Archeological Crypt of the Parvis of Notre-Dame

Archeological Crypt of the Parvis of Notre-Dame

Archeological Crypt of the Parvis of Notre-Dame
4
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Tuesday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Wednesday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Thursday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Friday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Saturday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Sunday
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
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The area
Address
Neighbourhood: Ile de la Cité
Two islands sit in the middle of the Seine at the very heart of Paris. The more majestic one, Ile de la Cité, sparkles with history. This is the birthplace of Paris, the home of the Gothic Sainte-Chapelle, and the site of the prison where Marie Antoinette was held before her execution. Tourists flock to see the iconic Notre Dame and the beautiful bridges that straddle the Seine. Ile Saint-Louis, the more provincial island, welcomes you with cozy traditional eateries, small boutiques, and what some people say is the best ice cream in the city. This is essential Paris from its very beginnings to its modern appeal.
How to get there
  • St-Michel – Notre-Dame • 2 min walk
  • St-Michel – Notre-Dame • 2 min walk
Reach out directly
See what travellers are saying
  • Erkki N
    884 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    Ruins dating back to roman age
    The crypt is, of course oozing old history, although it is not an intact construction, but more of set of excavated ruins. This goes way back to the roman age, but still, there is not that much to see here and unlike in many other sights EU citizens unset 25 do not enter free of charge. A quick visit for archaeology buffs should be recommendable, others may consider their priorities before paying.
    Visited August 2022
    Travelled with family
    Written 15 July 2023
  • RichyGoesTravelling
    United Kingdom3 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Fantastic museum under Notre-Dame
    The Archeological Crypt doesn't seem to be heavily advertised, but if you are interested in the history of Paris, it is not to be missed. The exhibit itself is much larger than I expected with wonderfully preserved roman remains. Almost all of the displays are written in multiple languages and tell a fascinating story of early Paris. Overall I was really impressed by the quality of the exhibit.
    Visited February 2024
    Travelled as a couple
    Written 17 February 2024
  • Victoria
    189 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Hidden gem
    Not many tourists seem to know about this place, which is a shame. If you're interested in Roman and medieval history, learn more about Paris' earlier times in this small but well-put together museum. Located right near Notre Dame, descend the stairs below the modern city street level to where the Roman city of Lutetia was built. See the remains of thermal baths and even the old port. Looks at items recovered from the river from Roman through medieval times. Signs in French, English, and Spanish is highly informative and gives a good overview of the beginnings of the city.
    Visited February 2024
    Travelled solo
    Written 18 February 2024
  • Brendan S
    Arlington, Virginia2,016 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Millennia of history here
    Everyone knows that Paris is a city with a history dating back many centuries, but the Archaeological Crypt, which is located at the foot of Notre Dame cathedral, is about the prehistory of Paris. It starts with Neanderthal flints from more than 50,000 years ago, but the focus is on about 1,000 square feet of preserved ruins of the ancient Roman town of Lutetia. These include the remnants of a port area as well as multiple rooms of a Roman bathhouse. There are also artifacts displayed that have been recovered from the Seine that include swords and spears and religious medallions and totems that were thrown into the river over the ages. The signage is in French, English and Spanish. There are also some short interesting videos in French and 3-D animations of the ruins. The museum can be thoroughly visited in about an hour and costs 9 Euros.
    Visited May 2024
    Travelled solo
    Written 14 May 2024
  • Traveler O
    Washington DC, District of Columbia1,169 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Stones of Time
    Situated beneath Notre Dame, this is an interesting exhibit that covers the history of the structures and remnants from old Paris - i.e. 2,000 years ago. Much of this includes stone foundations from the Roman era. You'll even see a wall remnant from where the piers would've been on this island for Roman era ships to moor and offload. Fascinating perspective and explanations including collections of items found in the river and around the island during excavations over the years. Nice displays - in French and English mostly. Exhibit doesn't need more than 45 minutes to be seen. Small gift shop at entrance. Note: no toilets on site though.
    Visited May 2024
    Travelled solo
    Written 22 May 2024
These reviews are the subjective opinion of Tripadvisor members and not of TripAdvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as waiting time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Popular mentions

4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles621 reviews
Excellent
155
Very good
253
Average
152
Poor
45
Terrible
16

Traveler O
Washington DC, DC1,169 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2024 • Solo
Situated beneath Notre Dame, this is an interesting exhibit that covers the history of the structures and remnants from old Paris - i.e. 2,000 years ago. Much of this includes stone foundations from the Roman era. You'll even see a wall remnant from where the piers would've been on this island for Roman era ships to moor and offload. Fascinating perspective and explanations including collections of items found in the river and around the island during excavations over the years. Nice displays - in French and English mostly. Exhibit doesn't need more than 45 minutes to be seen. Small gift shop at entrance. Note: no toilets on site though.
Written 22 May 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Brendan S
Arlington, VA2,016 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2024 • Solo
Everyone knows that Paris is a city with a history dating back many centuries, but the Archaeological Crypt, which is located at the foot of Notre Dame cathedral, is about the prehistory of Paris. It starts with Neanderthal flints from more than 50,000 years ago, but the focus is on about 1,000 square feet of preserved ruins of the ancient Roman town of Lutetia. These include the remnants of a port area as well as multiple rooms of a Roman bathhouse. There are also artifacts displayed that have been recovered from the Seine that include swords and spears and religious medallions and totems that were thrown into the river over the ages. The signage is in French, English and Spanish. There are also some short interesting videos in French and 3-D animations of the ruins. The museum can be thoroughly visited in about an hour and costs 9 Euros.
Written 14 May 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Victoria
189 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2024 • Solo
Not many tourists seem to know about this place, which is a shame. If you're interested in Roman and medieval history, learn more about Paris' earlier times in this small but well-put together museum.

Located right near Notre Dame, descend the stairs below the modern city street level to where the Roman city of Lutetia was built. See the remains of thermal baths and even the old port. Looks at items recovered from the river from Roman through medieval times.

Signs in French, English, and Spanish is highly informative and gives a good overview of the beginnings of the city.
Written 18 February 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

RichyGoesTravelling
United Kingdom3 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2024 • Couples
The Archeological Crypt doesn't seem to be heavily advertised, but if you are interested in the history of Paris, it is not to be missed.
The exhibit itself is much larger than I expected with wonderfully preserved roman remains. Almost all of the displays are written in multiple languages and tell a fascinating story of early Paris.
Overall I was really impressed by the quality of the exhibit.
Written 17 February 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Myo M
Coquitlam, Canada26,501 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2023 • Solo
After arriving on the Cite Island mainly just for a brief view of the Notre-Dame Cathedral from outside with its restorations in progress (as expected and yes which was just what I saw with a big crane inside the fences although nicely seen was the "front facade" in more or less a "presentable shape"), it was I would say really kind of a "pleasant finding" of this site right under the square in front of the Cathedral with "two themes" and which are about two thousand years apart: firstly the theme of the Roman outpost city called Lutetia which once was where Paris is as seen in the form of "building remnants" which take up almost all of this museum (actually just a "pretty modest-sized" one to walk around one room although the room itself being fairly nice-sized) and yes where I was actually more impressed by the "screen presentation" of that old city (as it likely was in the Roman time) than by the actual remains of those once-beautiful buildings; and secondly the theme of the Notre-Dame Cathedral as seen mainly in the form of "info & illustration" displays (which are specifically about the Cathedral in the early 19th century when it was in disrepair and was kind of "saved by the popularity" of Victor Hugo's "famous novel") with actually also a "high-tech component" nicely added to the Notre-Dame theme which is a pair of "virtual glasses" to wear to see the Notre-Dame of those days about 200 years ago (really a fantastic "virtual experience" taking you from the square in front to the main floor inside then all the way up to the towers where I experienced quite a realistic feeling "while looking down"!).

So yes, on the day mainly intending to do the "outdoors of the city" (after the first two days at the sites of "big structures" such as the Eiffel Tower, the Army Museum & the Chateau de Versailles), it was just about a 15-minute walk here from the Louvre Museum (for just some photo-ops with the "glass pyramid") before heading back the same way (but this time not just above the Seine but also going down to the "lower promenade" for a nice "leisure walk" alongside the river) and where after getting back to the front of the Museum was turning left and entering the Tuileries Garden followed by a walk through that long-rectangular garden to its "west gate" where right outside the gate is the "big open area" of Place de la Concorde with its one side adjacent to the "east end" of the Champs-Elysees Avenue along which I headed to my final stop of the day which was the Arc de Triomphe on the west end of the Avenue (then going up the Gate for the beautiful "blinking show" at the Eiffel Tower from its top to bottom).
Written 7 February 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Rob S
Gold Coast, Australia1,220 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sept 2023 • Couples
Not an attraction that will please all, this vie of an archaeological site beside the famous Notre Dame cathedral includes the reference of the great cathedral through history, especially as influenced by Victor Hugo’s Hunchback of Notre Dame.
For history lovers, it’s worth a visit.
Written 26 September 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Erkki N
Finland884 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2022 • Family
The crypt is, of course oozing old history, although it is not an intact construction, but more of set of excavated ruins. This goes way back to the roman age, but still, there is not that much to see here and unlike in many other sights EU citizens unset 25 do not enter free of charge. A quick visit for archaeology buffs should be recommendable, others may consider their priorities before paying.
Written 15 July 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ana V
Eugene, OR655 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2023
If you visit, you will see the foundations of the Gallo-Roman town of Lutetia, which developed here in the time of Emperor Augustus. You really need to get the audio guide to make sense of what you see because this is not like ruins you see in Rome or Pompeii.
Written 9 April 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ANGELO V
Milan, Italy4,176 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2023 • Solo
The Archaeological Crypt of "île de la Cité" is located in the square in front of the church of Notre Dame.
The crypt itself has some ruins of buildings dating as far back as the Roman city of Lutetia, but a big part of them are hidden behind boardings with reproductions of paintings and prints related to the history of the hunchback of Notre Dame.
There are very few explanations available of the archaeological ruins.
The museum shop does not offer much, too.
Written 1 April 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Mark H
Fond du Lac, WI3,816 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2022
I was standing in front the Notre Day while it's be restored listening and watching buskers and you see folks descending a stairway to this place, so I figured "why not?"

It's a great overview of what the city is literally built one. This archeological site shows how clever the Roman were to find a way to heat their famed baths.

It's worth 30-45 minutes of your time.
Written 8 October 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Archeological Crypt of the Parvis of Notre-Dame, Paris - Tripadvisor

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