Mother Teresa's Missionaries of Charity

Mother Teresa's Missionaries of Charity

Mother Teresa's Missionaries of Charity
4.5
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Monday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday
9:00 AM - 5:00 PM
What people are saying
Mother Teresa’s home of Missionaries of Charity
5.0 of 5 bubblesJan 2020
An idealist and compassionate girl born in Skopje (now capital of North Macedonia) lived in Skopje till age of 18. She wanted to become a nun. She lived for a while in Ireland before moving to India which became her home. On 7 Th October 1950 she formed an Organization and named it Missionaries of Charity. What started as a small group of 12 people has become an organisation spread in about 20 countries and served by over 3500 sisters. That person became known to the whole world as “Mother Teresa” later named as Saint Teresa by the Vatican. Her Mission was to work for the poor, the hungry, the abandoned, the lepers, the sick, the old, the destitute, drug addicts, alcoholics and virtually all those, who society did not care for. She established schools, soup kitchens, shelters, leper colonies. She cared for the orphans, the old and the AIDS victims with unparalleled compassion. We visited the Missionaries of Charity House In Kolkata, where it all began. We were moved to see her small room with virtually no luxuries. There was no fan, no air conditioning, no tv or radio. She lived a life of simplicity and insisted that her organisation followed her example. We saw her tomb. It was the simplicity after her life.. In the room nearby there were a few pictures telling her story. Since 1962 she received over 700 awards - minor and major. Notable among the awards are the Nobel Peace Prize, Bharat Ratna- India’s highest Civilian award, Jawahar Lal Award, John F Kennedy International award, US Congressional Gold Medal, Soviet Union’s Gold Medal of the Peace Committee and the Order of Merit from Queen Elizabeth.. She didn’t aspire for any of it but accepted the awards with humility on behalf of Missionaries of Charity. Her true reward was the hope, happiness and gratitude in the eyes of the souls she served.. When in Kolkata, do visit the Missionaries of Charity..

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4.5
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madabouttravel
Cheddar, UK138 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
We visited "Mother Teresa's mission" during our brief visit to Agra. I had read about the Missionaries a little while ago and really wanted to visit in order to understand and see their work first hand. The taxi driver that took us there said that in the three years he had been running tourists around, not one person had asked to be taken there. Here's what I have to say. Yes, by all means go see the Taj Mahal - it is a wondrous building with incredible detail, but please leave a little time to visit Sister Glory and the Missionaries of Charity and donate anything you can (they rely soley on donations for everything). They are always in need of basic medial supplies such as sticking plasters, latex gloves, syringes, antibiotics as well as multi-vitamins. For the school age children (and some of the adults), exercise books/paper/pens/pencils etc. Clothing for adults, children and babies is always welcome. Even if you can't squeeze any of these or similar items into your luggage, then take along some sweets/candy and go witness the love and care these wonderful missionaries offer to men, women and children who have been cast aside by society. You cannot fail to come away untouched and, perhaps, wanting to do a little more. The mission is 10 mins from the railway station and is open for visitors between 2-6 p.m.
Written 27 November 2009
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

varun b
Chandigarh, India2 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2010
It was a live project but lately we admit that it should be within you who will serve these people.There was no age bar from 1 month baby to 80yr old man everyone struggling for there lives in a small bracket of world.We served them with eatables and we cannot give you the feel we felt after serving them.
People who give donations in temple should also contribute some for them also its not about how much money you give but its all about the love and affection in terms of food and hospitality items.
WE ARE BLESSED HOPE YOU ALSO WANT THE SAME....
Written 31 January 2011
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Amolak Rattan K
New Delhi, India2,987 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2018 • Friends
When you visit this place, you will understand the value of giving and selfless service to the society. Mother Teresa had dedicated her entire life serving the poor and needy people. She had won a Noble Prize also and had attained Sainthood. Must visit this place.
Amolak Rattan Kohli
Former Governor of Mizoram
Written 28 April 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

connectedmachines
Tokyo, Japan27 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2014 • Friends
I had a very different experience this Easter. I have been contributing financially to ministries in India over the past few years and this year, I had the opportunity to travel to India for the first time to interact directly with one of the chapters of the charities founded by Mother Teresa in Agra - Missionaries of Charity (or M.C.).

The facility I had an opportunity to visit in Agra was staffed by 8 sisters that have committed their lives to care for the 200 children in the facility. The children housed in this facility ranged from new born babies who were sick or born to very poor families, to young children who had been abused or abandoned, to older children who were invalid and needed constant care of the Sisters because of their physical or mental disabilities.

The facility was clean, but the small building within the compound were very old. Walking through the facility with my host who was dressed in her familiar white sari with blue trimming, I visited the dormitories where the children lived in - twenty or more beds packed up against each other to maximize the space available.

Between the 8 sisters, they cook, clean and care for the 200 children - mothers to every one of them.

I had called ahead to find out what they needed and my partner and I brought as many bags of rice, dahl (lentils) and biscuits as we could carry (which was not many) and placed them in a locked room that acted as a pantry.

I was stunned that it had almost no supplies left in it. How would they feed so many with so little food left? Where were the medical, cleaning and food supplies?

The Sister who brought me around saw my quizzed expression. They keep the facility operating solely on generosity of others in a country where less than 2% of the population are Christian. Giving has gone down in the recent years, she commented. My mind was racing. How can this be with the rising affluence of India? What about the government, can't they help? What can be done?

She watched me intently as I was desperately grasping for a solution. And all I saw in her face was the biggest smile. Picking up one of the young kids around her, all I could see in her face and the little one's was joy and a faith that someone they could trust was going to take care of them and everything was going to be alright.

It was an incredible moment of learning for me - the trust the little one had in the Sister holding her was a perfect mirror of the trust the Sister had in God.

"Won't you stay and join us for mass, we're just about to start our Easter service," the Sister asked as we made our way to the room that acted as the makeshift chapel. Some of the older ones had already taken their seats in the wooden pews outside the chapel that acted as an overflow area.

A part of me wanted to be with them, but a part of me couldn't and that part won out. I felt unprepared and under-equipped to handle the situation. Apart from the mass being in Hindi, I didn't know how to cope with the young kids with physical disabilities pushing themselves around me on wooden carts, older kids with metal disabilities staring at this unfamiliar stranger who had entered their space and grabbing at me.

The Sister brought me to the room beside the chapel and offered me a seat. I took out the small donation I had prepared and placed it on the table. She took out a receipt book and asked me to write up my own receipt. I filled in my details and she tore out my section. Receipt no. 20.

What? Receipt no. 20? No.

God bless you, she said, as she received my offering. God bless you too, Sister. I really wanted to give her a hug and encourage her to keep up the important work that she does. But I probably needed to hear those words more than she did.

To serve those that are suffering the deepest; that the world has forgotten, day in and day out sacrificially takes a deep commitment to one's call. But the miracle that shines through it is the immutable witness that proclaims that though these little ones may be the least in the world, they are each very much loved and priceless in God's sight.
Written 20 April 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jarmi
Geneva, Switzerland51 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2015
I came to this home one afternoon with a bag full of toys for children. My driver went to sisters room to let them know that I was there, but nobody came to say hello or offered to show me the place. So I went by myself to see children and spend some time with them. I held the babies, played with them and started giving them toys. Still no one from adults showed up. Not that I needed a big thank you but perhaps expected some interest on the adult side to show me the place and answer my questions on how I could further help the home. Nobody seemed to care. At least the place seemed clean and saw a playground there as well. Hope children are taken care of properly. I left it with a mixed feelings.
Written 6 November 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Fran HP
London, UK39 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2015 • Friends
As requested by the people that work at this amazing place, I urge you to do some research and find another charity to donate your gifts to. They said because of trip advisor they have more than enough and that they are donating the stuff they are given to other charities.
Written 19 August 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

FussyNYWorkingMom
New York City, NY76 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2014 • Friends
I was so moved by the work these sisters do with so many beautiful children, many disabled, as well as disabled adults. There are 9 sisters caring for 200, including 53 children, although they do have some helpers. Many of the children had been left at the mission's doorstep.

I am a somewhat nervous (and fussy) traveler, so had prepared myself for the conditions to be difficult for me but they weren't at all. Despite the obvious and incredible challenges the community must face, it was a very clean, bright and cheerful environment. The sisters are doing amazing work. I felt very humbled by our visit and inspired by these incredible women and their lives of service.

Some tips from what I learned from our visit:

- The children all nap between 2-3:30 and there are services at 5 pm, so the best times to visit are either mid/late morning or afternoon after their naps.

- They are allowed to directly accept only rupees in cash. Other donations (dollars, checks etc) need to go to their headquarters in Calcutta, so stop by an ATM before your visit.

- I brought vitamins and a few medical supplies from the U.S. in my suitcase, and then on our way we stopped at the grocery store and bought large bags of rice, lentils, naan mix, spices, packaged biscuits and cookies, toothpaste and brushes, and a box of apples. We were able to buy 8 big bags of food for $120 USD. After we arrived I wished I had brought even more.

Like other posters I would never have known about this mission if I hadn't seen it first on Trip Advisor. A big thank you to whomever first posted about it. It was a very meaningful and beautiful part of our trip, and I wish we had had more time for our visit. I will definitely make the mission a priority for my next trips.
Written 25 October 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Donna6262
Morristown, NJ USA2 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Thank you for sharing this information. Very Helpful. I will for sure stop by...and contribute. This is a real service you've done by posting.
Written 16 January 2010
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Calling India Tour
New Delhi, India167 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2019
The Missionaries of Charity (Latin: Missionariarum a Caritate) is a Roman Catholic (Latin Church) religious congregation established in 1950 by Mother Teresa, now known in the Catholic Church as Saint Teresa of Calcutta. In 2012 it consisted of over 4,500 religious sisters. Members of the order designate their affiliation using the order's initials, "M.C." A member of the congregation must adhere to the vows of chastity, poverty, obedience, and the fourth vow, to give "wholehearted free service to the poorest of the poor."[1] Today, the order consists of both contemplative and active branches in several countries.
Written 4 April 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Katie1979
Coventry, UK1,510 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2016 • Couples
This place had to be the highlight of our time in India, and definitely the most worthwhile. Regardless of your religious beliefs, you should make the time to visit here.
The children were all spotlessly clean, and dressed in decent clothes, which was a comfort to us. We visited on a Saturday mid afternoon so there was no school in session and everyone was either lounging on their bed or sat up against the walls.
The lovely nun (nothing like the ones who taught at my convent!) came out to meet us and gratefully accepted the bags of clothes, felt tips and stickers we'd brought.
She then proceeded to show us round the facility so we could spend time with the residents.
We saw men and women with physical or mental disabilities, elderly people with simply nowhere else to go, and lots of teenagers, children and babies.
The thing that struck us was the fact that all of these people seemed so happy to see us, and so unaffected by their circumstances. All they wanted to do was to chat to us, and hug us.
We made sure to go along the rows of people who were unable to move and to hold everyone's hand and maintain some eye contact. The feeling we had was surely more beneficial to us as we felt so honoured to have spent time with them.
In the nurseries we managed to have a few cuddles with some of the children, which came with its own perils. I have to admit I sneaked off to a room with small babies in to quickly shed the tears I'd been fighting off! I felt it would have been disrespectful to have been sad in a place where nobody feels sorry for themselves, but the emotion got the better of me.
We ended the tour by making a donation, which was entirely our choice, there was no pressure to do so.
If you have the opportunity to visit you really must, it will make you a better person, whilst also benefiting the people who live there.
Written 1 June 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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