Tamaudun
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Monday
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Saturday
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Sunday
9:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Top ways to experience Tamaudun and nearby attractions

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as waiting time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles420 reviews
Excellent
83
Very good
179
Average
136
Poor
21
Terrible
1

Gardengel-IoW
West Sussex, UK889 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2023 • Couples
I do appreciate the history and significance of the Mausoleum, but as a tourist attraction - no.
It is just very dull and grey.
It isnt expensive to get in but I would rather have spent my time doing something else I am afraid
Written 20 July 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Zimminaroundtheworld
Okinawa Prefecture, Japan1,957 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2021
Built in 1501, the mausoleum was built to re-entomb King Sho En and is the Royal Mausoleum. I recommend visiting the mausoleum while touring the Shuri Castle as it is right down the street and part of the UNESCO sites of Okinawa. There is an entrance fee of 300 Yen to enter Tamaudun. Prior to visiting the mausoleum there is a small museum down stairs that has some information on the mausoleum and royal family. It's a small museum but well worth a visit. After the exhibit, I walked to the mausoleum. The area was very nicely preserved, the first portion was an open area with raked gravel prior to entering in the area with the mausoleums. This area was fascinating and large. I loved the little shisa on the handrails and decorations on the walls. You can't actually walk up to the structures but enjoy them from a distance. A visit to the Tamaudun was an interesting experience and worthwhile.
Written 23 May 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

無名
World9,915 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2019 • Solo
For some odd reason, the thing that struck me the most here was the older woman who was raking the dirt of footprints and leaves. I felt like she was still in the service of the kings, probably doing this her whole life while watching the world come and go. Something very attractive and calming about her being here. The tomb itself was a bit bland for lack of a better word. I don't think you are able to go inside which is probably a good thing; you just get to see the outside of the place, and it doesn't seem that big or even "special." The little museum itself was kind of interesting especially the urns on display. I found myself comparing this place to the royal tombs in Hue, Vietnam and it doesn't even come close to matching the scope and grandeur of those tombs. Oh yeah, there was also a crazy looking tree I enjoyed looking at.
Written 14 December 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

geomom01
Leesville, SC1,462 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2019 • Solo
If you are already visiting Shuri Castle, this is worth a visit. It costs about $3 and takes no more than ten minutes. It is right across the street from the Shuri entrance gate. There are two sites: the preparation building and the Mausoleum. Watch your head going through the low doorway.
Written 28 October 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Peter R.
Ulsan, South Korea1,422 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2019 • Solo
Nearly gave the Tam-u-dun Mausoleum a miss after seeing the number of 'negative' reviews on Trip Advisor (most commenting on the lack of access to the tombs or complaining that there was "nothing much to see" at the Site). On the contrary, I found the Tam-u-dun Mausoleum to be the most interesting and informative exhibit I encountered on the island of Okinawa.
The three compartments that comprise the Mausoleum face northwards and is built up against a natural rock outcrop to the south. The Central compartment is where remains were kept for a limited time before the bones were washed and interred in burial urns; Kings, Queens and Crown Princes were then interred in the East Room with remaining members of the royal family in the West Room.
Built in 1501 to house the re-interred remains of Shō En (1415 ~ 1476), 17 of the 19 kings of the Second Shō Dynasty who ruled between 1470 and 1879 are entombed here. The last internee was former Prince of Nakagusuku, Shō Ten (1864 ~ 1920), the son of the Ryukyu Kingdom's last king, and interred as recently as 1920.
The structure suffered extensive damage in the 1945 battle of Okinawa, but the tombs and royal remains themselves remained intact. Although much of the structure has since been restored, unsurprisingly the tombs themselves are off-limits to the general public. It is essential therefore to visit the Museum (located downstairs from the Ticket Office) before proceeding to the Site itself, in order to put the whole exhibit into context.
The Museum contains many contemporary photographs from before WWII; that show the devastation wreaked on the Site as a result of the 1945 battle of Okinawa and others that show the extensive restoration carried out between 1975 and 1984. Most interesting are the contemporary photographs that show the actual contents of the tombs; some 37 urns in East Room, a single urn in the Central compartment and a further 32 urns in West Room. Plan layouts and scale models have the individual urns numbered and cross-referenced to the particular king/queen they contain, although I had to look up Wikipedia on my return to get an English version.
All-in-all I found the whole exhibit fascinating and sufficiently intriguing to further research this peculiarly Okinawan ritual of "senkotsu"; i.e. 3 & 7-years following death, family members wash the bones of their deceased ancestors after the flesh has disappeared as a mark of respect. The bones are then placed in these small earthenware containers and interred in a Mausoleum.
Written 6 March 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

sakura_wingz
Sydney, Australia143 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2018 • Solo
300 yen for a no English museum- the mausoleum itself is kinda old and cool but it takes two minutes to take it in.
Don't bother!
Written 15 December 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

JC125
Adelaide, Australia32 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2018 • Solo
I visited the shurijo castle park and walked around to see anything worth to go, and this place comes up. So I took a chance.
There is not much thing to see tbh. You can't go inside any tombs, and you just be able to see 3 stone rooms with door from the open area.
Written 15 November 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Mr_Nobody_1979
Krakow, Poland3,905 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2018 • Couples
Burial area of upper and ruling class of Ryukyu Kingdom, but these are off the limits for the visitors. What’s to see is very small exhibition with some explanation and general grounds. It costs 300 JPY to enter, way to much for what’s worth.
Written 4 September 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Geraldine F
Enderby167 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2018 • Couples
An UNESCO site; walking distance from the Shuri Castle; an interesting place to visit; entrance fee is inexpensive
Written 25 August 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

KGB777
Singapore, Singapore41,376 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2018 • Solo
This is a fairly small site located close to the Shurijo castle and is easily combined with a visit there. It's a world heritage site so if you're into ticking lists then you may like to visit here. There's also a small museum at the ticket office which is included in the entrance fee.
Written 2 June 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Tamaudun - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024) - Tripadvisor

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