Dejima
8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Monday
8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Tuesday
8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Wednesday
8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Thursday
8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Friday
8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Saturday
8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Sunday
8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
About
An artificial island to which Dutch workers were restricted during Japan's era of isolation, the area is now being restored and includes historical buildings, a museum and a miniature model of the former island.
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  • David N
    Hawthorne, California5,045 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Where Japan Opened Up to Foreign Trade
    From 1636 to 1859, this small island is where trade between Europe and Japan was conducted. In order to stop the spread of Western culture, foreigners could only live on this island in all of Japan. Once trade opened up in the 19th Century, the surrounding land was reclaimed and the river was re-routed, but the island was restored in the latter half of the 20th Century. An extensive 3 phase restoration project completed from 2000-2016 has recreated 16 buildings from the early 19th Century. It is now a very popular tourist destination. There is a lot of historical information presented in audio and textual form in both English and Japanese. I was most impressed by the copper trade, as I was previously unaware that copper had been mined in Japan. As you visit each building, you get a taste of the type of commerce conducted there. I also found the miniature model of Dejima to be very interesting. Finally, there is an extensive exhibit on the influence of Western pottery in Japan. It can be oppressively hot in the summer, so be sure to bring water along and take some breaks in the air-conditioned buildings.
    Visited August 2023
    Travelled as a couple
    Written 5 October 2023
  • annette m
    Newcastle, Australia186 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Western influence began here
    Very interesting place to visit to learn about the history of Nagasaki and the western influence with a mix of Japanese and western style buildings. It is necessary to understand the background of Nagasaki and the Christian influence. The entry was only around $5 each, so not a huge impost. We enjoyed looking at the local school kids all dressed up. It takes about an hour to wander through at a leisurely pace. The gift shop is also filled with local items. Remember to climb up to the 2nd story of one of the buildings and take some photos of the street below. We got off the streetcar at the Dejima stop and then had to walk a fair way and try and work out how to get in as the nearest entry was closed. You have to walk over the river, walk a bit and then walk over another moat bridge to get in. There is a lovely little gift shop outside Irohaya Dejima which sells local goods and not as crowded.
    Visited November 2023
    Travelled with family
    Written 4 April 2024
  • MomRocco
    Chicago, Illinois538 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    The Dutch Traders - The Trade with Japan Must Have Been Really Lucrative
    Best thing about this historical site was the gift shop, especially the cards and magnets. Most of the buildings are closed and we had to rush through the ones that were open because our tour groups was off schedule due to traffic. It is impressive to imagine the Dutch traders being willingly restricted to this tiny space just so that they could trade with the Japanese.
    Visited May 2024
    Travelled as a couple
    Written 24 May 2024
These reviews are the subjective opinion of Tripadvisor members and not of TripAdvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as waiting time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Popular mentions

4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles1,182 reviews
Excellent
298
Very good
549
Average
285
Poor
44
Terrible
6

Dom
Germany23 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2020 • Solo
It's a very fascinating place. Considering that this small island was the only place in Japan that any foreigners could live, they made it work like a country, almost a selfcontained system. Huge recommendation especially for foreigners to see how our ancestors interacted with Japan! It's also a kind of weird and unique mix of Japanese and Western cultures.
Written 5 December 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

MomRocco
Chicago, IL538 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2024 • Couples
Best thing about this historical site was the gift shop, especially the cards and magnets. Most of the buildings are closed and we had to rush through the ones that were open because our tour groups was off schedule due to traffic. It is impressive to imagine the Dutch traders being willingly restricted to this tiny space just so that they could trade with the Japanese.
Written 24 May 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

brixtontrev
United Kingdom1,735 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2022
Having visited the Dutch Trading House in Hirado from where the Dutch were moved to Dejima in 1642 this was the next logical step to make whilst exploring the historical relationships between the Japanese and the Portuguese, the Spanish, and the Dutch who were put here from 1642 till 1854. If you have time to read it before a visit the most famous evocation of Dejima is the novel 'The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet' which really sets the scene. The site has been rebuilt after the original was absorbed by the surrounding developments. Each building has its own description reflecting its historical function. Given that the Dutch were generally not allowed to leave the island except on official functions, and though various 'entertainments' were available on the island, it must have been very difficult to live here day in day out without being able to venture further afield and given that Christianity was banned they couldn't celebrate Christmas instead telling the authorities they were celebrating the winter solstice
Written 16 December 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

David N
Hawthorne, CA5,045 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2023 • Couples
From 1636 to 1859, this small island is where trade between Europe and Japan was conducted. In order to stop the spread of Western culture, foreigners could only live on this island in all of Japan. Once trade opened up in the 19th Century, the surrounding land was reclaimed and the river was re-routed, but the island was restored in the latter half of the 20th Century. An extensive 3 phase restoration project completed from 2000-2016 has recreated 16 buildings from the early 19th Century. It is now a very popular tourist destination.

There is a lot of historical information presented in audio and textual form in both English and Japanese. I was most impressed by the copper trade, as I was previously unaware that copper had been mined in Japan. As you visit each building, you get a taste of the type of commerce conducted there. I also found the miniature model of Dejima to be very interesting. Finally, there is an extensive exhibit on the influence of Western pottery in Japan.

It can be oppressively hot in the summer, so be sure to bring water along and take some breaks in the air-conditioned buildings.
Written 5 October 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

annette m
Newcastle, Australia186 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2023 • Family
Very interesting place to visit to learn about the history of Nagasaki and the western influence with a mix of Japanese and western style buildings. It is necessary to understand the background of Nagasaki and the Christian influence. The entry was only around $5 each, so not a huge impost. We enjoyed looking at the local school kids all dressed up. It takes about an hour to wander through at a leisurely pace. The gift shop is also filled with local items. Remember to climb up to the 2nd story of one of the buildings and take some photos of the street below. We got off the streetcar at the Dejima stop and then had to walk a fair way and try and work out how to get in as the nearest entry was closed. You have to walk over the river, walk a bit and then walk over another moat bridge to get in. There is a lovely little gift shop outside Irohaya Dejima which sells local goods and not as crowded.
Written 4 April 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Daniel H
Bailey, CO21 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2021
The history of Nagasaki and environs and the opening of Japan to the West is fascinating. My friend Chad Dupont who lives and works in Omura has had a weekly YouTube VLOG, Discovering Nagasaki from a Local, on various topics and venues near Nagasaki and Omura. Episode 11 which features Dejima Island and Museum is well worth checking out.
Written 24 April 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

petertaylor57
Auckland Central, New Zealand422 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2022
Now the little port island sits in the middle of a district of reclaimed land, but a definite effort to recreated the days of the old Dutch traders. Many warehouses and exhibitions, well restored. This will be an even bigger tourist draw as more improvements are made. Well worth a visit.
Written 27 November 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Feel Fukuoka Japan
Kyushu, Japan184 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019 • Friends
Dejima was a man-made island in the port of Nagasaki, constructed in 1636 to segregate Portuguese residents from the Japanese population and control their missionary activities.
Today, Dejima is not an island anymore, as the surrounding area has been reclaimed in the 20th century. However, a number of Dejima's historical structures remain or have been reconstructed in the area, including various residences, warehouses, walls and gates. The ultimate goal is to convert Dejima back into an island by digging canals around all its four sides.
Written 24 June 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Gille4Travel
Tokyo, Japan64 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2020 • Family
High quality and investigative restauration of the former Dutch trade post in Nagasaki. Explanations available in multiple languages. very attentive staff.
Written 20 July 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jan W
42 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2017 • Couples
It is amazing to see how the Dutch were the only ones allowed to trade and interact with the Japanese during the Shogunate (16th to 19th century). You can see how the Dutch inhabitants lived on the island and how they had to do their business.

It is a bit of a pity that it is no longer an island as it is now enclosed by newer reclaimed land.

The Sieboldhuis in Leiden did a great job helping the Japanese researching the archives and helping the Japanese creating this marvelous museum.

It is interesting to learn that the Dutch traders were not allowed to bring their families. On the other hand, they were allowed to have the concubines (prostitutes) from the neighboring area to visit them. In fact these ladies ended up staying for long periods and also had children who were regarded as Japanese and could not join their fathers when leaving. The Nagasaki gene pole must have inherited some Dutch genes!
Written 16 October 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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