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Abbe Museum

26 Mount Desert St, Bar Harbor, Mount Desert Island, ME 04609-1782
+1 207-288-3519
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Review Highlights
Interesting museum!

This small museum is worth a visit. It tells the story of the local Native Americans - the... read more

Reviewed 5 days ago
Beach1613
,
Wildwood Crest, New Jersey
On a Rainy Day

Abbe Museum is a small American Indian Museum well worth visiting. Unlike other institutions, it... read more

Reviewed 1 week ago
Hans M
,
Zurich, Switzerland
Read all 283 reviews
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Overview
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The Abbe Museum shares the history and culture of Maine’s Native people, collectively known as the Wabanaki (Penobscot, Passamaquoddy, Micmac, and Maliseet), and operates from two locations in Bar Harbor. At our downtown location, visitors find dynamic exhibitions and activities interspersed with spaces for quiet reflection. At the Abbe’s historic trailside museum at Sieur de Monts Spring, guests can experience early 20th century archaeological discoveries informed by 21st century science. The downtown Abbe Museum serves guests year-round, while the Sieur de Monts Spring location is open seasonally from mid-May to mid-October. Admission includes both locations. Located in an historic downtown district, we offer clean restrooms, several nearby restaurants and Bar Harbor attractions, and nearby motorcoach parking. Other amenities may be offered with notice. The History of the Abbe Museum: First opened to the public in 1928, the Abbe Museum is named for its founder, Dr. Robert Abbe, an eminent New York physician and beloved summer resident of Bar Harbor. During the 1920s, Dr. Abbe assembled a collection of early Native American artifacts found in the Frenchman Bay area which launched the museum at Sieur de Monts Spring. In 2001, we opened our second facility in a renovated historic landmark in downtown Bar Harbor. Today, the Abbe offers changing exhibitions and a robust programming schedule for all ages. Our museum shop is a destination for unique gifts and art and shipping is offered.
  • Excellent47%
  • Very good33%
  • Average15%
  • Poor3%
  • Terrible2%
Travellers talk about
“birch bark” (11 reviews)
“gift shop” (21 reviews)
LOCATION
26 Mount Desert St, Bar Harbor, Mount Desert Island, ME 04609-1782
CONTACT
Website
+1 207-288-3519
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Reviews (283)
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1 - 10 of 279 reviews

Reviewed 5 days ago

This small museum is worth a visit. It tells the story of the local Native Americans - the Wabanaki Nations. My husband and I spent about an hour and a half to learn some local flavor. Well done and worth the trip.

Thank Beach1613
Reviewed 1 week ago

Abbe Museum is a small American Indian Museum well worth visiting. Unlike other institutions, it successfully connects old Indian heritage with 21st century life. Besides the permanent collection, we admired a drawing and painting exhibition of highly talented Indian children (kindergarten to 9th grade). Guided...More

Thank Hans M
Reviewed 2 weeks ago

The Abbe is small but the information is interesting. My favourite part was the listening stand where you could hear three different languages being spoken. It does feel slightly sparse but maybe it will fill out as time goes on and they get more funding...More

Thank TooManyExclamations
Reviewed 3 weeks ago

This is a small museum about the native people of the area - the Wabanaki Nations. As my graduate degree is in Cultural Anthropology, I am always interested in learning about the cultural past of an area, and this museum does a nice job teaching...More

Thank anthro92
Reviewed 3 weeks ago via mobile

Maybe I had too great expectations for this museum as I am interested in indigenous people and their history. The building was huge but there were not enough exhibitions. One big room was students drawings, which I thought could have been elsewhere as that's the...More

Thank kirke k
Reviewed 3 weeks ago

This is the first time we have visited the Abbe Museum. It gives an interesting history of the Native American tribes that live mostly in Maine. The artifacts are from as many as 4,000 years ago. We thoroughly enjoyed this museum and learned a lot...More

Thank mlavendier
Reviewed 4 weeks ago via mobile

The Abbe Museum is part of the Smithsonian & shows the WONDERFUL history of Native Americans.... particularly the tribes for the North East. Must see!!!

Thank Bev B
Reviewed 11 October 2017

found this because we stayed next door, Acadia Hotel. a must see to become familiar with the indigenous people of the area. facinating art work, lovely meditation building.

2  Thank debra s
Reviewed 9 October 2017

Nice little museum. Interesting displays and a lot of interactive areas for information. Nice children's area with hands on activities.

Thank DimarieOhio
Reviewed 6 October 2017 via mobile

$8 adult entry (plus tax) This museum is dedicated to the native community. Nice shop attached selling some lovely items- unfortunately too big and bulky to bring home on a plane, and also very expensive ($2500+ for a woven basket) but we did buy some...More

Thank ELAINE B
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