Dingling Underground Palace

Dingling Underground Palace

Dingling Underground Palace
3.5
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as waiting time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


3.5
3.5 of 5 bubbles85 reviews
Excellent
23
Very good
27
Average
27
Poor
5
Terrible
3

LG_Kay
Singapore, Singapore7,519 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2019
This is the only unearthed palace of the 13 imperial tombs of the Ming Dynasty. The Underground Palace is divided into five vaulted halls, i.e. front, middle, rear, left and right.

The rear vaulted hall is the main hall, with 3 white marble thrones, one for the emperor and one for each empress. This place was crowded and noisy, as I had to contend with the local tour groups. Note that at Dingling tomb entrance, there is a security check on bag and note no lighter is allowed.
Written 9 November 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Moramare
Amstelveen, The Netherlands458 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2019 • Family
On our way back from the wall we ended up visiting this site of the Ming tombs. We might have settled on the wrong one but were just not impressed. We expected a similar experience as visiting the graves in Luxor but well, nothing like it. The underground palace is nice and cool ( a bonus on a hot summer day) but empty. Yes, there were 3 thrones and yes, there we 3 red boxes that were replicas of the coffins but that was all there was to see. Not worth the detour!
Written 23 July 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Salamandrine
33 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2019 • Friends
We visited the underground palace and the Sacred Way following a trip to Mutianyu, and, whilst the site was impressive and certainly an important stop off, the lack of signage and information in the epicentre of the site (the actual underground section), was a tad disappointing. However, the outside section was well signed, and the site and facilities were certainly well maintained.
Written 9 July 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

-Guzzis-are-ace-
Melbourne, Australia1,063 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2019 • Couples
The Dingling Underground Tombs are well worth a visit, we combined these with a visit to Badaling Great Wall in one day from Beijing. There is a bit of walking and quite a few stairs but it’s definitely interesting and worth a look, admission is not expensive. Take some small notes to make offerings within the tombs! A great day in historical China.
Written 7 May 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Californiamama145
Riverside, CA721 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2019 • Family
We visited this tomb on our way to see the great wall. It had an interesting underground tomb/palace to see. There wasn’t as much to see In the underground tomb but the grounds were impressive with lots to see.
Written 1 April 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

653mikejones
4 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2018
Really nice day trip from Beijing, its worth planning transport to multiple tombs especially the one you can go inside.
Written 12 February 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Betty
2,879 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2018 • Family
This is the only underground Ming tomb that is open. There is a short queue to go inside to see the replica coffins and the marble thrones. The original coffins and many artifacts have long been destroyed. The tomb is worth a visit although it is mostly empty of its original artifacts. The area around the tomb has a few nice structures and courtyard. It was a nice visit but there really isn’t a lot to see.

**If you are superstitious, do not walk the middle stone path reserved for the emperor since that is the path of the coffin. Walk to the side. The living emperor uses the left side and the imperial family uses the right side.
Written 16 October 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Avesta
Singapore, Singapore645 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2017 • Couples
Out of the 13 Ming Tombs, Ding Ling is the only tomb that has been fully excavated and visitors could enter the underground palace. Ding Ling is the burial tomb of Emperor Wanli and his two empresses. From the ticket office, we walked through the large rectangular shape court yard, where we passed by the ruins of Ling'en Gate and Ling'en Hall. We did not see any structure at all, except for the platform that was still visible. The rest of the structures were already destroyed. There're two exhibition halls over here, one on the left and the other on the right. The exhibition halls introduce the history and life of the tomb occupants (the emperor and his empresses), as well as exhibits of many of the unearthed sacrificial relics from the tomb. We followed the pathway and skirt around the Soul Tower and mound to reach the entrance to the underground palace. The entire underground palace is built using stone bricks. It's not very big and consists of 5 chambers. The left and right chambers are empty, which is believed for the emperor's concubines. In the middle chamber, we could see 3 stone thrones of the emperor and empresses in the centre of the chamber. The rear chamber is the most impressive, which we could see 3 wooden coffins and many smaller boxes, all coloured in red. Note that all these are replicas, as the original ones have already decayed. In the Museum of the Ming Tombs, visitors would get to see the photos of the original conditions when the archaeologists first entered the chamber. The largest coffin belongs to the emperor, flanked by 2 smaller coffins of the empresses. The smaller boxes contain the sacrificial items, which are now on exhibit in the 2 exhibition halls at the courtyard and the Museum of the Ming Tombs. At the antechamber, there's a TV set that shows the documentary on how the archaeologists first managed to open the locked marble door, which has a self locking mechanism that seems impossible to unlock at first. After this, we passed through the Diamond Wall (which is the original entrance to the underground palace) and exited the place. Near to the ticket office, there's another exhibition hall named Museum of the Ming Tombs. This place is not very big and it introduces the history and life of all the Ming emperors and their burial tombs. There's also a lot of information and photographs related to the excavation of Ding Ling (定陵) underground palace, along with many exhibits on the unearthed treasures from the underground palace.
Written 29 September 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Anette M
Pretoria, South Africa67 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2018 • Couples
If you are interested in Chinese history you should visit this tomb, with a guide. Alice have us good history about the tomb and its discovery, which was by accident, as there were no written records. There are 3 sarcophogi of the emperor and the empress as well as his concubine who was eventually declared empress by her son. He hated his father, the emperor, and wrote a scathing epitaph on the tombstone, which is not above the tomb itself.
Written 29 May 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Rachel P
Perth, Australia734 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2018 • Family
Lovely place to visit with some interesting history. It's difficult to imagine how it was built so many years ago. There were a lot of stairs and walking. Lovely view at the end. It was a bit boring for the kids but they had a bit of a run around.
Written 21 May 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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