Dolmabahce Palace
Dolmabahce Palace
4.5
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Tuesday
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Wednesday
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Thursday
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Friday
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Saturday
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Sunday
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
About
This palace was built in the mid 1800s to replace an earlier structure that was made of wood. The new palace incorporated sixteen separate buildings with stables, a flour mill and a clock tower among them.
Duration: 2-3 hours
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from ₹3,573.28
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  • Richard Y
    Camberley, United Kingdom66 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Amazing place with stunning scale
    There are lots of scare stories online about huge queues and lots of businesses telling you to pay loads of money to skip the queue. Maybe we just got lucky but we queued for maybe five minutes and were in (approx 11am). It costs 650 lira per adult if you're a foreigner. You need some form of if ID to get an audio guide - one id per audio guide. The guide was good in places but quite limited. There wasn't much history included, it was mainly which company made the chandeliers etc. All a bit mundane. You'll be asked to wear shoe covers that are provided and they ask you not to take any pictures. I'm not sure why. The place is huge. Initially I was reminded of an English stately home and then I was blown away by some of the opulence and sheer scale of the place. The harem was included in our ticket but was a bit of a let down as it was mainly yet another receiving room or series of apartments. Throughout, the general levels of signage and information were poor which is where this loses a star. The overall experience would probably be enhanced by a knowledgeable guide but simple things like for example, a randomly put together display of five guns with nothing to tell you about them and why they're being displayed just don't help at all. This was similar the whole way through. The gardens were closed and the aviary and clock museum also looked closed though to be honest after three hours I just needed to sit down. It was 30 degrees on the day that we visited and surprisingly pleasant inside the building. As we came out at about 2pm there was quite a big queue and in the sun it would have been a hot 15-20 mins for the people waiting.
    Visited July 2023
    Travelled as a couple
    Written 4 July 2023
  • Archie
    Glenmoore, Pennsylvania7,347 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Beautiful palace with amazing decor
    This palace is not included in the Istanbul pass for foreigners. There is a fast track line where you pay extra. It's right next to the Bosphorous and the tram station. Give it a couple of hours to visit. You are not allowed photography inside the palace. There are some beautiful shots outside you can take in the gardens and at the gates. There are so many people trying to take pictures inside the palace that the guards have to constantly remind people. You have to wear a clean shoe covering that they provide. I hope they resuse them as its plastic. You need a new one for each part of the palace. The harem sections are beautifully maintained. The hamam, waiting rooms, receiving rooms, bedrooms are all beautifully decorated. There are a lot of European influences. Definitely take the audio guide, you need to leave an ID and you will get it back when you return the guide. We enjoyed walking around and admiring the decor. There is a museum for the paintings and one for the Sultan. There are two sections closed for restoration. Its an interesting experience.
    Visited July 2023
    Travelled with family
    Written 7 July 2023
  • Soumya Nayak
    Dubai, United Arab Emirates651 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    HUGE
    I have seen palaces in many countries but none of them came close to the Mysore Palace in grandeur & size until I saw Dolmabahce Palace. There is a huge garden area in front of the palace. We can take an audio guide to get information on the various rooms & decor of the palace. The King's Court is the final room before exit. It is massive with wide pillars & high ceiling. The architecture of the entire palace is wonderful. The outdoor side area of the palace has tall wall with multiple gates, it has Bosphorus strait on the other side. The gate is a good photo spot. The palace is open on specific days of the week, so please check before your visit.
    Visited June 2023
    Travelled with family
    Written 9 July 2023
  • Aneeqa A
    Chester, New York3 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Magnificent!!
    Loved it. It was sooooo magnificent that you can’t believe your eyes. I recommend booking via tour of you don’t mind long waiting lines, or go early morning when it opens. Our guide explained us the history and then we were on our own. It is a MUST SEE!!
    Visited August 2023
    Travelled with family
    Written 26 August 2023
  • Mohamed Sami
    Alexandria, Egypt1,709 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Modern Ottoman masterpiece
    This modern European-style palace was built by Sultan Abdulmecid I in the 19th century and served for the residence of the Sultan during the last decades of the Ottoman empire and was also the residence of Ataturk during his final years where he died. Though the decline of the empire was already started, the palace was very expensively constructed and it costed more than 35 tons of gold, which highly affected the financial state of the empire, with marble, gold, furniture, chandeliers, carpets and highly decorated walls and ceilings. As usual it also compromises a Harem section. This place is a must to see as expected. A new gallery is now opened for the portraits of the Sultans as well as many paintings of many famous artists acquired during the Ottoman era, this museum also shouldn't be missed.
    Visited September 2022
    Travelled with family
    Written 30 August 2023
  • Alma V
    Tirana, Albania9 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Fantastic
    Magnificient palace, plenty of rooms with different styles. A room for every occassion. At the center of the palace was a huge chandelier with gems and gold. You can pay at the entrance for a audio book guide, wich is in different languages. Wonderful view 😍
    Visited October 2022
    Travelled with friends
    Written 13 September 2023
  • tjjjbel
    Chester, United Kingdom24 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    East meets west opulence- worth the trip
    Excellent audio guide round a beautiful palace - (clear English accents) & interesting mix of east meets west and including spectacular glass chandeliers and Harem with marble bathrooms/hammams. Typical unfriendly, aggressive ticket staff (where do they get them from?) but we’ll worth the tram trip. Very short queue at 10am & in some rooms on our own. Great painting museum but other ancillary displays closed.
    Visited September 2023
    Travelled as a couple
    Written 20 September 2023
  • Phil Weckenmann
    Nuertingen, Germany14 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Beautiful
    We went to the palace because it was recommended to us by friends and it was stunning. It is a beautiful building and the garden is a delight for the eyes. However, entry is a little expensive and you are not allowed to take photos inside the palace. Overall still, I would highly recommend paying it a visit.
    Visited September 2023
    Travelled with friends
    Written 21 September 2023
  • Iris
    Vancouver, Canada58 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Beautiful palace
    Had a good time visiting this gorgeous palace. Free audio tour guide with admission avail in various languages. We passed on this d/t the requirement to surrender our passports to take advantage of the audio guide. Worth visiting.
    Visited October 2023
    Travelled as a couple
    Written 20 October 2023
  • Susan K
    New York City, New York1,035 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    After seeing the waterfront facade of the palace from the Bosphorus, my interest was peaked
    We purchased the only admission ticket offered which included the Selamlik, gardens, Harem, and Art Museum. The Cystal Staircase of Baccarat crystal was very impressive. The palace is opened 9-4 Tuesday to Sunday. We visited on a Sunday and there were many families enjoying the the grounds. There were two lines for tickets and even though they were very long, the line moved quickly. They have a cafe and gift shop. Before entering each of the buildings, you are given plastic shoe covers so flats, and sneakers make it safer to walk. There are lots of stair so be mindful.
    Visited October 2023
    Travelled as a couple
    Written 28 October 2023
These reviews are the subjective opinion of Tripadvisor members and not of TripAdvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

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Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as waiting time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

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Travelingtodiscover
Los Angeles, CA244 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2024 • Family
“Dolmabahçe Palace” (Filled in Garden) Museum is the largest in Turkey.
Baroque and Rococo style palace was built facing out towards the Bosphorus, completed in 1856. It served as the official residence for Ottoman sultans. Palace was one of the masterpiece’s of the Armenian architect Garabet Balyan.
“Dolmabahçe Palace Gate” mesmerizing view right from the Center of Europe and Asia.
It feels good to be lost in the right direction!!! Just do it 👌!!!
Written 11 June 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

roozbeh b
2 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2024 • Solo
So over priced for foreigners. It is seven times more expensive for foreigners than for locals. I think it is not worth of it spending 30 EUR for visiting it.
Written 1 June 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

flekim
Basingstoke, UK148 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2024 • Friends
I think this cost us about £25/pp entrance. In my view it was well worth it.
Beautiful palace, you are led through the downstairs and some of the upstairs of the palace seeing all the rooms which are splendid. Sadly (unless I missed it) they don’t show any bedrooms or the “downstairs” kitchens etc which would have been really nice. I didn’t notice anyone with an audio guide and didn’t ask for one but there are leaflets in all languages.
The gardens are beautiful and it’s all looking out to the sea, so if you can get in before certain tourists who love taking pictures of themselves it’s a good photo opportunity too.
Nice gift shop.
Probably no more than 3 hours is needed there…..I didn’t see a cafe but again I could be mistaken.
Written 1 June 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Alice
16 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2023 • Friends
My journey to Dolmabahçe Palace in Istanbul was a journey through opulence and history. From the moment I stepped foot in its magnificent halls, I was captivated by the palace's grandeur and elegance. The intricate details of the architecture, adorned with lavish decorations and ornate furnishings, reflected the splendor of the Ottoman Empire at its height. Walking through the palace rooms, each more breathtaking than the last, I was transported to a bygone era of sultans and royalty. The highlight was undoubtedly the Crystal Staircase, a masterpiece of craftsmanship that left me in awe of its beauty. The palace's stunning location along the Bosphorus added to its allure, offering panoramic views of the water and the city beyond. Visiting Dolmabahçe Palace was a truly unforgettable experience, and I would highly recommend it to anyone seeking a glimpse into Turkey's rich cultural heritage.
Written 25 May 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Cumbrianhomeandaway
Wigton, UK340 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2024 • Couples
Impressive exterior but inside it seems to be a collection of rooms with chairs! This is probably why they do not allow photography inside as it is boring. The last palace to be used by the Sultans but better to visit the Topkapi Palace for a better experience.
Written 21 May 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

joewC8024SJ
28 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2024 • Couples
The palace is closed on a Monday. This information is hidden away on the website and is only apparent once you have got to the ticket office. ☹️
Written 20 May 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

St_DiaS
17 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2024 • Family
From personal perspective I found Dolmabahce Palace more impressive than Topkapi. Significantly more elaborated and with a lot of different areas to explore it is true jewel of Istanbul's architectural heritage, holding a rich history dating back to the mid-19th century. It took us over 3 hours to visit it. The rooms are gorgeously embellished and do not seem to end. Impressive history in that place: the room in which Ataturk died is also within the place.
The gardens of this sumptuous palace are beautifully care for and the position (it is located on the coast) offers a spectacular view of the Bosporus. Unfortunately you cannot take any pictures inside which was. . . naff.
There was waiting line for the ticket purchase but not a huge one; after 15.00 o'clock it is more relaxed.

An un pleasant thing was the fact that there are different entry ticket prices for tourists vs locals (approx. 1000 lira for foreigners and approx. 100 for Turks; just ten times the difference)
I was also sorry for not being able to visit the the clock museum as it was closed nor see the crystal staircase as it was completely covered ( but not mentioned at the entrance).
Written 7 May 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ak1
Greater London, UK4 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2024 • Couples
Very disappointing. They have closed off most of the rooms so all you get to see are hallways and glimpses of some of the rooms. Majority of the rooms in the palace no just has chairs lined up. Not much to see long queues. The guards shout if u take pictures inside
Written 1 May 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Susan C
Melbourne, Australia1,491 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2024 • Couples
This palace is the largest in Turkey and was in use from 1856 to 1887, 1909 to 1922 and as the summer presidential palace for Atatürk from 1924 to 1938. Unlike Topkapi and Beylerbeyi Palaces this palace has a very European air about it, decked out in gold and crystal and with furniture and oil paintings brought from Europe. It reminded me of the Viennese palaces of the Hungarian-Austrian era. All the rooms are fully outfitted. You will see a lot of chairs, tables, chandeliers, vases, etc. Most decoration of the rooms is fairly muted but occasionally there will be a room which is colourful and awe inspiring.

Despite its European feel the palace was still divided into the men's public area and and the women's very private, less European style, harem. Throughout the carpets and bathrooms have a very Turkish feel. Moreover, this palace felt designed to be a practical administrative centre with rooms for secretaries and meeting halls as well as private areas for the royal family. In general the more privileged lived on the seaward side while lesser administrators were on the land side. The big halls had entries to the sea and to the land and were large enough to have horses enter.

There are placards in the main rooms and the direction of travel is clear. An audio guide is included in the price but you have to leave two forms of ID (passport, room key, etc) to obtain it or leave a 100 Euro deposit. It is worthwhile as it automatically activates when you reach a particular point and has more detail than the placards. There are a number of smaller rooms without any signposting or audio information at all. Two, in particular, we wondered if they were children’s or maids rooms. There are side rooms that you only get a peek at from the door and some where you aren’t able to see the whole room from the door.

The Harem, with its separate entrance, displays the Sultan’s mother’s and wives' apartments. There were a number of wives apartments where you only see the entrance to it with the side rooms totally unseen. Near the end of the Harem though there is a chance to see into the rooms of two wives apartments, one on the upper floor and one on the ground floor though their layout does not appear the same as the ones you merely saw the entrance for. Of interest is Atatürk's room on the second floor located in the former harem area. It is still outfitted as it was when he died.

The entry price for the Dolmabahçe Palace allows you to also visit the grounds and the Harem as well as the National Palaces Paintings Museum. We needed to show our ticket at each of these entry points. No photos at all inside are allowed. You need to put on disposable shoe coverings at each of the three places. We took about an hour for each place. The Clock Museum and Crystal Museums were closed when we visited. The gardens are pretty and you can walk alongside the Bosporus Strait. There are ample toilets and cafes.
Written 1 May 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Stephen M
London, UK4 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2024 • Couples
Expensive, within the palace you are kept away from most side rooms which do not allow the visitors a full view, there are no notices relate to your location. Overall not a great visitor experience
Written 24 April 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Dolmabahce Palace - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024) - Tripadvisor

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