Slave House of Togo
Slave House of Togo
4

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Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as waiting time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

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4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles21 reviews
Excellent
9
Very good
5
Average
3
Poor
2
Terrible
2

Gifford L
2 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2023
I couldn't bring myself to rate this place as an excellent experience but rather an emotionally painful experience. However, I hastened to add that the guide at the house was very knowledgeable and informative which was an excellent experience indeed.

The Slave House (Wood House) should be a must visit for all to grasp the enormity and depth of man’s capacity to inflict such abominable acts of inhumanity to their fellow beings. Particularly, when any group is considered less worthy and valued. We should all strive to do whatever we can however small the deed might be, to prevent such atrocities from continuing to happen.

It saddens me to see such an historic building in a state disrepair.
Written 17 April 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

GoranWembley
United Kingdom4,100 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2018 • Friends
Agbodrago is the home of Maison d'Esclaves, the last slave trading institutions before the abolition of slavery. Well spent an hour of our time on the way to Togoville.
Written 3 July 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

vernonb689
Philadelphia, PA132 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2019 • Friends
The "Slave House" in Agbodrafo, Togo was built in 1835 by a Scottish enslavement trader: John Henry Wood. The House was built as part of the infrastructure to continue the enslavement trade in Togo. The Wood House had a cellar about 2 meters high where people were warehoused until they could be transported to the Americas and the Caribbean. Captives were housed in this cramped dark cellar for weeks and sometimes months. Visitors may experience the horror of this confinement through a trap door in the living room. It is likely that many small enslavement houses such as this were used to continue the illegal sale of humans. The Wood House has been designated as UNESCO site and guides offer a stunning description. Entry fee is about 2 USD.
Written 25 February 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

DanielD525
London, UK1,312 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2019 • Couples
A very short tour but a vital cog in the slave trade industry. Entrance is 2000 cfa per person which included a very informative guide who spoke decent enough English too. The building is in poor condition that requires desperate need of renovation, hopefully with donations and the increase of tourism, then perhaps the future's perspective is promising.
The building is divided into two floors, with the dark confined basement home to the slaves and the ground floor accommodating the staff. The guide will open the hatch door for you to experience life for a few seconds in the confined basement, imagining how lifeless times were. Lots of the floor panels and buildings exterior remains original, hence the reason for an upheaval. Thanks to our guide giving us the relevant info, otherwise without him we'd of been viewing an empty house minus the facts. Make sure your driver is good as this place is difficult to find, also not sure if this is Unesco certified although whs are aware rather than giving it approval just yet..
Written 29 January 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Dan8319
Ludwigsburg, Germany942 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2017 • Solo
Slavery was a horrible thing, but the psychology of it is even worse. You'll learn a lot at this place, it's eye-opening.
I went with Noour Voyages, and my guide was able to get an English-speaking guide in about 2 minutes. This is a horrible, amazing place to go...
Written 3 September 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Djesika D
Heerlen, The Netherlands180 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2016 • Friends
The house is a real eye-opener. We had a translator with us, so we got to learn a lot about the history of the house. After the explanation we we're allowed to crawl underneath the floor. This was a very confronting and emotional experience. an important lesson from the past, not to be missed.
Written 4 May 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

tolovetolive
Dubai, United Arab Emirates69 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2016
There is not much to see although it is hoped that this site will be developed into a museum in the future. Unfortunately all of the available guides speak French only so we couldn't access much of it. One plus - you can climb down beneath the house giving a real insight into slave living conditions.
Written 14 December 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Nexx
Lagos, Nigeria5 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2016 • Solo
The story behind the slave house in Togo is one that needs to be heard at the location. It is riveting. My guide Jeremies was the best and also the manager of the attraction. It was the most memorable(apart from the nice local food) part of my vacation.
Written 22 October 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Moira H
11 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2016 • Couples
This is a little difficult to find, our driver had to stop a few times to ask directions but the local people were very helpful. It is about a 45 minute drive from Lome towards the Benin border. The guide was very knowledgeable & spoke good English, he welcomed questions too. The entrance is CFA 2000 ($3.50) for foreigners which we thought was reasonable. The house is in pretty bad repair but you can still get the feel of the place & see where the slaves were kept & the traders lived. It is possible to walk around the house & look at the old furniture, as well as go down into where the slaves were held. There are a few souvenir stalls outside where we found the prices to be much more reasonable than the Grande Marche. A few miles away there is a well where the slaves were forced to wash before boarding the ships. This is also a UNESCO site & is sign posted from the main road. Our driver again had to ask a few people but we found it easily. It is worth a visit to have the full experience.
Written 28 August 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

R J
New Orleans, LA24 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2014 • Friends
The slave house or "Maison des Esclaves" was one of the last clandestine slave trading houses in operation after the abolition of slavery. Located less than a mile from the beach, the house was the last stop for slaves before boarding slave ships off the coast of Togo. The Afro-Brazilian style building has one main floor and a sub floor where slaves were hidden while waiting for shipment.
Tour guide was very knowledgeable and spoke english proficiently. You're allowed to climb into the cramped subfloor where they housed the slaves and take a look. Building was recognized by UNESCO as part of the slave trade route. There is a souvenir shop with local artisan items.

Donations Encouraged

The house is in dire need of preservation and repairs, however it has a a lot of potential. Its small but worth visiting. Where else can you visit the ORIGIN of the international slave trade.
Written 8 June 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
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Slave House of Togo - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024) - Tripadvisor

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