Religious Sites in Bukhara

Religious Sites in Bukhara, Uzbekistan

Religious Sites in Bukhara

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  • Jurgen B
    Brussels, Belgium2,852 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Since you can't get in, you might think that by looking at a picture you can see how it is. Think again. Standing in front of it, day or night, is something special.
    Written 20 June 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Jurgen B
    Brussels, Belgium2,852 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    This really is a grand building, and you can get a good impression from the entry hall, if you behave decently, but even better from the side entrance, where you can talk to students. From the doorway, that is. Don't wear hotpants like the stupid girl I saw doing. Respect the local culture.
    Written 20 June 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Jurgen B
    Brussels, Belgium2,852 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    I've seen better. Especially talking about the interior. The courtyard is superb though. And the facade too. Mihrab was disappointingly kitschy
    Written 20 June 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Jurgen B
    Brussels, Belgium2,852 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    The best madrassa in town. Why? For its facade? No. For its courtyard? No. But for the unrestaured beautiful little mosque where almost no tourist enters because it is the only room for which you need to pay and it is announced as the museum of woorcarving.
    Written 20 June 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • starlightShanghai
    Victoria, Canada4,602 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    This beautiful building is the former Maghak-i 'Attari Mosque, now a carpet museum. Didn’t bother going in. Just relaxed on a bench in the shade and tried counting the huge number of tourists all trying to squeeze into the place. Beautiful building and gorgeous surrounding area.
    Written 27 September 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Jurgen B
    Brussels, Belgium2,852 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The big one is closed. For restoration I suppose. The small one is free to entry and has some good shop inside (very expensive copper)
    Written 20 June 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Andrew M
    7,541 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The Baland Mosque is also known as the "upper mosque". We had heard that the interior was breathtaking, but it was unfortunately closed when we visited. It is a short walk from the town center on Mirdustim Street, then head south on Tinchlik Tor Street and on reaching the intersection with T. Zokhidov Street, the mosque will be seen. There are fir trees planted outside the gate, and the gateway is in the shape of a portal with a central arch on which there is a dome. There are columns on either side of the portal shape, which are topped by an arched cover which was also on the dome. Persian script and the use of blue and yellow designs was a prominent feature of the entrance area.

    The mosque had five exterior wooden columns which were similar to those used in Chinese Dungan mosques. It is said to have been built in the 16th century. The mosque was complimented by a small well with a tin grey roof. A new brick building was being constructed to the right of the mosque. There were plaques near to the entrance which stated the year of construction and the times of prayer, which are shown on clock faces. If you walk on the narrow road to the left of the mosque, there is a grape vine which provides shade.

    We were disappointed at not gaining entry to the mosque, but appreciated it's external beauty, particularly the sculpted columns. We were able to visit the Khalifa Khudoydod Jomeh Mosque which is a short walk west of this site on Bakhoristan Street which has similar wooden sculpted columns. If you are interested in sardobas, there is one at the rear of the Jomeh mosque and another at the nearby school compound. If you continue south on Havzi Nav Street, the Juibori Kalon Madrassah, Volidai Abdulaziz Khan Mosque and Karakul gate may be visited.
    Written 9 October 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Jurgen B
    Brussels, Belgium2,852 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    I took off my shoes, went in, took pictures of the nice, unrestored interior and when about to leave, two yound guys came in from the back and told me quite shocked to find me there that is was forbidden for tourists. My reaction: "Why?" ;-)
    Written 20 June 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • iris212
    Tel Aviv, Israel340 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    This once Madrasse is now a very nice carpet shop! Huge and very beautiful but still they are selling carpets here. Everywhere one goes in Bukhara there are street vendors! U can't get away from them!
    Written 27 October 2015
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Ramadama
    New Providence, NJ2,913 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Spectacular minaret built in 1106 AD. I loved the various patterns in the brick. It is especially beautiful at night...well worth the walk into this area.
    Written 10 October 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Andrew M
    7,541 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    The Namazgokh Mosque is one of the oldest attractions in Bukhara. It is located at the intersection of Namozgoh and Mukhammad Iqbol Streets. It is one of the oldest structures in Bukhara, and one of the few that survived the Mongol invasion in 1220. The site is probably most famous as the area from which Genghis Khan gave his famous speech stating," If it weren't your sins, would Heaven send you such a misfortune as I?". The mosque is an "open air" construction, and this may have been a reason why it survived the mongol fires, as it was in the middle of a field which is still the case today.

    The rear wall is first seen from the street, and was built between 1119-20 by the Karakhanids. It is 38 meters long and has two columnar supports built into the rear wall. The original dome is also visible from this area. The front of the mosque is divided into three chambers. the central chamber has the qibla wall and mihrab indicating the direction of mecca. The alabaster designs on the ceiling above were crumbling but still visible. The stalactite designs were still visible at the top of the mihrab, although not in good shape. The area above the mihrab was decorated with patterns that reminded us of a maze. These decorations are thought to have been added after the mongol invasion. Other glazed tiles were also added in the 13th century, but these have long since fallen off and we didn't find any evidence of them.

    The south chamber had the same alabaster decorations on the ceiling. The northern chamber was far more interesting, as to it's right is the slightly leaning staircase leading to the minbar. We thought that this was the most attractive feature of the old structure. Also in the northern chamber, just past the steps, is a recessed arched design, above which are a few blue glazed tiles. This section is considered by experts to be the oldest tile work in Bukhara. It is not in particularly good condition, as a few of the tiles are damaged or missing.

    The portal and arcades were additions by the Shaybanids in the 16th century, and seem a bit disjointed and out of harmony with the older section. The mosque was mainly used on holidays or for large meetings, as it was far from the town center. Muslims would pray here if they arrived in the town late and the city gates were closed. The ancient Namazgah gate is said to be a 10 minute walk north on Namozgoh Street, but we didn't have time to explore this direction. Other pre-Mongolian buildings which may be visited include the Kalyan minaret (1127), the Mosque of Magoki-Atari (late 10th to early 11th century) and the Samanid mausoleum (892-943).

    This is an area of many buses and transportation from the town center to Mukhammad Iqbol Street is quite easy. Nearby attractions in a north east direction include Central Park, the old Jewish cemetery, the Boba Poraduz Tomb and the Sheikh-Jalal gate.
    Written 15 October 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Andrew M
    7,541 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The Emir Alim Khan Madrasah is to the right of the famous Kaylon minaret. It is because it stands in the shadow of it's famous neighbour, that it is often overlooked. It is a fairly new construction, as it was built in the early 20th century during the reign of the last Emir of Bukhara, Said Mir Mohammed Alim Khan. It was constructed in 18th century style to match the nearby buildings, including the Mir-i-Arab madrassah and the Kalan mosque.

    The Portal is at the western section and has two narrow columns on either side. The decorations are a mix of small dark and light blue tiles which are a common sight in Bukhara. A wavy design of the same colours was used on the underside of the arch. The doors seemed to be the original wooden type, and above the doors was a star shaped design of blue lines. The doors were unfortunately closed when we visited. We thought that this building was unique in Bukhara, as the rear of the building was a Madrassah, which is used as a public library for children, and the newer section at the front used to be a bath house.

    The bath house area has three domes which are topped by screened windows for ventilation and light. If you walk to the north west entrance, the interior of one of these rooms may be seen, as it is now a souvenir shop. Great photos of the madrassa with domes and the Kaylon minaret can be taken from the southern entrance of the square. This site is not a must see, but we thought a unique construction amongst the many madrassas of Bukhara.
    Written 9 October 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Andrew M
    7,541 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The Khalifa Khudoydod complex is located at the intersection of Khalifa Khudoidod and Charmgaron Streets. Our hotel was located on Mirdustim Street, so we turned right on Shaftizolar Street to reach this site. It was early in the morning, and the dome on the mosque was our first sighting. The dome was constructed of brick and had brick edges protruding as "points" at regular intervals. The dome was topped by a screen section with a blue cover. The screen allowed for air circulation and light entry into the mosque below.

    The exterior walls were decorated with arch shaped designs and blue tiles with Persian script above them. A few of these tiled spaces were empty. The main entrance had a brick constructed iwan with a beautiful white honeycomb decoration under the archway. A red topped minaret was to the left of the gate. The small mosque, had beautifully sculpted wooden columns on the outside. A green notice was near to the door showing the five times of prayer. There was a well to the right front area of the mosque.

    To the right side of the mosque was a beautiful brick sardoba. It had a covered screen on the sardoba dome, and also on either side of the entrance vault. The sardoba was designed exactly as the roof of the mosque, with the protruding edges of bricks spaced around it as a design. We descended the stairs through the wooden double doors, and took photos of the interior. There were vaults with coffins along the interior walls, and a few were left open.

    Khalifa Khudoydod studied at the nearby mir-i-arab madrasah. He was born in Urgench, but settled near the Pirmast Canal in the Navoi region, where he built a khanqah (muslim dormitory). He was invited to Bukhara in 1785 by Emir Shah Murad , when the Emirate of Bukhara was created. The mosque, 40 room khanqah and sardoba was built the following year. He created a trust for each building, but died in 1798. The Emir Haydar was one of the many dignitaries attending the funeral. Khudoydod has a grave near to the khanqah and other famous clerics were also buried here. The complex was closed and destroyed during Soviet times, but reconstructed after independence.

    Other attractions nearby include the Khoji Mir ali Mosque which is a short walk south on Charmgaron Street. This is the only Shia mosque in Bukhara and the powder blue dome can be seen from far away. If you head north to Bakhoristan Street, another Sardoba can be found on the school grounds. If interested in sardobas, there is another at the old Jewish Cemetery on Ibrokhim Muminov Street, but this will probably require a bus ride.
    Written 14 October 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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