Places to visit in Balnarring

Top Things to Do in Balnarring, Australia

Places to Visit in Balnarring

Top Attractions in Balnarring


*Likely to sell out: Based on Viator’s booking data and information from the provider from the past 30 days, it seems likely this experience will sell out through Viator, a Tripadvisor company.

What travellers are saying

  • awarrJP
    Melbourne, Australia16 contributions
    It was a very friendly, down to earth experience. Great to have Kathleen Quealy running the tasting who shared her passion for the vineyard. There was a wide range of wines reasonably priced. We went on to Stonier for their Pinot Diversity tasting but the best red of the day was the Quealy Musk Creek Pinot Noir for my money which blew me away.
    Written 6 January 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Giorgio B
    Reggio Emilia, Italy4 contributions
    I decided with my wife to visit the museum so I called and proposed to visit. The reply was positive. ID is necessary, but apart from that formality we were conducted through the Australian Navy history by the Commander of the museum. I definitely recommend this visit for the historical value and the kindness and hospitality that met us.
    Written 15 January 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Peter S
    Rome, Italy3,460 contributions
    Review covers Balnarring Beach

    The Balnarring Beach community is 2 km from the main township and located next to the beach - one of the adjoining beaches making up the Western Port Bay that envelopes French Island to the east. French Island is hidden around the headland, but immediately opposite – say 10 km away - is Phillip Island. The beach provides a ringside seat to the maritime beauty of the surrounding sea- and landscape,
    You take the turning off Library Road at the corner close to the Tulum Café/Store, pass the concrete shelter on your left and, further round, the public toilets and park around the back. Be aware, parking places are strictly limited. You’ll see the short pathway that heads towards the beach. The sign at the point where the sand starts says ‘Balnarring Beach’.
    Of a clear night the lights of Cowes beckon. But … look upwards and outwards – it’s the night sky that dominates with the sweep of the galaxy(ies) out there – those thousands of white pinpoints that help relate you to your place within that great equation … well, providing some kind of perspective. Take some deep breaths and appreciate the pristine nature of the oxygenated sea air – all those millions of tiny sea plants out there keeping you (and me) alive.
    Sure, you can walk along the sea-shore at night particularly if the tide is out and you’ve access to the flat sands next to the water – it’s easier walking - but the views are all around you. They are best shared standing and looking with just your imagination for company and/or with your family – that you can relate those stories of space fiction, of the recent history of space exploration and/or simply tease the imagination of those five, six or seven year old kids that accompany you. Some of them (or their descendants) may actually end up going there.
    During the day if the weather is on your side, the beach beckons for the pleasure of sand, surf and/or more appreciation of the geography of the lay of the coast, the hinterland of Merricks Creek and associated wetlands and, next to Balnarring Beach, the 70 ha forest reserve. You’ll need some kind of sunshade for protection, and you’ll need to keep your eyes on those little kids … the nearest life-guard facility, according to the sign board, is at Point Leo a further 5 km westwards around the coast … so too far to walk those kids.
    During our w/e camping the sea was … well … COLD (note the capitals) and definitely wetsuit country - a place to swim/play/exercise on the surface; there was nothing to see below.
    The shallow sweep of the bay shows the beach at its best and, the best way to appreciate the elegant beauty of the place, is to walk the beach – slowly. Of an early morning this is the domain of those exercising horses – you’ll probably miss them, but you’ll continue to fall into their hoof prints and or stumble over the rough surface they’ve left behind. Again, if the tide is on the way out catch that flat hard-packed sand next to the water’s edge. If you’re walking east along the 4 km of beach from Balnarrring to Somers – you’ll follow the hoof prints 60% of the way to the sign that says: ‘No horses passed this point’. Fortunately, the horses can read and the hoof prints stop there.
    The beach is shallow and wide and, rises on the landward side through low dunes that have been replanted to stabilize and to provide protection for nesting sea birds. Signs warn and inform you, and request that you and your dog do not venture on to these dune lands.
    What we did not see from the beach this camping w/e was the resident pod of dolphins that are sometimes seen along this stretch of shoreline. We’ve seen them before and watched their interaction with people who wade or float out on boards. There are pictures/rules/words on signs that tell you ‘This is what you do when the dolphins are there’, but the boards are all on shore and you can’t be certain of what the dolphins may know about these things.
    Closer to Somers there’s the point where Merricks Creek crosses the beach (or doesn’t). Presumably, most of the water is discharged – when in surplus - beneath the surface, and you can comfortably continue across the sand without removing your street shoes. You’ll meet the point where stone dykes, walls, barriers, wire and similar have been constructed in an effort to minimize the erosion of the headland; here’s where you climb those convenient wooden stairs and track inland for 100 m behind the handful of vulnerable houses/buildings overlooking the sea walls; and then return to the foreshore – covered in seaweed - beneath the steep slopes of the Somers Foreshore Reserve. There were a dozen small sail boats out at this point during our walk. Then there is the climb up more steps before exiting the car park and heading into Somers General Store/Cafe for coffee and/or lunch - it’s right opposite the beach access stairs.

    Peter Steele
    04 March 2021
    Written 5 March 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Shane T
    Brighton, Australia84 contributions
    A really beautiful place but just needs a lift in service level. The menu is limited which is fine but when the only 2 items ordered aren’t available- that’s not good enough.
    Written 10 October 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • paigib
    Melbourne, Australia42 contributions
    We've visited all of the farm yards on the Peninsula, and Rain Hayne & Shine is one of our favourites. It's extremely hands on, you're able to hold and feed a variety of farm animals. In my opinion, it's not somewhere I would sit and have a picnic lunch. It's best to spend about 45 minutes to an hour enjoying all the sights & sounds of a real working farm.
    Written 28 April 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • beckany
    Greater Melbourne, Australia107 contributions
    We’ve walked the path before and enjoyed taking in the sights and the range of habitat so hoped to explore with our new dog. We arrived with her to discover no dogs allowed. Not a problem but thought it best to share here as I couldn’t find any information about that anywhere else. We walked elsewhere today but wikl be back.
    Written 7 June 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • platypus150
    Melbourne, Australia24,622 contributions
    I have encountered this trail in a number of locations, including Hastings and Somerville. Much of it follows the Vline railway line between Frankston and Stony Point. Today I was at Somerville and was impressed with the maps on display showing the route and the points of interest along the way. You can follow it for a short or long way depending on how you feel. Much of it is hard paved.
    Written 17 March 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • EndlessTravels
    Greater Melbourne, Australia35,310 contributions
    Not the biggest or best playground, but it’s location across from shops and the fact it’s fully fenced makes it a handy little spot. Also has an amazing skate park.
    Written 9 August 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Wardy
    Melbourne, Australia553 contributions
    A fantastic place just to hang out with family and friends... BBQ's are great and great beach access.
    Written 16 August 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Helen W
    Melbourne, Australia40 contributions
    A must do experience on the Mornington Peninsula, so many things I didn’t know about and I live in Melbourne. Arthur’s knowledge and stories were fantastic, not to mention the comfort in his large van as he chauffeured us around. From pick up to drop off he was engaging, funny and entertaining. We started with berries to refresh the palette before a stunning beach brunch of local treats. So many great wineries and a feast for lunch followed by some more wineries. Arrived back at our accommodation with no capacity to eat or drink anything else. Arthur kindly packed in all our purchases along the way and even unpacked them into our car at the end of the day. We are still enjoying the wines almost a year later. Will do again when we have special guests in town.
    Written 14 February 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • TheScottsSydney
    Sydney, Australia88 contributions
    Elan Vineyard and Gallery is now proudly featuring an art gallery and it is well worth a visit.

    ElanVineyard is a small family winery run by Selma Lowther and her husband Jonothan - lovely couple and lovely wines - the vintage sparkling is spectacular as is the unique Gamy.

    The Art Gallery features Artist in Residence Russell Scott (my husband) and he has just opened his gallery on site. Bright, colourful abstract paintings displayed in a first class gallery.

    It is well worth a visit.
    Written 9 December 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.