Komodo Island

Komodo Island, Komodo National Park: Hours, Address, Komodo Island Reviews: 4.5/5

Komodo Island
4.5
National Parks • Nature & Wildlife Areas
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Monday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Tuesday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Wednesday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Thursday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Friday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Saturday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Sunday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
About
Suggested duration
< 1 hour
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4.5
925 reviews
Excellent
532
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227
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101
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37
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Andika D
Jakarta, Indonesia156 contributions
Jun 2021
Komodo island is about 60 minutes from labuan Bajo by speedboat that you can rent it 2000-2500K in a day. when you arrive on that island, in the first gate there are saveral sign such as welome and watch out komodo crossing. suddenly you will realize that place is not like a zoo. all animals live freedom (Komodo, Pig, deer, buffalo, etc)

Enjoy the journey by tracking island with ranger who direct and guard your activity. dont forget to capture your moment esspecially with Komodo, ranger always offer you to do it. this place is quiet incredible, not only the Komodo but the atmostphere also.
Written 24 August 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Rinaap
Jakarta, Indonesia197 contributions
Nov 2020 • Friends
Actually we pay about 80 k, and spent only 30 mnt here, because the guard say theres not much komodo, and we find some of them beside restourant, with many people around it, so its hardly difficult to take a picture, but we cannot go to a labuan bajo without see a komodo right
Written 11 December 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Muriya DMC
Surabaya, Indonesia13 contributions
Oct 2020
See Komodo dragons in the wild and see how they have survived to this day. An experience that will never be forgotten
Written 3 December 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

simply-peregrinating
Waddington, UK2,754 contributions
Jan 2020
Komodo Island is one of several that make up The Komodo National Park. The island is extremely scenic and idyllic, and the surrounding views of Komodo and the other islands are breathtaking. Of course the main reason people come here is to see the dragons but other than the dragons we saw deer, spinner dolphins and several different birds including sea eagles, on our visit.
Written 24 October 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Brad X
Minnesota567 contributions
Mar 2020
We were going to be in Indonesia so we decided we wanted to see the dragons as this might be the only time we would ever get the chance. We were hesitant to book any flights to Labuan Bajo or a place to stay because of all the uncertainty surrounding the visitor fees for Komodo National Park. We visited in the middle of March 2020 and the fees were still roughly 400,000 IDR per person. About a week prior to our trip to Bali we decided to go ahead and book the side trip to Flores. We're glad we did. Upon arrival at the island, you get to pick one of three trails to walk. Having read other reviews where people basically said you won't see the dragons on the trails, only laying next to the restaurant, I didn't want to take the very long trail, so we opted for the medium distance trek. The park ranger that was assigned to us did a good job giving a history of the park and the island. He explained a lot about the dragons and the other animals on the island. We got to see lots of wild pigs, deer, and Guinea hens. About halfway through the walk, the ranger pointed down the trail and we saw a dragon walking towards us. He quickly told me to open the camera app on my phone and give it to him. He grabbed some sticks from alongside the trail and propped my camera up taking a video. He had us back up down the trail and did the same thing with a couple other cameras we had. The dragon walked up to the cameras and inspected them, as well as licked them. Dragon spit..... Anyway, we got some great videos and pictures of the dragon before it decided to turn and walk off into the woods. The guide kept repeating that we were really lucky to see a dragon, which kind of reinforces my belief that the majority of people won't see them while walking around. They will only see the ones laying in the shade next to the restaurant where they have basically been baited to be there. I kind of understand why the locals bait them and train them to hang around the restaurant. It's so difficult to see them in the wild (especially with a group of other noisy, chattering tourists spooking them away), they want people to not feel cheated and walk away without ever laying eyes on a live dragon. Business would probably dry up if the majority of people traveled all the way there and never laid eyes on a live dragon. Hopefully the Indonesian government chooses to keep the entrance fee for the park at a reasonable rate. We had a great time, but I would find it hard to try to tell people it would be worth going if the fee is raised to $1000 per person. The dragons are cool, but not $1000 per person cool.
Written 29 March 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

freddyg13
Shanghai, China67 contributions
Dec 2019
It was an amazing experience, and happy the dragons were out and about. It was unexpected and the park rangers also said they weren't sure if they would be out at the time of day we arrived, but they were out and about and around us. It was great to see them in the natural habitat and happy that they're being taken care of. It was a great experience and happy I made it!
Written 25 March 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Alex Koi
Singapore, Singapore364 contributions
May 2019 • Friends
Komodo is well known for its meat eating three meters long reptile: the Komodo dragon.
Actually there are pink sandy beaches with no one around.
Best traveled on mobile bum boat.
All meals included. Can ask for night fishing. Just remember to tip the boatman.
Written 17 March 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Nigel F
London, UK61 contributions
Mar 2020 • Couples
We were taken here from our boat by our guide and were well received, given an English speaking guide who was knowledgable and pleasant.
The site is well maintained with a number of options for difficulty of terrain and time.
Of course the star attractions were amazing - inevitably, being bright creatures many were hanging out near the guides kitchen, but do press on into the island itself to see them in their natural habitat.
Written 14 March 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Kenai Drift Anglers
Soldotna, AK54 contributions
Oct 2019
It's a must do to see the dragons, but it was a little pricey when we got on the island for the park fee. The dragons were very cool and guide was really fun. It just was a pretty short tour and not a lot of activity however the guide made it very enjoyable. Just make sure you bring enough cash for the entrance fee and all the other fees attached to that.
Written 25 February 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Max W
Vancouver, Canada145 contributions
Dec 2019
The wet season is supposed to have begun, but the rains haven’t arrived yet, and everything is dun and dusty. The temperature is in the 90s; the humidity smothers you like a hot, wet towel. No one is allowed on this island—a UNESCO protected site—without a guide, and strict rules are enforced to protect the animals we're here to see, the Komodo dragons—huge monitor lizards that have survived from the time of the dinosaurs: stay quiet, stay on the paths, don’t approach them, don’t wear red or have open wounds (they can smell blood from five kilometres away, and women who are menstruating are encouraged not to visit).
We are split into small groups of 15 or so and warned that we may not see any of the animals at all: the island is large, and they roam freely in search of food (which is more or less anything that they can catch: wild pigs, deer, chickens, the occasional foolhardy human—a German tourist three years ago was apparently the most recent). If we see three during our trip, says our guide, we will be fortunate people. We may see none. Our little party is topped and tailed by a pair of local guards, each equipped with a long stick with a fork at the end—to flip a dragon away if it comes too close. They can run fast, we are told, but they can only run straight ahead—so if you’re running to get away from them, run a zig-zag route.
We trek through the dry jungle, fallen palms beside our path, feral deer and pigs in the scrub, huge black beehives wrapped around high branches above us, all of us alert to the possibility of—at any moment—the appearance of the dragons. We are all at varying stages of heat exhaustion.
The reward is, of course, an encounter with the dragons—five of them, under a spreading tree beside an almost dried-out watering-hole, lying in wait for the animals that will inevitably have to come down to drink. This is probably the only time in our lives that we’ll be here, and we hover for a long time, watching them watching us, every creature—them and us—more or less immobile.
Some of them seem asleep, which wouldn’t be unusual, since they only need to eat once a week. They are huge beasts with blunt heads, flopped out in the dust and across the rocks the way any lizard would be, only steroidally bigger: ten feet long or more. They are leftover dinosaurs, and not a highly developed species as species go, which makes their survival all the more remarkable. They lay their eggs in huge mounds that they commandeer from the guinea fowl who go to all the trouble of building them, and they’ll eat anything, including their young (only two per cent of hatched eggs make it to maturity) and each other. Males who survive live to 50 years, females to 35.
We hear them hissing danger warnings to each other, and the guards with the forked sticks stay wary, but it doesn’t seem likely that we’re going to be eaten or attacked today. It is a remarkable experience, unrepeatable, to be in the natural presence of such an ancient evolutionary throwback. We are reluctant to move on, but eventually we do, perhaps heeding the warning: let sleeping dragons lie.
Written 8 February 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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