Palazzo Medici Riccardi
Palazzo Medici Riccardi
4
9:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Monday
9:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Tuesday
9:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Thursday
9:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Friday
9:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Saturday
9:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Sunday
9:00 AM - 7:00 PM
About
The first Medici palace, the home of Cosimo the Elder and Lorenzo the Magnificent and the workplace of artists of the calibre of Donatello, Michelangelo, Paolo Uccello, Benozzo Gozzoli and Botticelli. The Renaissance house… where it all began.
Duration: 2-3 hours
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The area
Address
Neighbourhood: Florence Historic Center
How to get there
  • Alamanni-Stazione Santa Maria Novella • 10 min walk
Reach out directly
See what travellers are saying
  • Jeyhun M
    Baku, Azerbaijan67 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    The place with a huge history
    Architecturally very nice building that impresses with its rustication elements in the facade. There is an inside garden with a small fountain and mosaics. Interior frescas and collection of art are amazing. The ceiling fresca and decorations in the grand hall by Luca Giordano are breathtaking. Part of the building is occupied by the city administration, but it is not very much distracting.
    Visited July 2023
    Travelled as a couple
    Written 16 July 2023
  • VoyagerAimerSourire
    Princeton, New Jersey760 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    If you are craving Baroque in the cradle of the Rennaissance
    Florence and the Rennaissance are eternally linked, but if ever you want to see some other artistic period in history represented, there is the Palazzo Medici Riccardi. We visited during the Luca Giordano exhibit, showing his preparatory drawings (held at other museums) for his Baroque fresco at the Palazzo. The rest of the Palazzo is very interesting as well, cutting through several centuries of art history in Florence. All in a venue that is not overrun by the summer tourist crowds. Great place to switch artistic gears!
    Visited July 2023
    Written 13 August 2023
  • David Y
    Boston, Massachusetts3 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Well worth it
    Found this to be an interesting place to visit. Very relaxed with incredible artwork. You got the feel of the building and the chapel and the ceiling of the Mirror Gallery are unforgettable. Near the Academia gallery where the statue of David is. We were sightseeing after seeing David and this was relaxed and not crowded, a welcome change.
    Visited October 2023
    Travelled as a couple
    Written 8 October 2023
  • LesleyDublin
    Dublin, Ireland256 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    The home of the Medicis, a lovely building
    This is where the Medici family actually lived. We booked tickets in advance for early in the morning and we went straight in. The chapel of the Magi is on the first floor. You are only allowed in for 5 minutes as it is quite small and groups of 10 go in at a time. You just have time to look around it and take pictures. There is another stunning room, A Mirror Gallery. It’s a lovely building to walk around. There is an indoor and outdoor courtyard and garden. There was also a display of busts downstairs and two other exhibitions. One was of modern tapestries and pictures ( from the 1930s) which were very colourful. I really enjoyed this building. It was one of my favourite in Florence.
    Visited October 2023
    Travelled as a couple
    Written 29 October 2023
  • Chris Gilbane
    Manchester, United Kingdom195 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    Overpriced, not that interesting, looks like poor conservation
    This was a medici palace, was then bought by another family and is now a municipal building.. It's more of a town hall with some old stuff, some paintings and a few really decent rooms. Some of the hanging tapestries are very faded and have light direct on them which seems very weird from a conservation perspective Not worth the money and I.like my history.
    Visited June 2024
    Travelled as a couple
    Written 28 June 2024
These reviews are the subjective opinion of Tripadvisor members and not of TripAdvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as waiting time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Popular mentions

4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles1,040 reviews
Excellent
471
Very good
332
Average
129
Poor
64
Terrible
44

Chris Gilbane
Manchester, UK195 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2024 • Couples
This was a medici palace, was then bought by another family and is now a municipal building.. It's more of a town hall with some old stuff, some paintings and a few really decent rooms. Some of the hanging tapestries are very faded and have light direct on them which seems very weird from a conservation perspective

Not worth the money and I.like my history.
Written 28 June 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ThorwaldVikingAsgaar
Winter Park, FL169 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2024 • Family
The Palazzo Medici, also called the Palazzo Medici Riccardi after the later family that acquired and expanded it, is a Renaissance palace located in Florence, Italy.

It is the seat of the Metropolitan City of Florence (active city council meetings will take place) and a museum.

The palace was designed by Michelozzo di Bartolomeo for Cosimo de' Medici, head of the Medici banking family, and was built between 1444 and 1484.

It was well known for its stone masonry, which includes architectural elements of rustication and ashlar.
The tripartite elevation used here expresses the Renaissance spirit of rationality, order, and classicism on human scale. This tripartite division is emphasized by horizontal stringcourses that divide the building into stories of decreasing height. The transition from the rusticated masonry of the ground floor to the more delicately refined stonework of the third floor makes the building seem lighter and taller as the eye moves upward to the massive cornice that caps and clearly defines the building's outline.

Michelozzo was influenced in his design of the palace by both classical Roman and Brunelleschian principles. During the Renaissance revival of classical culture, ancient Roman elements were often replicated in architecture, both built and imagined in paintings. In the Palazzo Medici Riccardi, the rusticated masonry and the cornice had precedents in Roman practice, yet in totality it looks distinctly Florentine, unlike any known Roman building.

Similarly, the early Renaissance architect Brunelleschi used Roman techniques and influenced Michelozzo. The open colonnaded court that is at the center of the palazzo plan has roots in the cloisters that developed from Roman peristyles.
The once open corner loggia and shop fronts facing the street were walled in during the 16th century. They were replaced by Michelangelo's unusual ground-floor "kneeling windows" (finestre inginocchiate), with exaggerated scrolling consoles appearing to support the sill and framed in a pedimented aedicule, a motif repeated in his new main doorway.
The new windows are set into what appears to be a walled infill of the original arched opening, a Mannerist expression Michelangelo and others used repeatedly.

The Palazzo Medici Riccardi was built after the defeat of the Milanese and when Cosimo de Medici had more governmental power. Rinaldo degli Albizzi had also died giving Cosimo and his supporters even more influence.

With this new political power Cosimo decided he wanted to build a palazzo. He was able to acquire property from his neighbors in order to begin the building of the palazzo. Unlike other wealthy families however, Cosimo wanted to start fresh and cleared the site before he began building. Most other families, including those from wealthy backgrounds, built from what was already present. During this time, there was also a concern over sumptuary laws which affected how much wealth one could display or how to display wealth without displaying wealth. Cosimo agreed with this law and believed in this ideal possibly because of his status within the Signoria of Florence.
As Pater Patriae, Cosimo was able to find ways around it through building materials and the idea of having the exterior of the building simpler and modest while the inside was more decorated. It was larger than other palazzi but its more modest design made it less noticeable. Yet, Cosimo's attempts at modesty did not help later on when the Medici family was scrutinized for their political power.
Accused of spending money that was not his, Cosimo's house became part of arguments claiming that the Medicis built the Palazzo with money that was not theirs.

The palace remained the principal residence of the Medici family until the exile of Piero de Medici in 1494. Following their return to power the palace continued to be used by the Medici until 1540 when Cosimo I moved his principal residence to the Palazzo Vecchio. The Palazzo Medici continued to be used as a residence for younger family members until, too austere for Baroque era tastes the palace was sold to the Riccardi family in 1659.
The Riccardi renovated the palace and commissioned the magnificent gallery frescoed with the Apotheosis of the Medici by Luca Giordano.
The Riccardi family sold the palace to the Tuscan state in 1814 and in 1874 the building became the seat of the provincial government of Florence.
Written 21 June 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

River_runr
Newmarket, Canada2 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2024 • Solo
Excellent tour by All Around Florence tours. Our guide, Giacomo. gave a very educational and entertaining tour of the old city.
Written 20 May 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

disgustorama
113 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2024 • Family
Visit the residence of the famous Medici family and admire the wonderful “ Cappella dei Magi”with works by Benozzo Gozzoli and Filippo Lippi. The “ Gallery of mirrors “ and the courtyard are also fine areas in the palace.
Written 16 March 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

LesleyDublin
Dublin, Ireland256 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2023 • Couples
This is where the Medici family actually lived. We booked tickets in advance for early in the morning and we went straight in. The chapel of the Magi is on the first floor. You are only allowed in for 5 minutes as it is quite small and groups of 10 go in at a time. You just have time to look around it and take pictures. There is another stunning room, A Mirror Gallery. It’s a lovely building to walk around. There is an indoor and outdoor courtyard and garden. There was also a display of busts downstairs and two other exhibitions. One was of modern tapestries and pictures ( from the 1930s) which were very colourful. I really enjoyed this building. It was one of my favourite in Florence.
Written 29 October 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

David Y
Boston, MA3 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2023 • Couples
Found this to be an interesting place to visit. Very relaxed with incredible artwork. You got the feel of the building and the chapel and the ceiling of the Mirror Gallery are unforgettable. Near the Academia gallery where the statue of David is. We were sightseeing after seeing David and this was relaxed and not crowded, a welcome change.
Written 8 October 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Philip C
York, ME576 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2023 • Couples
If you've been to Florence before, don't want to queue again for the Duomo, have exhausted your passion for Renaissance art at the Uffizzi (or don't have a timed ticket), have experienced the perfection of the David, and are avoiding the rain, you might want to stop in.
Written 24 September 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Helen B
dubliner23 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2023 • Couples
Just popped to have a look. Fascinating building and Artwork. Exhibition on at time exceptional. One hour visit
Written 29 August 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

GAR
882 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2023 • Solo
I had a great visit to this beautiful historical palace. It’s well worth a visit for those interested in the Medicis. There is also a useful booklet of information about the palace they give you for free
Written 21 August 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

VoyagerAimerSourire
Princeton, NJ760 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2023
Florence and the Rennaissance are eternally linked, but if ever you want to see some other artistic period in history represented, there is the Palazzo Medici Riccardi. We visited during the Luca Giordano exhibit, showing his preparatory drawings (held at other museums) for his Baroque fresco at the Palazzo. The rest of the Palazzo is very interesting as well, cutting through several centuries of art history in Florence. All in a venue that is not overrun by the summer tourist crowds. Great place to switch artistic gears!
Written 13 August 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Palazzo Medici Riccardi - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024) - Tripadvisor

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