Johnson Victrola Museum

Johnson Victrola Museum, Dover: Hours, Address, Johnson Victrola Museum Reviews: 5/5

Johnson Victrola Museum
5
9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Wednesday
9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Thursday
9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Friday
9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
Saturday
9:00 AM - 4:30 PM
About
Named in honor of local inventor E.R. Johnson, this museum explores the sound recording industry from its beginnings and includes displays of early talking machines, records and other relics from the 1890s to 1929.
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5.0
131 reviews
Excellent
107
Very good
22
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0
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2

crimescenedoc
Stony Brook, NY24 contributions
Jul 2021
Based on other reviews, we decided to check out the museum with no expectations. and it turned out to be one of the best museums we've visited. Fans of history, electronics, music, records/record players will all find something to interest them.

It is self guided on the first floor, but the tour guide is there to provide fun facts as you move through the history of the machines (actual ones on display) and playing records on theses machines allowing guests to hear how the sound progressed with new technologies

The second floor is guided. We were hesitant since we were the only ones there (which can be uncomfortable),but the guide was charming and funny and we enjoyed every minute of it! We left smiling ear to ear!
Written 1 August 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Dave C
Alexandria, VA1,383 contributions
Apr 2021
This is really a hidden gem. If you don't know about the history, culture, and importance of the Victrola, this is the place to learn. Victrola were such a important part of culture at the turn of the last century, and the museum is a great primer for those new to the subject and a treat for even experienced history buffs. Wonderful staff. My wife, who isn't much of a buff, loved it as well.
Written 11 April 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Me H
New Milford, CT253 contributions
Oct 2020
In this Time of Covid, you can only view the downstairs. You are limited to about 30 minutes for viewing and listening to the person talk about the place. The self guided tour ends with a sample listening of a Victrola playing a record. Overall it was interesting. You need to call for a reservation ahead of time. Donations are accepted.
Written 12 October 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Judy S
Pulaski, TN458 contributions
Sep 2020
We thoroughly enjoyed our visit, although it was short. Unfortunately, with the COVID, we were only allowed 30 minutes to take a self-guided tour. The employees were very friendly and answered all of our questions.
Written 1 October 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Jerome M
Gary, IN1,444 contributions
Jun 2019
This is a great place to see the old style stereos. I remember when we had an old record player and the RCA Victor was a popular label. The history of the phonograph is laid out for you. I like when our guide played some of the old music and comparing it to today's sounds. It is very educational for people who like music. It is a hidden gem.
Written 23 May 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Thelma G
Felton, DE22 contributions
Feb 2020
Having purchased a Victor Talking Machine at an auction, I wanted to visit the mueseum to learn about the company and the machines. Entered a 1920s-era store inside the museum and was greeted by a very knowledgeable lady who explained how the company got started. She demonstrated numerous talking devices using 78-rpm records; fun to listen to the old records. Also learned prices of the machines back in the day. Many of the recording artists were black, to include Fats Waller, Jelly Roll Morton, Duk Ellington, Enrico Caruso, John McCormack, Nellie Melba, Rosa Panselle and Marian Anderson. Also learned the color of the label determine the type of music that was recorded. For example, Red was Classical, Black was Popular, Green was Educational, etc. In Europe the color of the label determined the price of the record. Heard the story of Nipper, the dog who heard his master's voice, becoming one of the most famous canines in history. The museum highlights the life and achievements of Delaware's native son, Eldridge R. Johnson, founder of the Victor Talking Machine Company. The tour lasted about an hour but you were welcome to stay longer to read the information presented.
Written 29 February 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Nancy G
Towson, MD101 contributions
Feb 2020
The museum is well thought out and and an interesting place to spend an hour, especially if you remember Victrolas. Basically it is the early history of recorded sound. There was a WWI poster which said there are victor records that can teach you to speak French correctly, in case of emergency! Very interesting all around.
Written 7 February 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Donna B
Dover, DE78 contributions
Aug 2019 • Family
This museum is a local treasure. It is dedicated to tell the story of the invention and evolution of the phonograph, that is the record player and records. Visitors are provided a guided tour featuring the life of the inventor and several versions of the record player as it evolved over the years. Visitors will hear some of the first recordings made so long ago.
Written 18 August 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Jonathan K
Cincinnati, OH120 contributions
Aug 2019
I suppose some appreciation for antique "talking machines" would be a prerequisite for enjoying this one-of-a-kind museum, but we spent two delightful hours there, and the docents were the best part of the visit. Who knew, for example, that "Melba Toast" was named after the Victor recording artist Nellie Melba? This museum elucidates the mechanics, the craftsmanship, the musicianship, and the historic significance of the Victor Talking Machine company and its recording label.
Written 14 August 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

duffey3700
Richmond, VA2,480 contributions
Jul 2019 • Couples
Very educational museum if you are interested in the history of phonographs. Lots of memorabilia to read and look at. There were two individuals on site to answer questions and we were impressed with their knowledge of the items in the museum. No charge to get in but there is a donation box available.
Written 5 August 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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Frequently Asked Questions about Johnson Victrola Museum

Johnson Victrola Museum is open:
  • Wed - Sat 9:00 AM - 4:30 PM