes to its spread, the way it was planned (with fascinating insights on how chapatis, red lotuses, tree bark and more were used to convey secret messages), how it played out, and how it was suppressed. The text and images are well-arranged: just enough text to explain, lots of large, interesting photographs, paintings, maps and more.

    There are separate galleries on how the uprising played out in different parts of India: in Lucknow/Awadh, for example; or the Ajnala massacre (a particularly brutal instance of how the British put down those who had revolted). There’s one gallery devoted completely to the uprising in Delhi, and this—besides the usual text and images—also has some artefacts, most of them belonging to the last Mughal Emperor, Bahadur Shah ‘Zafar’: a brocade robe, a pen holder, a powder horn, and so on.

    In order to be able to visit the museums within the fort, you need to buy a ‘monuments + museums’ ticket at the ticket counter: for foreigners, this costs Rs 950; Indians pay Rs 80. If you want to visit more than one museum, keep your ticket safe; you’ll need to show it at each museum you want to enter.
    Written 1 May 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India4,689 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    On April 13th, 1919, more than a thousand people—men, women and children included—had gathered at Amritsar’s Jallianwala Bagh to protest against the oppressive Rowlatt Act, recently passed by the British to clamp down on anti-Raj activities in India. To disperse the crowd, a contingent was sent in under General Dyer, who ordered his men to open fire. More than 1,500 people were injured; hundreds died, many of them by jumping into the well in the garden in an attempt to dodge the bullets.

    While Jallianwala Bagh marks this massacre, the newly-opened Yaad-e-Jallian (‘Memory of Jallian’) Museum in the Red Fort provides more context for the event. The museum is spread over several galleries, and though it’s not huge, there’s plenty of interesting stuff here, in the form of text (not too much, just enough to inform) in English and Hindi, as well as lots of images: photographs and so on. A large section is devoted to the backdrop: how India was suffering under the British, and how (especially) Punjabis had been sent to fight for Britain in the First World War (in fact, the insights into their experiences in the war, including ‘anthropological studies’ of Indian POWs by Germans; letters in Gurmukhi; photographs etc, are among the most poignant of the exhibits here).

    Well worth seeing. The museum also has a small replica of the memorial at Jallianwala Bagh.
    Written 1 May 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Mariam M
    London, UK11 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    I am deeply impressed with the establishment of this museum. The testimonials are truly inspiring, and I commend everyone who contributed their time and effort to create this valuable resource. The wealth of information presented here kept us engaged for two to three hours, and we could have easily spent even longer exploring its depths. The interactive elements add a compelling dimension to the experience. Thank you for sharing these stories and preserving these experiences. As we lose our elders, we often fear losing the rich history of our heritage and the sacrifices they made for us to be here. This museum stands as a testament to their resilience and serves as a beacon for future generations.
    Written 30 November 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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