Landmarks/ Points of Interest in Chandni Chowk

Top 10 Points of Interest & Landmarks in Chandni Chowk (New Delhi)

Points of Interest & Landmarks in Chandni Chowk

  • Traveller favourites
    Things to do ranked using Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, photos, and popularity.
  • Traveller ranking
    Highest rated attractions on Tripadvisor, based on traveller reviews.
Types of Attractions
Sights & Landmarks
Sights & Landmarks
Traveller rating
Neighbourhoods
Good for
11 places sorted by traveller favourites
Things to do ranked using Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, photos, and popularity.

What travellers are saying

  • Kitty B
    Morley, UK292 contributions
    Stunning place to visit, and clearly seen around the local area, lot of walking.

    Around the fort you can see where the British used to govern. There are many ornate carvings in the stone and the areas inside have so much detail and style.

    *Note the price is usually more expensive for foreigners

    Written 23 June 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Naresh1936
    Mumbai, India366 contributions
    The paranthas ( pan fried Indian bread) stuffed with a variety of fillings, such as potatoes, I lentils and different vegetables, served wit Indian curries in paratha wali Gail is a rare delight.
    Written 25 April 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Debashis T
    Dehradun, India1,578 contributions
    There are two gates to enter Red Fort, one is Delhi Gate and the other is Lahori Gate. Among these Lahori Gate is the main entrance through which normally tourists enter to the fort. The gate got its name as it is orientated towards Lahore. The gate is three storied and the Prime Minister of India hoists the National Flag here in every year on Independence day.
    Written 9 May 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Debashis T
    Dehradun, India1,578 contributions
    It is a lovely rectangular building constructed with marble is the place where emperor used to receive state guests and other important people. The trial of Bahadur Shah Zafar, the last Mughal ruler by britishers took place here. It was under construction at that time and visitors were not allowed to enter inside. Just enjoyed the look from outside.
    Written 9 May 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Debashis T
    Dehradun, India1,578 contributions
    Diwan I Aam as the name suggested is the meeting place of Mughal Emperor with the common people to sort out their grievances. It is a hall, open in three sides and backed by set of rooms. The chair of Emperor or the Singhasana is still there in a glass room. There are some grass fields also there on which you can sit.
    Written 9 May 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Linda Y
    Frisco, TX5,194 contributions
    The Khas Mahal is one of the white marble buildings in the Red Fort and is included in entrance to the fort. It served as the emperor’s private apartment. The graceful scalloped arches, walls and ceilings are embellished with a delicate floral motif. Gorgeous carved marble screens! Look for the Scale of Justice, an important piece of Mughal art.
    Written 5 March 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India3,692 contributions
    Razia Sultan (CE 1205-1240) was the only woman to sit on the throne of Delhi, having been named successor by her father, Iltutmish. Razia’s reign was a short one, since she had to battle a powerful clique of nobility at the court in Delhi, as well as external enemies. She was eventually defeated in battle and forced to flee, eventually dying in Kaithal, near Karnal.

    One would have expected Razia’s tomb, given that she was a Sultan, to be more impressive—and more close to where she had ruled (which would have been around the Mehrauli area). However, possibly because of the proximity of the tomb of the Sufi mystic Turkman Bayabani (the graves of holy people being believed to confer blessings on the area around them), she was buried here, fairly far to the north of where she ruled from.

    The tomb itself is unimpressive: instead of a domed roof (or any sort of roof), there is just a small walled enclosure with two cenotaphs, both made of random rubble masonry—no ornamentation, nothing to indicate that this is the last resting place of a Sultan. One grave is Razia’s, the other is unidentified but local legend has it that this is the grave of Razia’s sister Sazia. Beside the cenotaphs, to one side, is a small mosque which has been built fairly recently. If you’re entering the mosque area, make sure you remove your footwear.

    Getting to Razia’s Tomb is a little convoluted, but the locals are well aware of where it is, and how to get there: remember to ask for Bulbulikhana, which is the exact name of the neighbourhood where the tomb stands.
    Written 31 December 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Presna
    225 contributions
    This place is now really in a very bad shape. It is being totally ignored. I cant imagine that this was once a great palace of historical importance.
    Written 30 June 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • ganshu12378
    Mangalore, India404 contributions
    This is well known place of interest and wonderful landmark. It attracts a large number of tourists through out the year. Need to be maintained well by the authorities
    Written 21 July 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Madhulika L
    Noida, India3,692 contributions
    When the Mughal Emperor Shahjahan shifted the imperial capital from Agra to Delhi in the 1640s, he built the fort and the imperial mosque, and a walled city—Shahjahanabad—beside the fort. Shahjahanabad was pierced by eleven gates; later, more gates were added. Today, only four of those medieval gates remain: Ajmeri Gate, Delhi Gate, Kashmiri Gate—and, the only gate not named for a city, Turkman Gate. While all the other gates were named for the city which they faced, Turkman Gate was named after a person: Shah Turkman Bayabani, who died in 1240 CE and was a Sufi mystic much revered in Delhi at one time.

    The gate itself has nothing to do with Shah Turkman Bayabani. However, the dargah of the saint is right next to the gate, which is why the name has been carried over to the gate as well.

    The gate is a solid one made of stone: it has formidable looking turrets on both sides, and a broad arched doorway through the middle. The arched section has some rudimentary ornamentation in red sandstone and grey quartzite, but the rest is all rough stone. A high railing surrounds the gate on all sides, with a gate to allow visitors in. The ASI’s guards are here, but you can go in and have a look. There’s not much to see inside the gate itself; it’s just the outside of it that’s fairly picturesque. No entry fee is charged.
    Written 30 November 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.