Pigeon Roost State Historic Site

Pigeon Roost State Historic Site

Historic Sites • Cemeteries • Monuments & Statues
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Detailed Reviews: Reviews order informed by descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as cleanliness, atmosphere, general tips and location information.

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6 reviews
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waldentenn
Signal Mountain, TN794 contributions
Oct 2020
Run by the state, this is a tiny park located just east of US 31. It commemorates the massacre by Indians of Hoosiers during the early 19th century. The site consists of an impressive monument, a couple of interpretive signs, a repro cabin, and some picnic tables. Not much advantage to visiting here as opposed to just reading a sign but the event itself is of some interest.
Written 19 October 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

dawn71649
Wyoming, MI26 contributions
May 2019 • Solo
I was passing by when I saw the sign . Interesting to see what happen there between the settlers and the Indians
Written 31 May 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Ronnie H
Scottsburg, IN43 contributions
May 2018 • Couples
This is a nice Historic site . Since the state finally cleaned it up it is a great place to picnic , and enjoy the outdoors .
Written 7 January 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

interceptpubs
Columbus, IN1,019 contributions
Oct 2018 • Solo
Pigeon Roost, named for the large number of passenger pigeons found here at the time, was a small collection of log cabins built in 1809 by settlers coming up from Kentucky. The problem was that the Native Americans in the area, particularly the Shawnee, believed the land on which they were built was theirs.

Growing alarmed by the influx of settlers throughout the region in general and supported by the British who were interested in limiting American expansion as a threat to their own North American ambitions, the Native Americans were increasingly restless and convinced that peaceful coexistence was growing impossible. The Battle of Tippecanoe fought further north near present day Lafayette in November 1811 was the first organized manifestation of this unrest.

Based on the British role in the Native American unrest in the Northwest Territory (modern day Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin) and British actions against American maritime trade on the high seas, including the impressment of American sailors into the British Royal Navy, the United States declared war on the British in June 1812. While some Native Americans allied themselves with the Americans, others, particularly the Shawnee and other tribes in the Northwest Territory, openly joined with the British.

In September 1812, the Native Americans simultaneously attacked Pigeon Roost, Terre Haute, and Fort Wayne. Here, two dozen settlers were killed - fifteen were children. The settlers were able to kill only four of the attackers. Militia troops arrived after the massacre and gave chase, finally catching up with the war party in present day Bartholomew County. In the ensuring action, one of the militia troops was wounded (and later died) before the Native Americans were able to escape.

Although the War of 1812 continued until early 1815, the climax in the Northwest Territory would occur in October 1813 when American Forces under Gen. WIlliam Henry Harrison (also Indiana's Territorial Governor) caught up with British and Native American forces retreating from Detroit at the Battle of Thames. Tecumseh, the charismatic Shawnee leader, was killed during the battle which effectively ended the organized Native American resistance effort against American settlement in the region.

While in the immediate aftermath of the attack Pigeon Roost was rebuilt, eventually the hamlet died out. The state erected a monument marking the site of the massacre in 1904 - a 44-foot-tall obelisk made of Indiana limestone that still stands here today. More recently a stone bench with the names of the victims has been added, as well as a replica of a period log cabin and picnic shelter.
Written 21 October 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Ginnyc661
South Carolina160 contributions
Jun 2016 • Family
We were here with my father-in-law because he grew up here in Scottsburg. We visited here for something to do. It was enjoyable.
Written 23 June 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Cynthia K
Westville, IN3,000 contributions
May 2016 • Couples
This is a State Historic Site that's about 5 miles South of Scottsburg on HWY 31. There is signage that directs you to the site. After turning onto the one lane road, you cross a railroad crossing. There's no crossing gate, so be sure to look both ways. There's no bathroom facilities.

This is a sad monument to an indian massacre that occurred in the small settlement of Pigeon Roost, Indiana on Sept 3, 1812. The British were apparently encouraging the area Native Americans to attack settlements. Pigeon Roost was settled in 1809.
There were 20 settlers killed, most of them women & children. All in all a sad period in Indiana's history. One I never knew about.

There's an obelisk monument that was built in the early 20th century & dedicated to the settlers killed. There's also a bench monument that has the names of the settlers killed & a poem dedicated to the event. A rebuilt cabin of the type probably used at the time is also on site. There's a fairly large cemetery that has some old graves & some recent ones.
An old trailer sits on the other side of the lane across from the cemetery.

This is apparently a popular ghost hunting place. Check out the sites on line for more info. We didn't notice any ghost activity, but we were there at noon. All in all an ok place to kill 20 minutes.
Written 16 May 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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Pigeon Roost State Historic Site, Scottsburg

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