Historic Sites in Chandni Chowk

5 Historic Sites in Chandni Chowk (New Delhi)

Historic Sites in Chandni Chowk

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What travellers are saying

  • Renan
    226 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The front gate is the most impressive part of this fort. The museums inside are ok. Teh baoli is nice, not the best you'll see in India. There are a few other buildings to see from the outside. Nice place overall
    Written 22 January 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India4,689 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Situated parallel to the Naubat Khaana/Naqqar Khaana, right behind it, is the Diwan-e-Aam of the Red Fort, the Hall of Public Audience. This is where the Emperor would have attended court where all the courtiers would have been present: he would have heard petitions, received ambassadors and emissaries from abroad, bestowed recognition on those who merited it, and so on.

    In Mughal times, the red sandstone pillars of the Diwan-e-Aam would have been covered over with limestone plaster polished to an alabaster-like finish, and would have looked vastly different from its more stark (yet still impressively symmetrical) appearance today. One of the highlights of this hall is the white marble throne pavilion that stands against the back wall, in the very centre. The back wall of this little pavilion is exquisitely decorated in pietra dura (coloured stone inlay work) depicting various birds, as well as the legend of Orpheus. Shahjahan is believed to have commissioned a Florentine jeweller named Austin of Bordeaux to create these panels.

    Sadly, because the pavilion is encased in thick glass, and it’s so high, it’s difficult to get a good glimpse of the details of this inlay unless you’ve come armed with a pair of binoculars or a camera with a good zoom lens.
    Written 1 April 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India4,689 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    St Stephen’s Church is part of the Church of North India (CNI) and is one of its oldest churches in Delhi, having been constructed in 1862. This is a really beautiful little church, painted a deep red and built in an Italian Gothic style, on Church Mission Road. To get to the church, turn right from Fatehpuri Masjid, go past Khari Baoli, and continue down the road until you reach the church, on your left. You can’t miss it.

    Visitors are allowed to visit the church, even on weekdays. A guard-cum-caretaker is to be found in the little cabin just inside the main gate, and he unlocked the church for us when we visited here on a weekday morning at about 10 AM.

    Inside, the church is as beautiful and well-maintained as it is on the outside. The pulpit and the baptismal font are old, marble; the plaques commemorating important church dignitaries and members of the congregation are gleaming, brightly polished brass; and the exquisite stained glass ‘rose window’ is one of its kind in Delhi.

    You can leave a donation in the poor box if you wish. Please note that photography is not allowed without the permission, at least, of the caretaker. Also, all footwear must be removed before entering the church.
    Written 1 May 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India4,689 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Razia Sultan (CE 1205-1240) was the only woman to sit on the throne of Delhi, having been named successor by her father, Iltutmish. Razia’s reign was a short one, since she had to battle a powerful clique of nobility at the court in Delhi, as well as external enemies. She was eventually defeated in battle and forced to flee, eventually dying in Kaithal, near Karnal.

    One would have expected Razia’s tomb, given that she was a Sultan, to be more impressive—and more close to where she had ruled (which would have been around the Mehrauli area). However, possibly because of the proximity of the tomb of the Sufi mystic Turkman Bayabani (the graves of holy people being believed to confer blessings on the area around them), she was buried here, fairly far to the north of where she ruled from.

    The tomb itself is unimpressive: instead of a domed roof (or any sort of roof), there is just a small walled enclosure with two cenotaphs, both made of random rubble masonry—no ornamentation, nothing to indicate that this is the last resting place of a Sultan. One grave is Razia’s, the other is unidentified but local legend has it that this is the grave of Razia’s sister Sazia. Beside the cenotaphs, to one side, is a small mosque which has been built fairly recently. If you’re entering the mosque area, make sure you remove your footwear.

    Getting to Razia’s Tomb is a little convoluted, but the locals are well aware of where it is, and how to get there: remember to ask for Bulbulikhana, which is the exact name of the neighbourhood where the tomb stands.
    Written 31 December 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India4,689 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Although tourist guides are fond of telling visitors that this was the palace where the Emperor would relax, being entertained by dancers (who would have adorned themselves by peering in the mirrors of the Sheesh Mahal next door), the truth is that this white marble palace might have been part of the zenana, the women’s apartments. It would have had water running through a shallow channel, with a fountain (which can still be seen) in the centre of the palace, and cool basements (tehkhaanas) underneath to which the ladies could retreat during the hot summer months. The Emperor, given that he did spend some time everyday in the harem, would probably have visited this palace, which adjoined his own chambers at the fort, but it may not have been for merely entertainment.

    Like most of the other palaces at the fort, this can only be seen from the outside, and that too from ground level.
    Written 1 April 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.