Puerta de Las Granadas
Puerta de Las Granadas
4
Points of Interest & LandmarksMonuments & Statues
About
Duration: < 1 hour
Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing
Tours & experiences
Explore different ways to experience this place.

Top ways to experience Puerta de Las Granadas and nearby attractions

The area
Address
Neighbourhood: Realejo - San Matias
Reach out directly

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as waiting time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Popular mentions

4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles37 reviews
Excellent
4
Very good
20
Average
13
Poor
0
Terrible
0

Mikael F
Helsinki, Finland31,244 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2023
This gate is part of the defensive walls of Alhambra.

The gate consists of three arches: a central one for the cavalries; and two lateral ones for people.

The town side is beautifully decorated, but the Alhambra side is not.

From here, the street descends to Plaza Nueva.
Written 2 April 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Terry M
Hamilton, Canada4,896 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2021
As you head up to the Alhambra, you will pass under this great gate. Construction began in 1526, commemorating the visit of Charles I of Spain to Granada after his marriage to Isabel of Portugal. Its overall look is of Roman vintage. The fruit connection relates to three ample pomegranates above the main arch. The gate replaced an Arab gate.
Written 3 November 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Mairwen1
United Kingdom10,788 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2020
If you are walking to the Alhambra, this is the first of several gateways, you will pass through. Starting from Plaza Nueva, this gateway leads you through the Alhambra Forest and uphill, along the Cuesta de Gomerez. It was an easy, pleasant walk and took us about 10-15 minutes, walking uphill through greenery and shady trees to get to the Justice Gate, which is one of the main entrance points to the Alhambra.
The Puerta Las Granadas looks much like a standard Roman triumphal arch, with a large central arch, flanked by two smaller arches. It doesn't belong to Moorish times and was added much later by Charles V when he embarked on his extensive building program, that included the brand new palace alongside the Nasrid Palaces of the Alhambra.
The gate was built in honour of Charles V’s wedding to Princess Isabella of Portugal in 1526, which explains the 3 large, ripe pomegranates sitting on top of the gate - a long-time symbol of fertility. They were married on March 10, 1526 at the Alcazar of Seville. The marriage was strategic rather than romantic, designed to strengthen ties between Portugal and Spain. However, the pomegranates did the trick and they had 5 children. Their first-born was a son who went on to become Phillip II.
It’s free to walk through the gates.
Written 10 January 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Vadim
Murmansk, Russia33,866 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2019
The gates of Granada are the main ones through which tourists pass from Plaza Nueva through the slope of Gomeres to the Alhambra. But their meaning is not only in this. This gate was built in the post-Moorish period, in honor of the wedding of Charles V with the Portuguese Princess Isabella in 1526. The coat of arms of The Holy Roman Emperor and the Spanish king, carved on the eardrum.
Written 18 November 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Dimitris L
Sydney, Australia48,982 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019
This is a very imposing gate and it was meant to be. It was built in the 16th century and it forms the entrance to the elaborate Alhambra. It looks like a triumphal Arch. We started from Plaza Nueva and turned into Cuesta de Gomerez. At the intersection of these two streets there is a sign pointing towards the Alhambra. We followed the road uphill and eventually came to this Gate. There are several shops on either side of the street. Upon entering the Gate you follow the path through a sort of garden which finally takes you to your destination.
Written 1 May 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

staledale
1,429 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2019
The gate wall has 3 arched entrances, and just beyond that gate are 3 paths. Steps that go up to the right. A paved level path to the middle, and a steep, earthen path to left. While somewhat steep, it is a short, zig-zag walk to the Puerta de Justicia entrance to the Alhambra. Much quicker.
Written 22 February 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

LuizDutraNeto
Rio de Janeiro, RJ8,575 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2019
"Puerta de las Granadas" dates from 1536 and was projected by famous architect Pedro Machuca, seconded by Luís Hurtado and Iñigo Lopez. This solemn Renaissance triumphal arch replaces an old Islamic gate, whose remains can still be seen on its right side. The Imperial shield of Carlos V, at the top of the arch, is crowned by three "granadas" (pomegranates, in English). The city of Granada is named after this fruit, which is also its symbol. One last remark: when visiting the magnificent "La Alhambra" complex, don't miss three of the monuments related to Emperor Carlos V: the "Palácio de Carlos V" (a palace), the "Pilar de Carlos V" (a fountain) and, naturally, "Puerta de las Granadas" (a triumphal arch), all three projected by architect Pedro Machuca. Enjoy!
Written 14 January 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

GreenThumb331
San Fernando, Philippines2,873 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2018
This was our exit point from the Alhambra on our way to the Royal Chapel in the city. After walking for about 2 hours, it is easy to miss this gate. In the old days, the Gate of the Pomegranates was an historical access point of a pathway that leads through the Forest of the Alhambra to the Nasrid palace inside the Alhambra. The path starts in the city centre, Plaza Nueva, and continues up the Cuesta de Gomérez, before reaching the monument.

In 1526, the gate was built in substitution of the original Islamic gate, the Bib al-Buxar which was a defensive tower that protected the valley. Some of the original Arabic architecture can be seen on the right side of the gate. The Gate of the Pomegranates receives its name from the three large open pomegranates that sit atop the main arch, accompanied by the imperial shield of Charles I of Spain and V of Germany and the allegorical figures of Peace and Abundance. The city of Granada is named after this fruit.
Written 11 October 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Brucestewart
Livingston, UK10,160 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2018 • Couples
After touring around the Alhambra complex for about 3 hours our guide led us back into Granada on foot taking us through the Puerta de Las Granadas. He told us that in Spanish the word for pomegranate is Granada and as a result the fruit is the symbol of the city. It is therefore represented in carvings and buildings throughout the city including this old gateway.
Written 16 October 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Rick A
Rotterdam, The Netherlands156 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2018
We passed through this gate when we walked down the hill from our visit to Alhambra. Excellently conserved over time, this gate leads to an idyllic Spanish street that takes you down to the Plaza Nueva
Written 11 September 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Showing results 1-10 of 17
Is this your Tripadvisor listing?
Own or manage this property? Claim your listing for free to respond to reviews, update your profile and much more.
Claim your listing

Puerta de Las Granadas - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024) - Tripadvisor

All Granada HotelsGranada Hotel DealsLast Minute Hotels in Granada
All things to do in Granada
Day Trips in Granada
RestaurantsFlightsHoliday homesTravel StoriesCruisesCar Hire