Karakus Tumulusu
Karakus Tumulusu
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as waiting time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Popular mentions

4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles71 reviews
Excellent
25
Very good
35
Average
10
Poor
1
Terrible
0

Ronald L
Denver, CO2,901 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2022
Visited Karakus Tumulus. This is a monumental tomb for three women. Built in the 2nd century by King Mithridates II of the Commagene civilization for his mother, sister, and daughter. Three columns remain today. Can walk around the monument in a half
hour and read about each of the columns.
Written 11 October 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

rftu
Newry, UK1,043 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2022
A monumental tomb to the Queen or other Royal member of the Commagene Royal family. There are four remaining 9 to 10 metre columns with a bull, lion and eagle statues.
Written 5 June 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Erhan Yildirim
Türkiye2,380 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2020 • Friends
The tumulus belonging to the royal queen and princesses of the kingdom of Commagene, built by Mithridates II, son of the magnificent king of Commagene I antiochos. 1 is the sacred burial site of Antiochis, the wife of the antiochus, isias daughters Antiochis, laodike and Antiochis daughter aka (hierothesion).
the Karakuş Tumulus is an artificial mound, 35 meters high, located on the top of a natural hill. Its Turkish name means "Black Bird", and its origin is explained by the column standing at the tumulus, the top of which is decorated with the sculpture of an eagle. It welcomes visitors to the tumulus, arriving there by the path from the south.
hierothesion that appears in the above inscription. It comes from ancient Greek and literally means a "sacred seat". In the Kingdom of Commagene, this term was used to describe royal mausoleums. In particular, it was reserved for three burial sites: the hierothesion of King Antiochus I on Mount Nemrut, the hierothesion in Arsameia, erected by Antiochus I to his father, King Mithridates I Kallinikos, and the Karakuş Tumulus hierothesion. This last mausoleum was built by King Mithridates II, the son of Antiochus, for the women of his family, as we could read in the inscription quoted above.
King Mithridates II ruled in the years 38 - 20 BCE and therefore the creation of Karakuş Tumulus is dated to this period. The figure of the ruler is visible on a relief placed on the column standing on the north-western side of the mound. This relief depicts Mithridates II shaking hands with his sister Laodice. However, some researchers, including T.A. Sinclair, claim that the person accompanying Laodice on the relief is not the Mithridates, but Isias - the mother of Mithridates and Laodice.
The presence of Laodice on a relief placed on Karakuş Tumulus indicates that she was also buried in this family tomb. Laodice was married to the King of the Parthians, Orodes II, becoming the Queen of the Parthian Empire. It was during the reign of Orodes II that the Roman army suffered a devastating defeat at the Battle of Carrhae - that is, the present Harran - in 53 BC. As a result of this defeat, the Roman commander Marcus Licinius Crassus, a member of the first triumvirate and most probably the wealthiest Roman of that time, lost his
life. Roman reports say that the Parthians poured molten gold into his mouth as a symbol of his thirst for wealth. His head was sent to the Great King Orodes II and was allegedly used as a prop on the stage during the performance of Euripides' Greek tragedy The Bacchae.

Originally, many more columns surrounded the mound. They stood in three rows of three columns each, on the eastern, southern, and north-eastern side on the tumulus. The central column of each group supported the relief block, and the two outer columns - the sculptures of animals - the deer on the eastern side, the eagle on the southern side, and the lion - on the northwestern side. However, they were demolished and used to build the nearby bridge of Septimius Severus, now known as Cendere Köprüsü, at the end of the 2nd century CE.
Written 11 October 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

bimblingaroundturkey
Ankara, Türkiye48 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2019
It was our first stop on our way to Nemrut mountain. We didn't have any specific expectations; maybe because of that we were amazed by the columns and the reliefs on them on top of a hill facing a great scenery of countryside.
Written 5 December 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

AndPancho
Brisbane, Australia1,447 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2018 • Couples
Worth stopping while touring the area.
Basically several columns positioned around a hilltop.
Half hour to walk around.
Some pretty views of the countryside from here.
Visited here on 9th October 2018.
Plenty of parking available.
Written 23 November 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Wayne P
Sydney, Australia301 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2018 • Solo
Worth a quick visit on the way up to Mt Nemrut. Stretch you legs with a walk around the burial mound and take a few shots of the pillars.
Written 30 June 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Adana airport rentacar travel transfer
Adana Province, Türkiye780 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2018 • Couples
It is 15 km dar away from kahta/adiyaman.cendere bridge,old kahta castle closed.35 km distance to the nemrut mountain.
You can find daily tours all these adress . You can see nemroud mountain at this karakuş tumulus hill .
It is monument for Commagene royal family .king mithrades and hoş sisteme Laodike and his sister Antiochis and his niece Aka
Written 26 February 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Rod F
Royal Wootton Bassett, UK2,054 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2016 • Couples
We had visited this in 2009 when you could still ascend the monument, but it is now out of bounds. It has some interesting columns, notably one of a dexiosis (handshaking) and is dedicated to Laodike. The others are the bull column for isas, and one column is for Antiochis and Aka. Visited in May.
Written 23 May 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

CasRijvers
29 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2015 • Friends
Compared to Nemrut Dağı Kara Kuş is potentially a little underwhelming. It, like Nemrut dağı, is a tumulus and is supposedly the twin burial mound to Nemrut dağı which just can be made out if the weather is good.
Written 14 June 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Chinapjs
Washington DC, DC3,635 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2015 • Family
The driver lets to off right at the base. Stunning views of the river valley. Interesting walk around to see the various statues. It's the first stop in a swing around the areas archeological sites that can be arranged for very little at the hotel
Written 21 November 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Karakus Tumulusu - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024) - Tripadvisor

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