Central Thermae
Central Thermae
4.5
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as waiting time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles41 reviews
Excellent
28
Very good
10
Average
3
Poor
0
Terrible
0

macedonboy
Glasgow, UK1,85,717 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2019
This area contains the buildings of the central baths of Herculaneum. The baths and spas occupy quite a large area. Interestingly, the baths had a male and female section and the latter has a pretty mosaic of Triton. Quite a lot of the salient features of the baths have been preserved such as shelves for visitor belongings, the caldarium of the male steam rooms, the apodyterium of the female and several mosaics including the aforementioned Triton.
Written 23 May 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Brun066
Florence, Italy13,213 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2022
Of all the buildings in the cities buried by Vesuvius in AD 79, the public baths are perhaps the most interesting. And these from Herculaneum are no exception.
In fact, in a world like the classical Greco-Roman one, incomparably poorer in technical devices than we are, the baths are among the most elaborate devices that can be experimented with. The works of supply and distribution of water in the various rooms (in the case of these baths of Herculaneum, the aqueduct, but in an earlier age a well, with devices for lifting water); the ovens for burning wood, the ducts for conveying the hot air into the "hypocausts" under the floors supported by "suspensurae", and thus heating both the water and the air; the stucco ceilings in the shape of a "strigil", to prevent the dripping of condensed humidity and instead convey it towards the walls: everything speaks to us of relatively complex techniques, perfected over the centuries.
As for these Baths of the Forum of Herculaneum, they stand out for the extraordinary state of conservation of the water tanks, as well as the apodyteria (changing rooms), with the stucco ceilings mentioned above and the shelves for storing the customers' personal belongings (similar in this at the central baths of Pompeii). And then for some beautiful mosaics, which depict, in the women's section, a Triton surrounded by Mediterranean marine fauna; and in the men's section, some symbolic objects within boxes.
Overall, the baths of the Forum seem to me one of the most evocative corners of ancient Herculaneum.
Written 2 April 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Tom J
London, UK1,698 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2019 • Couples
So whilst exploring Herculaneum we come across the central baths. Finally uncovered in 1931 this area is divided into the men’s and women’s sectors and was traditionally fed by a large well.

The fact you can walk through a dressing room from 79AD and then into a cold bathing room before visiting a warm room complete with mosaic of Triton among dolphins, squid and cherubs is truly remarkable.

The women’s sector was my favourite with the initial dressing room and the final version of the Triton mosaic replicated in the men’s section. Leading into the warm room complete with a meandering mosaic floor. The final vault is the hot room complete with 2 marble seats in white and dark red and a bath on the right hand side.

These baths have been locked in 79AD for almost 2000 years and we are still building baths / spas today to look like these, it is amazing!
Written 27 July 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

wendyanddavid536
Solihull, UK2,124 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2018 • Couples
One of the places that we had really looked forward to seeing in Herculaneum, but sadly it was closed on the day that we were there. At least in Herculaneum, there are nowhere near so many places closed as in Pompeii.
Written 28 May 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

LoveToTravelTerrie
Frisco, TX1,304 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2019 • Friends
I enjoyed learning about this place on our guided tour, we got a little insight into social life back in the day. The mosaic tiles were pretty amazing. It was another different, interesting place in Herculaneum.
Written 14 June 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

MalcH
Loughborough, UK2,861 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2018 • Couples
One of the places we wanted to see but although the courtyard was visible they seemed to be working on the inner baths so not possible to have a good look around. Shame but important to realise this is very much a “live” site so these things happen.
Written 2 July 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Bodillymill
Helston, UK186 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2016
One of the baths you can enter, not too well restored so you see it at is in the main.. The site does have a new roof protecting some frescos on the far side..
Written 14 July 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ashfield531
Ringwood, UK1,221 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2017 • Couples
You get to enter this set of buildings and can appreciate the layout but at least two of the public baths in Pompeii are far more interesting and informative; however while at Herculaneum you should certainly visit.
Written 12 June 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Philip L
Boston, MA47 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2017 • Couples
Part of the trip worth seeing. Think it would s one of the biggest. Well preserved. We had to walk around a bit to find the right entrance and the women's bath is actually very good too.
Written 16 April 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

retireeVancouver
Vancouver, Canada1,828 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2016 • Couples
The Central Baths building was on Cardo IV close to the College of Augustales and the House of Nero in a section called Insula VI. Both men's and women's baths were located here, but they were separated. I preferred the visit to the women's baths as they were well preserved.

In the women's bath section were 3 smallish rooms with 2 intact floor mosaics, marble benches, shelves for clothes/lotions/soap, and a long low marble tub. Both of the floor mosaics were black and white, but the design on each was different. One floor where the women changed had a sea creature theme with a naked Trition swimming among an octopus, dolphins, and water eel. On the wall, partitioned stone shelves had enough space for the bather's clothes and shoes. Underneath the shelves was a stone bench for sitting on while the bather removed her clothes. The adjacent room had a floor with a geometric design and, again, shelves for lotions or soap as this room was for a quick wash. The last room had the bathing tub, portions of it still clad in marble. This room had a lovely terra cotta colored marble bench with interesting "feet" - lion leg? Blotchy pieces of terra cotta wall color could also be seen. The ceiling was barrel shaped so that water condensing on it would drip down the sides and not onto the people below.

I liked these 3 rooms in the women's bath section of the Central Baths for the details I saw in them rather than the workings of a bath which would show the heating system - the boilers and pipes, This bath complex was located in the middle of the town, but there was another bath complex near the boat houses where the skeletons were found.
Written 19 October 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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