Points of Interest & Landmarks in Chandni Chowk

THE 10 BEST Points of Interest & Landmarks in Chandni Chowk (New Delhi)

Points of Interest & Landmarks in Chandni Chowk

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  • Things to do ranked using Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, number of page views, and user location.

What travellers are saying

  • Raymond S
    Melbourne, Australia175 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Nice bit of history.
    This was a beautiful place, but is in dire need of restoration, and requires your imagination to view what was of a bygone time.
    Over priced for non Indian people, about 100 times the price of what locals pay for entry.
    Make sure to bring water and food with you for little lunch picnic.
    Pay the extra to gain entry to all exhibits in the grounds.
    Written 16 June 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • jeff1955malaysia
    Taiping, Malaysia293 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The Lahorie Gate is a representation of the cultural, political and architectural majesty of the Mughal Empire left behind in india. Its a beauty to admire.
    Written 16 June 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • macedonboy
    Glasgow, UK1,85,732 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    Gali Paranthe Wali is a small street in the jam packed Chadni Chowk district. The street is famous for the number of restaurants specialising in Parathas, hence the name. Apparently, the likes of Jawaharlal Nehru, Indira Gandhi, and Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit have all visited this street and gotten a paratha meal. This was the only visit to this street in all my visits to Delhi and there’s certainly a lot of servings of parathas. I suppose it’s one of those iconic street food places like Curry Mile in Manchester. Not really my type of place, but at least I’ve visited once. As an aside, there’s also a restaurant namesake .. which I read is not very good.
    Written 17 February 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Debashis T
    Dehradun, India2,299 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    It is a lovely rectangular building constructed with marble is the place where emperor used to receive state guests and other important people. The trial of Bahadur Shah Zafar, the last Mughal ruler by britishers took place here. It was under construction at that time and visitors were not allowed to enter inside. Just enjoyed the look from outside.
    Written 9 May 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India6,320 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Situated parallel to the Naubat Khaana/Naqqar Khaana, right behind it, is the Diwan-e-Aam of the Red Fort, the Hall of Public Audience. This is where the Emperor would have attended court where all the courtiers would have been present: he would have heard petitions, received ambassadors and emissaries from abroad, bestowed recognition on those who merited it, and so on.

    In Mughal times, the red sandstone pillars of the Diwan-e-Aam would have been covered over with limestone plaster polished to an alabaster-like finish, and would have looked vastly different from its more stark (yet still impressively symmetrical) appearance today. One of the highlights of this hall is the white marble throne pavilion that stands against the back wall, in the very centre. The back wall of this little pavilion is exquisitely decorated in pietra dura (coloured stone inlay work) depicting various birds, as well as the legend of Orpheus. Shahjahan is believed to have commissioned a Florentine jeweller named Austin of Bordeaux to create these panels.

    Sadly, because the pavilion is encased in thick glass, and it’s so high, it’s difficult to get a good glimpse of the details of this inlay unless you’ve come armed with a pair of binoculars or a camera with a good zoom lens.
    Written 1 April 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Linda Y
    Frisco, TX5,691 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The Khas Mahal is one of the white marble buildings in the Red Fort and is included in entrance to the fort. It served as the emperor’s private apartment. The graceful scalloped arches, walls and ceilings are embellished with a delicate floral motif. Gorgeous carved marble screens! Look for the Scale of Justice, an important piece of Mughal art.
    Written 5 March 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India6,320 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Razia Sultan (CE 1205-1240) was the only woman to sit on the throne of Delhi, having been named successor by her father, Iltutmish. Razia’s reign was a short one, since she had to battle a powerful clique of nobility at the court in Delhi, as well as external enemies. She was eventually defeated in battle and forced to flee, eventually dying in Kaithal, near Karnal.

    One would have expected Razia’s tomb, given that she was a Sultan, to be more impressive—and more close to where she had ruled (which would have been around the Mehrauli area). However, possibly because of the proximity of the tomb of the Sufi mystic Turkman Bayabani (the graves of holy people being believed to confer blessings on the area around them), she was buried here, fairly far to the north of where she ruled from.

    The tomb itself is unimpressive: instead of a domed roof (or any sort of roof), there is just a small walled enclosure with two cenotaphs, both made of random rubble masonry—no ornamentation, nothing to indicate that this is the last resting place of a Sultan. One grave is Razia’s, the other is unidentified but local legend has it that this is the grave of Razia’s sister Sazia. Beside the cenotaphs, to one side, is a small mosque which has been built fairly recently. If you’re entering the mosque area, make sure you remove your footwear.

    Getting to Razia’s Tomb is a little convoluted, but the locals are well aware of where it is, and how to get there: remember to ask for Bulbulikhana, which is the exact name of the neighbourhood where the tomb stands.
    Written 31 December 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • ganshu12378
    Mangalore, India392 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    This is well known place of interest and wonderful landmark. It attracts a large number of tourists through out the year. Need to be maintained well by the authorities
    Written 21 July 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India6,320 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Although tourist guides are fond of telling visitors that this was the palace where the Emperor would relax, being entertained by dancers (who would have adorned themselves by peering in the mirrors of the Sheesh Mahal next door), the truth is that this white marble palace might have been part of the zenana, the women’s apartments. It would have had water running through a shallow channel, with a fountain (which can still be seen) in the centre of the palace, and cool basements (tehkhaanas) underneath to which the ladies could retreat during the hot summer months. The Emperor, given that he did spend some time everyday in the harem, would probably have visited this palace, which adjoined his own chambers at the fort, but it may not have been for merely entertainment.

    Like most of the other palaces at the fort, this can only be seen from the outside, and that too from ground level.
    Written 1 April 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Presna
    223 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    This place is now really in a very bad shape. It is being totally ignored. I cant imagine that this was once a great palace of historical importance.
    Written 30 June 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India6,320 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    When the Mughal Emperor Shahjahan shifted the imperial capital from Agra to Delhi in the 1640s, he built the fort and the imperial mosque, and a walled city—Shahjahanabad—beside the fort. Shahjahanabad was pierced by eleven gates; later, more gates were added. Today, only four of those medieval gates remain: Ajmeri Gate, Delhi Gate, Kashmiri Gate—and, the only gate not named for a city, Turkman Gate. While all the other gates were named for the city which they faced, Turkman Gate was named after a person: Shah Turkman Bayabani, who died in 1240 CE and was a Sufi mystic much revered in Delhi at one time.

    The gate itself has nothing to do with Shah Turkman Bayabani. However, the dargah of the saint is right next to the gate, which is why the name has been carried over to the gate as well.

    The gate is a solid one made of stone: it has formidable looking turrets on both sides, and a broad arched doorway through the middle. The arched section has some rudimentary ornamentation in red sandstone and grey quartzite, but the rest is all rough stone. A high railing surrounds the gate on all sides, with a gate to allow visitors in. The ASI’s guards are here, but you can go in and have a look. There’s not much to see inside the gate itself; it’s just the outside of it that’s fairly picturesque. No entry fee is charged.
    Written 30 November 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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