Tempio di Vesta
Tempio di Vesta
4
Historic SitesArchitectural Buildings
9:00 AM - 7:15 PM
Monday
9:00 AM - 7:15 PM
Tuesday
9:00 AM - 7:15 PM
Wednesday
9:00 AM - 7:15 PM
Thursday
9:00 AM - 7:15 PM
Friday
9:00 AM - 7:15 PM
Saturday
9:00 AM - 7:15 PM
Sunday
9:00 AM - 7:15 PM

Top ways to experience Tempio di Vesta and nearby attractions

The area
Address
Neighbourhood: Aventine
Contrary to the chaos of the city, the Aventine is Rome’s oasis. A neighbourhood made up of a patchwork of ancient churches, hidden gardens, private homes and embassies, peace and quiet is top priority and the vibe definitely friends and family. Take a walk around the Aventine and you’ll find a treasure hunt of surprises like the clever little keyhole at the Knights of Malta entrance (the only place you’ll find a line) along with Parco Savello (Giardino degli Aranci) next to the ancient Santa Sabina church. Keep your eyes on the 1960s architecture, several modern buildings are built atop Rome’s original 4th century BC wall.
How to get there
  • Fori Imperiali-Colosseo • 6 min walk
  • Colosseo • 6 min walk
Reach out directly

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as waiting time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles109 reviews
Excellent
33
Very good
53
Average
22
Poor
1
Terrible
0

FTMDave
Adria, Italy7,149 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2021
Remains of the temple of the vestal virgins with their sacred flame. Only some of the columns remain. Part of the Roman forum.
Written 5 July 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

dapper777
Monaco62,714 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2020 • Friends
Wrongly called "Temple of Vesta" (after the virgin goddess of the hearth, home, and family in Roman religion, Vesta), the Temple of Hercules Victor, located in the Forum Boarium, near Piazza Bocca della Verità, most likely dates back to the 2nd century BC and was possibly erected by General Lucius Mummius Achaicus (destroyer of Corinth).
Today it is the oldest building in Rome still standing.
Itis built in marble with 20 Corinthian columns surrounding the cylindrical cell made of marble blocks, while the entablature and the original dome-shaped roof were lost. At the beginning of the XII century the temple was transformed into the Church of ST. Stephen, called Chiesa delle Carrozze and from the sixteenth century into the Church of Santa Maria del Sole.
Historically Forum Boarium is a rather interesting site in Rome. Before Ostia Antica was built, probably it was the hub of the Roman trade and commerce.
Only guided and booked tours.
Written 3 August 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

SoCalOregonian
Murrieta, CA10,394 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2019
This was home to the “sacred fire” and was from the 4th century BC. When completed it consisted of 20 columns of which only a few remain today after the 1930 reconstruction
Written 30 October 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ChiefGuru
Decatur, IN3,306 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019
The Temple of Vesta beginnings date to the initial settlement in this area (later 8th - 7th century B.C.). The temple was dedicated first and foremost to the cult of Vesta, the goddess of the hearth and home. This is a small round temple. its round form has been traced back to simple straw huts of the early Roman settlement. It has been assumed that such a hut served as the first cult site. Numa Pompilius (legendary second king of Rome, succeeding Romulus - reigned 715–673 BC ) is believed to have built the first round temple along with the Regia (office of the Pontifex Maximus, highest religious official of Rome) and House of the Vestal Virgins in their original forms. The Pontifex Maximus was the superior of the Vestal Virgins. The Regia and House of the Vestal Virgins are both nearby to the Temple of Vesta. The center of the Temple had a hearth which geld the sacred Flame. The vestal virgins, a group of six or seven virgin priestesses, maintained the eternal holy hearth. As the handmaidens of Vesta, the principal duty of the six Vestals was never to allow the flame to be extinguished. The Temple had restricted access; only the highest priest in Rome (the Pontifex Maximus) and the vestal virgins were allowed in the temple. The Temple saw reconstruction and remodeling in the 3rd century B.C., 1st century A.D., and 2nd century A.D. The last time it burned, in A.D. 191, the temple was restored by Julia Domna, the wife of Emperor Settimio Severus (his Arch is too in the Forum). Sadly, the Temple was completely stripped of its marble (which was reused in churches and papal palaces) in the mid-sixteenth century, a section of the temple was reconstructed in 1930, during the dictatorship of Benito Mussolini. Some of the columns, part of the entablature with a frieze of cultic objects, and elements of the cella wall are original; the majority of what can be presently seen is the result of the partial rebuilding. However, a good impression of the overall dimensions of the temple can be gained from the foundation (still visible today), which is composed of opus caementicium (Roman concrete) and has a diameter of around 50 feet.
Written 4 September 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

SuperTed19
Madison, WI742 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2019 • Couples
Not much remains, but this temple weaves its way through Roman history as it was destroyed and restored on more than one occasion.
Written 28 July 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Mark42139
New York City, NY1,647 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019 • Family
This is an interesting part of the ancient Roman Forum. It's an impressive looking Temple worth seeing
Written 4 July 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Pete
Fredericksburg, VA1,206 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2019 • Solo
Vestal Virgins was a cult that went way back in time. As far as I can make out, Lavinium, a town 30 miles south of Rome, founded in the 10th century BC, is where the cult of the goddess Vesta got started. Historians believe that Romulus and Remus were born from a Vestal Virgin priestess named Rhea Silvia. It appears that the purpose of the Vestal Virgins was to show, symbolically, the purity of Ancient Rome. I’m not sure if and how much the Vestal Virgins were a model for Christianity’s Nun. Not much is left of the ancient ruins.
Written 2 July 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

TravelerCentralFLA
Clermont, FL1,699 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2019 • Family
The Temple of Vesta is in the middle of the ancient Roman Forum. it was the temple where the sacred flame of the goddess Vesta was kept. The Romans believed that the sacred fire was tied to the city and that if it went out it would be a bad omen for the city.
The flame was kept by a group of priestesses known as the Vestal Virgins. They took a vow of chastity when they entered the service of Vesta. However, in exchange for their service they were given a very high social rank in ancient Rome. For example their box in the Colosseum was right across from Caesar's.
The ruins of the temple are interesting because it is evident from the foundations that the building was circular. This is unique because it was one of the few circular buildings in the Forum. Right next to the temple was the villa that housed the Vestal Virgins. Both the temple and the area of housing are some of the more interesting stops in the Forum.
In order to see the temple of Vesta you need a ticket to enter the Forum area. I highly recommend a visit to the Forum and that you stop and visit the ruins of the Temple.
Written 26 March 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

nellielim
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia4,048 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2018 • Family
Located in the Roman Forum, the circular Temple of the Vestal Virgins is dedicated to the Goddess Vesta. The vestal virgins live next door at the House of Vestal Virgins and were responsible for keeping the temple's sacred flame permanently alight. Most of the temple are in ruins.
Written 19 December 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Czar Emmanuel
Manila, Philippines9,446 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2018
People who visit this place may get disappointed when they realize that, of the original structure of the temple, only a few ruins are left in site. But the rich history behind it, specifically the important role that the Vestal virgins played in ancient times in Rome, compensates for the scarcity of structures left standing in place. And since this site is part of the entrance ticket that you pay when you visit the Roman Forums, you might as well visit it. Be sure to read the historical marker for some historical information..It would set your imagination on fire!
Written 20 September 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Tempio di Vesta - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024) - Tripadvisor

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