Manuha Temple
Manuha Temple
4

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as waiting time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles259 reviews
Excellent
92
Very good
112
Average
48
Poor
5
Terrible
2

Cherry
Mandalay, Myanmar29 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2020
Manuha Temple was built by King Manuha, mon of Thahton. It was built in the 11th century under King Anawrahta. Mon King Manuha had to live under house-arrest in Bagan. Bagan King did not kill Mon King but watched strictly. To build this temple, the prisoner King sold some his gemstones.Now this temple remains as the symbol of Mon-Myanmar relations in Bagan era.
Written 19 March 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Suwandi8
Jakarta, Indonesia405 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2019
There is a gigantic Buddha statue in the temple. In this place have big bowl where you can donated rice or money
Written 18 September 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

SOH KIEN PENG
Singapore, Singapore9,253 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2017 • Solo
If you are staying near New Bagan, this temple would be nearer to your exploration as it is located at Myinkaba village at the southern end of Old Bagan.

I was not staying at New Bagan. I was staying at Eden Hotel in Nyaung U town at the northern tip of Old Bagan.

The first day I rented a bicycle, cycled along Old Bagan-Nyaung U Road all the way to Bagan Archaelogical Museum. Along the way, I visited most of the prominent temples accessible along both sides of this main road.

I started cycling at about 8 am and returned to Nyaung U at about 4 pm. The hostel was kind enough to allow me to return the bicycle before midnight but I was really physically exhausted.

When the morning weather was cool and windy, I really had fun with the riding exploration. But when the weather was scorching hot in the afternoon and I was sweating profusely, every inch to go forward on the pedal was straining on my thigh muscles and was a
a physical tough challenge. I must admit I am not someone who cycled regularly in my country.

The next day at about 8 am, I decided to walk my way along Anawrahta Road towards the south of Bagan. Anawratha Road was a much more pleasant road than Bagan-Nyaung Road as traffic is less and the two pavements at the side of the road facilitated easier walking.

In fact, I found walking easier than cycling. I reached Ananda Temple by 10 am and decided to walk to Myinkaba Village and New Bagan. By the time, I reached Myinkaba Village, it was past noon and again tiredness set in. I was physically exhausted to cycle further down to New Bagan. It may take another 1 to 2 hrs but my stress alarm had sounded. I visited a Long Neck weaving factory and then I bumped into this Manuka Temple and was the last temple I visited.

The exterior whitewashed facade of the temple looks enormous but rectangularly plain with two storeys. The gilded stupa studded round the main building of the pagoda made it look different from the rest of the red brown Bagan pagodas with triumphant spires. I identified easily as Mon style of architecture.

True enough, this pagoda was built by a captivated Mon King who sought the permission from King Anawrahta, the Bagan King who captured him. The reclining and Seating Buddha sculptures in the interior seem quite cramped reflecting his displeasure of his captivated life he was in.

It was fortunate that King Anawrahta did not kill him and even allow him to build this temple. King Anawrahta converted his religion to Buddhism and was the pioneer to embark on a wide scale merit construction of Buddhist pagodas and temple succeeded by the line of kings after him and throughout the rule of the Bagan Dynasty.

The superior masonry and building skills of the Mons made his dream possible and probably King Anawrahta was tapping on the charisma of the Mon King to mobilize his skilled subjects to launch for him his dream of the massive construction of pagodas.

The Temple deserved a visit because it was reputedly the oldest temple in Bagan built in 1067 AD and by a captivated Mon King.
Written 28 April 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Kyaw M
Yangon (Rangoon), Myanmar963 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2015 • Couples
This Pagoda was built by King MaNuHar of Mon when he was a prisoner of Myanmar King Anawyahta.When he lost the war his family and his staffs were kept as prisoners but could lived freely in their own village.This pagoda showed how his life was tight.Huge Buddha Statue in tight space.In the south of this Pagoda there was a temple inside have rock carving like Angkor Wat(Hindu Style).
Written 8 September 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Smeets P
London, UK9,370 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2014 • Solo
King Manuha was held captive in Bagan and the legend says that Manuha was allowed to build this temple in 1059 and that he constructed it to represent his displeasure at captivity. Inside the three seated Buddhas face the front of the building and in the back there's a huge reclining Buddha. All seem too large for their enclosures and their cramped, uncomfortable positions are said to represent the stress and lack of comfort the 'captive king' had to endure. It is said that only the reclining Buddha, in the act of entering nirvana, has a smile on its face, showing that for Manuha only death was a release from his suffering found this pagoda very interesting.
Written 6 May 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Hepatacyte
Northallerton, UK773 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2019 • Couples
Belated review of Manuha Phaya with its enormous Buddha. Not in the main town Old Bagan but a short bike ride away in Myinkaba. The enormous reclining Buddha is at the rear of the temple. There are 3 large Buddhas in the temple bit not quite the same scale as the enormous one. In the courtyard there are a number of interesting statues.
There is also a platform type construction that people give offerings of rice I(I thinbk)
Worth a visit.
Written 8 May 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

TravelerTrecker
Houston831 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2018 • Family
The temple of Manuha was built by the King Mon Manuha in 1059 while imprisoned in Mynkaba by the King Anawhrata of Bagan. King Manuha sold the crown jewels to build this temple. The temple is impressive. It has 4 large, very well preserved Buddhas, including a reclining one, in very confined spaces. The symbolism is clear, King Manuha wanted to describe how he felt while imprisoned.

The temple of Manuha is one of the 5 temples of Mynkaba (Manuha, Abeyadana, Nanpaya, Nagayon, Guyaukgyi). All of them are historically speaking connected and to understand the history is important to visit them together. They are at walking distance to each other. They are quite different. You can spent 2-3 hours while visiting them together. There are shops where you can buy water and souvenirs. Mynkaba is quite relaxing!
Written 2 January 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Kai Wah
Malaysia3,580 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2018 • Couples
Located in between the new and old Bagan, this temple has rustic look which is different from other Temples in Bagan. There is a gigantic golden Buddha statue in the temple. Do note that all Temples in Myanmar require appropriate dress code with shirt covering shoulder and long pants/ dress covering till feet. Slippers are better options of footwear since no shoes and socks allowed within the temple compound. Archeological sites in Bagan requires entrance fee of 25,000 per person per entry valid for 4 days.
Written 27 December 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

AlTraveler
Satellite Beach, FL305 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2018 • Couples
The Manuha Temple, built about 1059 by the King of the Khmar or eponymous king when he was in exile. He wanted a temple in which his people could pray. In an outer building there are statues representing the King and Queen of Khmar. This temple holds an extraordinary quartet of oversized Buddhas – three giant gilded sitting figures and a huge reclining one.
Written 4 December 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

kowie55
Chennai (Madras), India745 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2018 • Couples
King Manuha was defeated and imprisoned inside the Nanpaya Temple by King Anawrahta. (Recommend combining this visit with the nearby Nanpaya Temple -- helps you to see the history connection). He was permitted to commission his own temple and he built the Manuha temple. The 3 large Buddhas inside the temple seem to be "squeezed" into 3 small sanctums. This is said to reflect king Manuha's anguish at being restricted inside the prison. This is an important temple for the Mon ethnic of Myanmar. The architecture is Mon-style
Written 24 November 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Showing results 1-10 of 100
Is this your Tripadvisor listing?
Own or manage this property? Claim your listing for free to respond to reviews, update your profile and much more.
Claim your listing

Manuha Temple, Bagan - Tripadvisor

All Bagan HotelsBagan Hotel DealsLast Minute Hotels in Bagan
All things to do in Bagan
Day Trips in Bagan
RestaurantsFlightsHoliday homesTravel StoriesCruisesCar Hire