Obakusan Manpuku - ji Temple

Obakusan Manpuku - ji Temple

Obakusan Manpuku - ji Temple
4.5
The area
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Neighbourhood: Southern Kyoto
Southern Kyoto has a reserved air. Though the Fushimi Inari Shrine is one of Kyoto's major tourist attractions, the surrounding nature, parks, gardens, temples, and shrines provide less-visited spaces for strolling and reflection. The Fushimi Inari Shrine itself is made up of 32,000 sub-shrines, and the mountain they are dotted across beckons hikers, picnickers, and lovers of the outdoors. Many of the mountain's off-set paths aren't frequented by tourists, and the mountain's serenity can be enjoyed at a leisurely pace. Southern Kyoto is the place to enjoy being outside, and to pay your respects to the ancient architecture and gods of the land that are celebrated here.
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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles154 reviews
Excellent
77
Very good
66
Average
11
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AyaHawaii
United States1,924 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019 • Friends
On 1661, a Chinese monk, Ingen, open the temple. He used his mother temple’s name for the new temple in Japan. That is why style of the temple related with Chinese culture a lot. Specially, “Fucha Ryori”, Chinese style Kaiseki menu is so beautiful and tasty even though vegetarian foods. Full course is around
¥8,000, but they offer to us private room which locates in front of nice Japanese garden. I want to come back other season, too. You need to walk a lot from entrance so please wear comfortable shoes. 5 minutes from JR Obaku station. Very good to place meditation. Must go for Kaiseki lover.
Written 29 June 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

petertaylor57
Auckland Central, New Zealand414 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019 • Solo
Just love this one! Far enough out of the way not to be swamped with tourists, the focal point of this large complex is the main hall with its Chinese style veranda and lounging, smiling, golden image of the Buddha. On the wall, there is a fish shaped wooden gong used for calling the monks to prayer. Very atmospheric considering it isn't an ancient temple (1661?) and unspoilt by the few intrepid tourists that make it this far.
Written 14 June 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Cheryl v
Halifax Regional Municipality, Canada18 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2018
A very grand temple a short walk from the Obakusan train station on the JR Nara line. The grounds are expansive and visitors can get English information. Well worth a visit if you are aroud Kyoto!
Written 3 December 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ART196
244 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2016 • Solo
Manpukuji is a huge Zen temple complex with 23 halls and connecting cloisters dating to the Mid-17th century. Manpukuji has very heavy influences from Ming China, such as the temple’s layout and teachings, and I was struck particularly by the many Chinese-style gates found throughout the temple. The temple was founded by Chinese Zen (Chán) master Ingen Ryūki (Yǐnyuán Lóngqí), and to this day has Chinese-derived customs such as vegetarian cuisine called Fucha-ryōri and Chinese-style tea ceremony, Senchadō. Even though the temple is very big, it does not seem to attract many visitors, but is in Uji, so it can be a very quieting experience to come here after fighting the crowds at Byōdō’in, as I did.
Written 21 April 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

colin_matthew
Singapore, Singapore849 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2016 • Solo
Manpuku-ji is on the hill-side, about 10 to 15 minutes' walk from JR Obaku. While it is a few times the size of the Byodo-in complex, it gets much fewer visitors. Great if you want to wander around a Buddhist temple complex and avoid the crowds!
Written 14 February 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Chuzaa
Vancouver, Canada3,491 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2015 • Couples
When you are planning to spend a day in the Uji region of Kyoto to visit the Byodo-in Temple, try to include this unique Chinese temple in Kyoto. It’s less than five minutes on foot from JR Obaku Station (or Keihan Obaku Station). The Obaku stations are located one stop (JR) or two stops (Keihan) before reaching respective Uji stations, if you are travelling from Kyoto.

A Chinese monk called Ingen(隠元)travelled to Japan and arrived in Nagasaki in 1654. He founded the Sofuku-ji Temple(崇福寺)there and then travelled to Kyoto to open this temple in 1663. Though it doesn’t look like a large complex from outside, in fact it is. The temple buildings are uniquely Chinese-shaped and the building layout of the complex is said to be after the late Ming Dynasty style. It is definitely worth a visit.

Ingen, the founder of the temple, is also known to be the one who brought from China to Japan a variety of vegetables; they include green beans (called commonly in Japan ”Ingen-mame” or Ingen’s beans) and water melon.

The temple is known for spreading the idea of drinking tea amongst ordinary people in a more simple way of brewing dried green tea leaves in hot water, instead of using green tea powder, during the Tokugawa Period.
Written 26 September 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

nakajimah
Bagneux, France1,025 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2015 • Solo
Not far from Kyoto, nevertheless there is a temple of which atomosphere is quite different: quiet, restful and unusual. The temple is Obakusan Manpukuji in Uji, near stations Obaku of a JR-line and a Keihan-line. The temple is the main temple of Obaku-shu, one of the three zen branches, founded in 17 century by an invited chinese monk Ingen Ryuki. The temple is a copy of chinese temple of the Ming period. Different buildings and their inscriptions (writings) bring you in an ancient chinese temple and you may feel exotic atomosphere.
I have visited here twice and twice for practicising zazen of the introductory course. It needs a reservation. It was done in the Hohdoh and lasted about one hour with two sessions of 15 minutes, an explanation of techniques and hohwa (on the Buddhist philosophy).
After zazen, I have lunched at the restaurant of the temple where one can enjoy the Futcha cooking, dishes of chinese zen temple, similar to the shozin cooking. I appreciated its taste. I found that doing zazen and having a lunch here were highly compatible.
Written 25 May 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Paul E
Philadelphia, PA83 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2013 • Business
This temple was built in Uji (near Kyoto) by the influential zen Buddhist monk Ingen around 1660 and named for a temple he had trained in in China. It has unusual features for a Japanese temple, with much Chinese styling. The monks serve a delicious vegetarian lunch (this has to be reserved). The temple was quiet and uncrowded when I was there.
Written 16 June 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

yew_djinn
London, UK24 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2012 • Solo
This temple was built in Ming Chinese style, it's like travelling to China while still in Japan. I went there during Summer so the pink lotus were in full bloom, besides, it was a very hot day and I was the only person around. I felt as if I were inside a dream. Gorgeous.
Written 25 January 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

道中双六
Osaka Prefecture, Japan845 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2024 • Friends
On the way to Uji to see the flowers with my cousin and his wife who came all the way from Tokyo to Kyoto, we stopped off for some fucha cuisine at Manpuku-ji Temple.
The flowers around Hojo-ike Pond were approaching their peak.
We had a special fucha meal at Koryukakaku in the back. The Obaku tradition of "plated dishes" has been revived after being discontinued for a while. The food is beautiful to look at and all tastes light. It's the healthiest food you can imagine. I was "full" - no pun intended.
Google
Written 6 April 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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