Tempio di Antonino e Faustina

Tempio di Antonino e Faustina

Tempio di Antonino e Faustina
4
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Duration: < 1 hour
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The area
Address
Neighbourhood: Campitelli
How to get there
  • Fori Imperiali-Colosseo • 6 min walk
  • Colosseo • 6 min walk
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as waiting time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Popular mentions

4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles99 reviews
Excellent
33
Very good
56
Average
10
Poor
0
Terrible
0

backpacker31
Boynton Beach, FL5,760 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2020 • Solo
This is an ancient Roman temple (c. 141AD) that had subsequently been converted into a church (perhaps as early as the 7th century). The fact that the church kept the massive row of columns and constructed the church from within this original structure is fascinating and most unique. What I found even more interesting is the fact that the front door was once ground level (today, the front door is roughly 20’ off the ground). Unfortunately access is not permitted due to structural integrity issues.
Written 2 March 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Mairwen1
United Kingdom10,943 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2022
Like the Taj Mahal, this temple was built as a tribute to love.
When Faustina, wife of the emperor Antonius, died in 141AD at the age of just 35, he built this temple to honour her and to lift her status to that of a goddess.
A gold and silver statue of Faustina was placed in the temple, coins were minted with her image and he established a charity in her name, to help orphan girls. He was by all accounts, genuinely devastated when she died. He wrote "I would rather live with her on Gyara [ie give up his empire and live in exile] than without her in the Palace".
After his own death his name was added to the temple and a statue of him was placed beside her statue, uniting the pair forever (or at least for two centuries until the Christians dragged the pagan statues out of the Temple and smashed them). Chunks of the statues were recovered during excavations and have been placed at the front of the temple.
What you see of the temple today is the intact row of 10 towering Corinthian columns. They have been well preserved because in the medieval period, the temple was transformed into the Church of Saint Lawrence in Miranda. A lot of the original structure was torn down but the conversion meant that the original columns and attic were preserved and still form a part of the church.
ENTRY: It is worth noting that you cannot buy a separate entry to the forum. It is included in the combo Colosseum/Roman Forum ticket and therefore is essential to book ahead.
Written 28 June 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Alessandro F
Milan, Italy31,964 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2019 • Solo
In 141 AD was built this Temple in memory of the wife of Emperor Antonio, she died in that year.
After twenty years, at the died of Emperor Antonio, the temple was dedicated to both.
600 years later, the temple was incorporated to the church of Saint Lorenzo in Miranda .
Written 26 November 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Dimitris L
Sydney, Australia49,858 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2017 • Couples
Tempio di Antonino e Faustina was built in the mid second century by emperor Antoninus Pius to honour his wife Faustina. It was also dedicated in his honour after his death and deification, hence the two names of the temple. It later was converted into a Christian church. Worth stopping by and having a look. It's in the Roman Forum. You can look at it from the outside as entry is not allowed.
Written 22 October 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

on_the_go_98765
Tucson20,597 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2016 • Couples
Dead at age 40, so much had been accomplished but yet there was so much more to do. Educating and caring for the poor children and women ranked high on her personal agenda.

Her husband had her declared a deity and erected a temple in her honor. She certainly made an impression on her husband. The perfect wife, even if she was only 10 (or so) when she married.

Welcome to the temple.

Born in 100 AD, she married him sometime between 110 and 115 AD and she delivered 4 children. No explanation as to cause of death.

He followed her in death (the inevitable way of the world). Antonio was named as a deity and and now he shares equal billing with her at the temple.

It was a love that couldn't die ... and this story should not, either.

So, today what do we see? There is an after-thought of a ramp leading up in the area of the entry to the Temple. There is a 20 foot difference still to be navigated to get to the entry. Soil level changes and changes wrought by excavations and Medieval attempts to "fill the gaps' produce a strange incongruent mish-mash.

Of all the things seen today, the one thing remaining puzzling is the appearance of the 2 torso shapes on the porch to the temple/portico. The sculpture parts seem to be huddling, they have no heads, and no one has any idea who they are ... but nearly everyone thinks they have been here since the beginning.

The pillars show evidence of rope marks during the time the columns would have been pulled down to desecrate the pagan temple. Why were the sculptures allowed to remain? Some day this mystery will be solved but just not now (unfortunately).
Written 18 September 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Babalu
Boston, MA365 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2019 • Family
Awesome spot in the Forum. The Roman Forum is just an amazing living art museum that stands in the middle of ancient Rome. To be able to walk thru and touch where Romans lived 2000+ years ago is so inspiring.

Get the SUPER pass - which is only 12 euros more - and get excluding access to 7 sites including an amazing 3d experience of a Palace, the museum of artifacts and a church that has to be seen to beloved. the frescos were amazing.

Just pls - pls - respect the place. Everywhere people were climbing on the sites. graffiti, and kids put on top of ancient monuments for your xmas card pic. respect this history. Soon, none of us will be able to get close to this because of this that are not respectful
Written 28 April 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

midway42
Georgia3,375 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2023 • Solo
The Emperor and Stoic philosopher Marcus Aurelius originally dedicated this structure to his late predecessor Antoninus Pius, who in turn had dedicated it to his late wife, Faustina the Elder. The latter was the first Roman empress to have a dedicated building in the Forum. In the following centuries the building was coverted into a Roman Catholic church, although the details or this transformation appear to be hazy at best. Pope Martin V gave a church to the Guild of Apothecaries in the 15th century, and the organization still owns the building to this day. It is located on the Via Sacra just opposite the Regia and adjacent to the Temple of Romulus. I visited (at a cost) via a private tour of the Forum organized by my friends at the Hotel Eden. We spent about an hour inside, and the internal guide began with a history of the building with a view of the Via Sacra down below; we then took a quick tour of the church interior and spent thirty minutes browsing a pharmacy museum that somewhat incongruously (for anyone but a physician) takes up several rooms of the building. A small display of documents regarding Pope Martin V rounded out the experience. After ascending to the top with the requisite unique-if-not-sweeping views of the Forum we departed to continue our tour outside.

In summary, I thoroughly enjoyed my visit here. In a single building I had the opportunity to experience the layers of history scattered throughout the Forum. Although it came at an exorbitant cost (close to 1,000 Euros for the entire tour) the memories were indelible and the views worth it. Add the extra twist of the Apothecary Museum inside and for those of us in healthcare it’s about as much of a “must visit” as you can hope to see in the Eternal City. A recommended, although admittedly not essential, visit for those with the means and interest.
Written 18 April 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ChiefGuru
Decatur, IN3,300 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019
The Antoninus and Faustina Temple was built along the Via Sacra in 141 A.D. by Emperor Antoninus Pius for his deceased wife, Faustina the Elder. When he died and was deified in 161 A.D., the temple was rededicated to Antoninus and Faustina by his successor, Marcus Aurelius. This large structure stands out with its ten monolithic Corinthian columns of its entry porch, which are 56 feet tall. The temple was converted to a Roman Catholic church (Church of San Lorenzo in Miranda) no later than the 11th century, though some date the conversion to the 7th century. A curiosity is the door of the church opens as though suspended in mid-air at the center of the facade. A staircase was built in the Middle Ages on the side facing the Forum, but it is now impossible to enter from that side because there is a gap of ~20 feet between the foot of the steps and the bronze door. Before the archeological excavations, the ground level was at this door. Excavations in front of the temple were undertaken in 1546, in 1810, and again at intervals from 1876. The excavations dramatically show, when the door was created, the level of the earth that had deposited over the ruins of the Forum had reached that height. You can imagine that this deposition of earth occurred pervasively across all of the Roman Forum across centuries. Another building in the Roman Forum which should be seen.
Written 2 September 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

SuperTed19
Madison, WI746 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2019 • Couples
This is one of the largest structures still standing in the forum, and it is most impressive in person.
Written 27 July 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

daffystjob
Manchester, UK809 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2018 • Couples
Whilst visiting the Forum in February, this temple was out of bounds. It is in good condition considering many other buildings in the forum, but it looked like it was receiving some repair whilst I was there. I don't know if it is usually open to visit inside but I doubt it. It is a very impressive building though and I wish it was possible to explore it a little closer.
Written 19 March 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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