Jamek Mosque
8:30 AM - 12:30 PM, 2:30 PM - 4:00 PM
Monday
8:30 AM - 12:30 PM
2:30 PM - 4:00 PM
Tuesday
8:30 AM - 12:30 PM
2:30 PM - 4:00 PM
Wednesday
8:30 AM - 12:30 PM
2:30 PM - 4:00 PM
Thursday
8:30 AM - 12:30 PM
2:30 PM - 4:00 PM
Friday
3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Saturday
8:30 AM - 12:30 PM
2:30 PM - 4:00 PM
Sunday
8:30 AM - 12:30 PM
2:30 PM - 4:00 PM
About
Masjid Jamek opened its doors more than 100 years ago, making it one of the oldest mosques in Kuala Lumpur. Built in a Moorish style with iconic white domes, the mosque sits at the confluence of the Sungei Klang and Sungei Gombak rivers. The bazaar outside is also well worth a visit.
Duration: < 1 hour
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  • Masjid Jamek • 2 min walk
  • Pasar Seni • 9 min walk
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See what travellers are saying
  • R Mughal
    Sydney, Australia79 contributions
    A RARE GEM FROM A BYGONE ERA
    If you are visiting Kuala Lumpur, then don’t miss the opportunity of touring one of its gems from a bygone era. You’ll be taken by its beauty. Masjid Jamek, officially known as Sultan Abdul Samad Jamek Mosque is the oldest standing mosque in Kuala Lumpur dating back to 1900s. Built at the confluence of the Klang and Gombak rivers, it’s only a couple of stops on LRT from the Sentral Station. The mosque was designed by Arthur Benison Hubback, a renowned British architect, and completed in 1909 during the Colonial time. The foundations stone was laid in 1908 by Alauddin Sulaiman Shah, the Sultan of Selangor at that time. The Indian Mosque, a few metres away, dating before Masjid Jamek, was originally built as a wooden structure in 1863. Masjid India was demolished in 1963 and replaced by the current three storey building Masjid Jamek’s architecture has Moorish and Mughal influences.The minbar, the wooden structure from where the imam delivers his sermon, dates back to the time of construction. So do the Mughal influenced doors, the dome, two main minarets, red brick and marble features. The mosque’s original open-air forecourt has since been covered. Across from the mosque is the Sultan Abdul Samad Building, also designed by Hubback in a similar style. It was completed in the late 1897 and currently houses government offices. It’s only a short walk from the mosque and worthy of visiting. Visitors to the mosque are welcome for guided tours. Just avoid the noon and evening prayer times. A small donation to the mosque is very welcome. You can grab a bottle of water here for next to nothing. There’s a wide choice of food around the mosque. The guides will gladly direct you to many food venues nearby. Opposite the LRT station you’ll find food carts serving local dishes and snacks. This is where most local workers converge. So you can be assured of a good deal. There are also many Indian and Malay restaurants, cafes/coffee houses around the Masjid.
    Visited March 2023
    Written 31 March 2023
  • Alex H
    Port St. Mary, United Kingdom1,313 contributions
    A great visit and information well told
    A well worthwhile trip to a place of worship where we were greeted by a friendly Muslim man, who told us a little bit about the mosque and their religion. It was interesting as we hadn’t really any idea about it so it was nice to hear information from someone so dedicated. The mosque itself is free entry for tourists, but of course remember to abide by the dress code (males and females) but they can give you robes if you forget. Also remember opening times due to the prayers. Overall would absolutely recommend coming here!
    Visited May 2023
    Travelled as a couple
    Written 20 May 2023
  • MD. EKRAMUL HAQUE
    Dhaka City, Bangladesh2 contributions
    Beautiful Mosque 🕌 of Truly Asia
    Very impressive and beautiful. A mosque 🕌 with The Masjid Jamek, also known as Jamek Mosque, is one of the oldest mosques in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It's located at the confluence of the Klang and Gombak rivers in the city center. The mosque is known for its beautiful Moorish architecture and historical significance. Visitors can explore its stunning design and serene surroundings.
    Visited July 2023
    Travelled as a couple
    Written 2 September 2023
  • Haytham Abu Firas
    Qatar14,379 contributions
    Masjid Jamek Sultan Abdul Samad
    Also called Sultan Abdul Samad Jamek Mosque. Located at the end of Merdeka Square after The River of Life. Such a nice place. You can perform pray or just visit. Many people to escort. Proper dress will be given near the entrance if needed.
    Visited September 2023
    Travelled with friends
    Written 27 September 2023
These reviews are the subjective opinion of Tripadvisor members and not of TripAdvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
Detailed Reviews: Reviews order informed by descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as cleanliness, atmosphere, general tips and location information.
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Haytham Abu Firas
Qatar14,379 contributions
Sep 2023 • Friends
Also called Sultan Abdul Samad Jamek Mosque. Located at the end of Merdeka Square after The River of Life. Such a nice place. You can perform pray or just visit. Many people to escort. Proper dress will be given near the entrance if needed.
Written 27 September 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

MD. EKRAMUL HAQUE
Dhaka City, Bangladesh2 contributions
Jul 2023 • Couples
Very impressive and beautiful. A mosque 🕌 with The Masjid Jamek, also known as Jamek Mosque, is one of the oldest mosques in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It's located at the confluence of the Klang and Gombak rivers in the city center. The mosque is known for its beautiful Moorish architecture and historical significance. Visitors can explore its stunning design and serene surroundings.
Written 2 September 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Alex H
Port St. Mary, UK1,313 contributions
May 2023 • Couples
A well worthwhile trip to a place of worship where we were greeted by a friendly Muslim man, who told us a little bit about the mosque and their religion. It was interesting as we hadn’t really any idea about it so it was nice to hear information from someone so dedicated. The mosque itself is free entry for tourists, but of course remember to abide by the dress code (males and females) but they can give you robes if you forget. Also remember opening times due to the prayers. Overall would absolutely recommend coming here!
Written 20 May 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

R Mughal
Sydney, Australia79 contributions
Mar 2023
If you are visiting Kuala Lumpur, then don’t miss the opportunity of touring one of its gems from a bygone era. You’ll be taken by its beauty.
Masjid Jamek, officially known as Sultan Abdul Samad Jamek Mosque is the oldest standing mosque in Kuala Lumpur dating back to 1900s. Built at the confluence of the Klang and Gombak rivers, it’s only a couple of stops on LRT from the Sentral Station.
The mosque was designed by Arthur Benison Hubback, a renowned British architect, and completed in 1909 during the Colonial time. The foundations stone was laid in 1908 by Alauddin Sulaiman Shah, the Sultan of Selangor at that time.
The Indian Mosque, a few metres away, dating before Masjid Jamek, was originally built as a wooden structure in 1863. Masjid India was demolished in 1963 and replaced by the current three storey building
Masjid Jamek’s architecture has Moorish and Mughal influences.The minbar, the wooden structure from where the imam delivers his sermon, dates back to the time of construction. So do the Mughal influenced doors, the dome, two main minarets, red brick and marble features. The mosque’s original open-air forecourt has since been covered.
Across from the mosque is the Sultan Abdul Samad Building, also designed by Hubback in a similar style. It was completed in the late 1897 and currently houses government offices. It’s only a short walk from the mosque and worthy of visiting.
Visitors to the mosque are welcome for guided tours. Just avoid the noon and evening prayer times. A small donation to the mosque is very welcome. You can grab a bottle of water here for next to nothing.
There’s a wide choice of food around the mosque. The guides will gladly direct you to many food venues nearby. Opposite the LRT station you’ll find food carts serving local dishes and snacks. This is where most local workers converge. So you can be assured of a good deal. There are also many Indian and Malay restaurants, cafes/coffee houses around the Masjid.
Written 31 March 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

MuZz
Mauritius247 contributions
Mar 2023
Went there for the Jummah. Nice place. Small but it's a very old and historical building.
Nice location, at the confluence of the 2 rivers.
Beautiful at night with the blue lights.
Written 11 March 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Nur&Ila
Singapore34 contributions
Sep 2022 • Family
Went there not only to perform my prayer, but also taking nice photo as well within the mosque vicinity. Mosque's staff is great, friendly and willing to went extra mile.
Written 12 September 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

B T
London, UK1,194 contributions
Aug 2022
The mosque itself looks pretty from the outside, but it is not worth going in. It is small, there is not much to see and they make you connect to the wifi and sign in online when you visit. Opening times online are not correct, as of Aug 2022 it is open 10-12:30 then 14:30-16 everyday apart from Friday.
Written 15 August 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Farah X
Sutton Bonington, UK36 contributions
Apr 2022
this mosque is not only breath taking but it is also a mughal mosque which takes me back to my roots therefore it is extra special. it looks as though it floats on water and the pictures come out perfect.
Written 18 June 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

baghdadlian
Montreal, Canada3,282 contributions
Feb 2020
We went to visit the Mosque and we had a beautiful experience. Women have to wear a cover up they lend you. We had a guide explain to us and we understood a lot about the religion. It was large and beautiful
Written 27 March 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Laura T
Middlesbrough, UK6,983 contributions
Feb 2020
A picturesque mosque - walk around the outside and take pictures from all angles. There is a path along the river around the mosque. The best photos can be taken from the promenade of the Klang River and from the River of Life platform. Spectacularly lit up at night.

To go inside the building everyone must be covered up, including arms and hair for women. We read that long skirts and headscarves are provided free of charge. However, we were both given purple robes to wear - my husband as he was wearing a vest and myself (dressed in knee length shorts and tshirt) because I had to cover my hair. While wearing the robes was novel and we got some fun photographs! it was absolutely boiling to be covered up like that with a heavy hood around my face on such a hot day!!

There is a very small garden at the back of the mosque near the river, just a shame the fountains weren't active - maybe a water shortage?

Free to visit although we left a small donation. We spent maybe 10-15 minutes looking around, as there wasn't as much to see as I had expected plus I was absolutely boiling inside the heavy robe! Open to tourists between 9am and 12.30pm, then 2.30-4pm, closed Fridays.
Written 12 March 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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