Maghak-i 'Attari Mosque
Maghak-i 'Attari Mosque
4
Ancient RuinsArchitectural BuildingsReligious Sites
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Popular mentions

4.0
110 reviews
Excellent
25
Very good
59
Average
24
Poor
1
Terrible
1

starlightShanghai
Victoria, Canada3,673 contributions
Sept 2023 • Family
This beautiful building is the former Maghak-i 'Attari Mosque, now a carpet museum. Didn’t bother going in. Just relaxed on a bench in the shade and tried counting the huge number of tourists all trying to squeeze into the place. Beautiful building and gorgeous surrounding area.
Written 27 September 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

KatielouAustralia
Hobart, Australia1,734 contributions
Jun 2023 • Friends
The Magoki-Attori Mosque is an excellent example of Central Asian architecture and its facade was unearthed only as a result of excavations carried out in the 1930s.
Written 8 July 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Bozeman-Dublin
Trim, Ireland8,868 contributions
Apr 2023 • Friends
Now this is a real gem, Bukharas oldest Mosque and its a beauty. The original Mosque dates from the 9th century and is half buried to hide it from Chinngis Khan and his marauders.
Even that was not the first Temple on the site as before then it was home to the Zoroastrian Fire worshippers.
The Mosque visible today is a younger one but still dates from the 12th to 16rh century.
There are foundations opposite of an ancient Caravansarai.
On our visit it was not open as restoration works continue. No matter, it is beautiful enough from the outside and has such an I terstinf story that it is well worth a stop
Written 2 May 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

saronic
Zurich, Switzerland26,268 contributions
Sept 2022
About 100m to the west of the Lyab-i Hauz pool is the art-historically important Maghak-i Attari mosque, now about 4.5m below the actual ground, which shows how old it is. Archaeologists have established after excavations that a first mosque had been constructed here in the 9th century on top of a temple of Zoroastrian fire worshippers. What we see today is mostly from the 12th and the 16th century.

In the east and on the actual ground level is a gate from the 16th century. Going down some steps one comes to the 12th century southern gate with its rich decoration, mainly of bricks, but also some blue glazing, but all not in the best condition. Here one can see how most gates must have looked like in Bukhara and the rest of Uzbekistan before extensive renovations with new tiles in Soviet times.

The mosque was closed, when I passed by, since probably some restoration work is planned. On a plaque outside it says that in here a Museum of the History of Carpet Weaving was opened in 1991.
Written 16 January 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Beatriz M
Düsseldorf, Germany5,710 contributions
Dec 2022
The oldest mosque of Bukhara. Very interesting that it was excavated from under the earth. You can see that it is on a lower level than the rest of the city. Very beautiful details on the facade. I had read that inside there is a carpet museum or workshop but when I was there, there were renovations being done inside the mosque so it was not open.
Written 4 January 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Dirk W
Alexandra Headland, Australia6,463 contributions
Oct 2022
This may be the oldest surviving mosque in Central Asia and therefore significant. Apparently archeologists have found Buddhist and Zoroastrian traces on this site ; as we see so often, old temples are destroyed or adapted to fit the new religion of the conquerors - Islamic Arabs in this case. It sits about 4m under the current street level of the city. The fact that it was covered by silt for centuries saved it from Genghis and subsequent invaders. The brickwork around the entrance is beautiful and you see traces of blue decorations. Unfortunately, it was closed during my visit (Oct '22).
Written 13 November 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Madan Gopal M
Bengaluru, India4,629 contributions
Oct 2022 • Solo
Located by the side of Lyabi-Hauz, this is the oldest surviving mosque in Central Asia. The archeological work and restoration is in progress. A section of excavations are can be seen. This place was earlier 5th century Zoroastrian temple and a Buddhist temple as per archeological evidence.
Written 3 November 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Brun066
Florence, Italy12,484 contributions
Jun 2022
Abu Bakr Narshaki (ca. 900-960AD), author in the Samanid period of the volume "History of Bukhara" (Tarikh-i Bukhara is the original title in Arabic), writes that the Magok-i-Attari mosque derives its name from Persian word 'maghākī', which means "in a ditch" or "in a pit".
This implies that already at the time of its foundation the ground floor of this venerable mosque is strongly underneath the street level. This - together with the story of the mausoleum of Ismail Saman, half buried until the last century - authorizes us to infer that the soil in Bukhara is subject to strong silting phenomena.
These observations allow us to give greater faith to what is the popular tradition: that is, that the mosque was saved from the destruction of the city by the Mongols of Genghis Khan, as the population would have buried it. In essence, the inhabitants would have simply accentuated the "pit" effect.
In this way, the mosque is the oldest in Central Asia; its oldest part dates from the 9th century. The rest was then rebuilt in the twelfth century (so it is still prior to the Mongol era) and a part also in the fifteenth century. In particular, the beautiful portal overlooking the square dates back to the 12th century.
The rest of the mosque's name, “Attari”, means “scent merchant” or “spice merchant”, indicating that the part of the bazaar intended for the sale of this commodity was in the vicinity of it.
Today the bazaar has - so to speak - "entered" the mosque itself. As often happens in Uzbekistan, the building is in fact used as a carpet display.
Written 13 October 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ViFi62
Bilthoven, The Netherlands169 contributions
Oct 2021
This very unassuming building is actually one of the oldest in all of Bukhara. When researching this building, archaeologists found the remains of Zoroastrian and Buddhist places of worship, underneath each other, showing that this now mosque has been a place of worship for a very long time, even before Islam times. The story goes, that the people of Bukhara, knowing that Dzjengis Khan was on his way to conquer the city, burried this holy building under layers of earth, and that's why it was spared from destruction. Fascinating.
Written 25 December 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ksarman
Yangon (Rangoon), Myanmar6,835 contributions
Dec 2021
the most beautiful side is the one that was hidding by the ground during centuries, here you ll discover the genuine brick design and the original turquoise color
inside it s the carpet museum, from outside take time to look after each sign, have a guide with you who ll explain all the meaning
Written 5 December 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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