Driving around may be a challenge for Americans as driving is on the left hand side of the road.  Your best bet is to stick with taxis, jitneys (local medium sized buses) and the ferry boats. 

Public Jitney

There are many jitney buses traveling around Nassau and into the suburban areas of Nassau.  The #10 bus is the most popular, and will take you from downtown Nassau to Cable Beach.   The jitney will take you along the Western Esplanade, passing Fort Charlotte, Ardastra Gardens entry road, Arawak Cay's Fish Fry as well as the Cable Beach Resorts area passing hotels such as Wyndham, Sheraton and Sandals.  You can ask the driver to stop anywhere along the way.  Pay as you leave the jitney, exact change only, $1.25 for adults and 1.00  for small children.   To return to downtown, just flag down the jitney from in front of your hotel or restaurant.  They run every few minutes from 6am - 6:30pm.   Jitneys do not go over the Paradise Island bridge, for this you need to take a cab or ferry boat or if you're feeling up for a challenging walk, you can hike up and over the bridge.

To catch the #10 jitney, head to George Street, just across the street from the Bay Street entrance to the Straw Market, hop on at that bus stop in front of McDonalds, across from the British Colonial Hilton entrance.

Paradise Island to Nassau and Back

There are several ways to get from Paradise Island to Nassau and back.  Keep in mind that the area just over the bridge is a good 1/2 hour walk from downtown Nassau.

  • Ferry Boat - Native Ferries run from Paradise Island to Nassau daily from 9am - 6pm.  The cost is $4 per person one way or $8 per person round trip (they advertise they run ever half hour on the hour, but in reality they run when they are filled up -- so you may wait 15-30 minutes)
  • Taxi cab- Cabs are readily available throughout the downtown area, wharf, cruise port and hotel entrances.  Fares should be established before getting into the taxi.  Cabs are not metered.  Fares are based on 2 passengers.  2 small pieces of luggage per person.  Additional passengers are $3.00 each and additional luggage is about $2.00 per piece. 
  • Approximate taxi fares are as follows:
  • Airport to:
  • Cable Beach $18.00
  • Downtown Nassau $27.00
  • Paradise Island $34.00
  • Cable Beach to:
  • Downtown Nassau $15.00
  • Paradise Island $20.00
  • Downtown Nassau to:
  • Paradise Island $11.00
  • Cable Beach $15.00
  • Paradise Island to:
  • Downtown Nassau $11.00
  • Cable Beach $20.00

  • Walk over the bridge.   This bridge rises above the Harbour and is about 600 feet long and 73 feet high at the crest.  It's quite a hike in the heat for those that are not in shape.  The base of the easternmost bridge is the busy and bustling Potters Cay.  This Cay is where the fishing and work boats come in carrying goods from the Out Islands and the days fresh catch.  You'll also find the mailboats lined up here.  Locals have small fish and fruit shacks with the freshest catch of the day and a local favorite conch dinners.  You can watch a fierce game of dominos and sip a cold Kalik (local beer), or savor a spicy conch salad freshly made while you wait.

Atlantis Casino Shuttles

The Atlantis Hotel Shuttle is a free service to Atlantis Resort guests, which runs every 1/2 hour from 7am to midnite, in a circular route 
via the Beach Tower, Coral Tower, Royal Tower, The Ocean Club, The Reef, The Cove, Harborside and Paradise Island Golf Club.

Scooter Rentals 

You will find scooter vendors outside most of the hotels in Nassau and on Paradise Island.   You can also find them outside of the cruiseship dock.  Rentals agents should give you a quick lesson on how to drive.  Driving is on the left, and traffic is tricky. 

Horse Drawn Surrey 

Under the shade trees outside Festival Place, you'll find a que of Bahamian decorated carriages awaiting your arrival.  Drivers will take your for a historic and scenic tour of downtown Nassau for as little as $10 per person for a 20 minute tour.  In recent years the surrey rides have become the subject of controversy due to concerns about maltreatment of the horses. Tourists report that many of the horses appear to be in poor health, and there have been high profile incidents involving death or injury to the animals. As a result, some tourists and locals are calling for stronger and more strictly enforced laws to protect the welfare of the horses, while others maintain that due to the heat and traffic the carriage rides are inherently inhumane and should be banned outright.